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  • 1. Kanopy (Films)

    Kanopy is a video streaming platform which offers a broad collection that includes over 26,000 films and videos from 800 top producers such as BBC Active, California Newsreel, Criterion Collection/Janus films, Documentary Educational Resources, First Run Features, The Great Courses, Green Planet Films, Kino Lorber Edu, Media Education Foundation, National Film Board of Canada, New Day Films, PBS, Psychotheraphy.net, the DEFA Film Library’s (East) German Film Collection, and many more. Kanopy launches over 300 new releases per month. Films range from documentaries, independent and foreign films, must-see classics, and blockbuster movies. With regard to topic coverage, humanities and the arts represent the largest category, followed by education and media/communication. Other strong categories are the sciences, social sciences, and history. Search for films by title, subject, keywords, or browse by subject. Register with Kanopy to utilize features such as playlists, clips, sharing, embedding, and creating a watch list for future viewing. Can’t find what you are looking for? Contact Kanopy and they will try to obtain the film for the database within several weeks. See also Docuseek2 and Films on Demand databases for more streaming video options.
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  • 2. JNUL Digitized Book Repository (Jewish National and University Library)

    The Jewish National and University Library is proud to announce the first stage of a project to digitize rare and out-of-print monographs from its collection. The aim of this project is to make these works freely available not only to on site users but also to the public worldwide. This will both preserve the originals and greatly increase the number of people who will be able to refer to them. An initial group of some 400 volumes has been digitized with the generous support of the Dorot Foundation. Additional works will be added weekly. Selection will be based on considerations of demand, preservation and funding. Only works in the public domain will be considered. The JNUL catalog record for each such work contains a link to the digitized version. The initial selection of titles ranges from 15th century incunabula to early 20th century works.
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  • 3. Hebrew Manuscripts

    Manuscripts from the Library of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America (JTS) of New York. This site includes an invitation to other libraries to submit manuscripts for digitization for Jewish cultural heritage. Numerous historically significant items from across Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, Persia, India, and North America in Hebrew and many other languages are included. (Updates ongoing)
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  • 4. Films on Demand: Master Academic Collection

    Films on Demand is a digital video streaming service which offers access to educational videos from a variety of producers including A&E, PBS, the BBC, National Geographic, HBO Documentary Films, Bill Moyers, Films for the Humanities & Sciences, and more. The Master Academic Collection brings together over 25,000 videos from many areas of study, including health &medicine, humanities & social sciences, science & mathematics, business & economics, as well as archival films & newsreels. See also Kanopy and Docuseek2 databases for more streaming video options.
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  • 5. Early Hebrew Newspapers Project

    The Jewish National and University Library, David and Fela Shapell Family Digitization Project, is pleased to offer access to its Historic Hebrew Newspapers project. The aim of this site is to provide open access to images of the major titles of the early Hebrew press (19th and early 20th century). The site itself is entirely in Hebrew. These newspapers contain a wealth of primary material on Diaspora and Land of Israel history of the period. Access to them has, until now, been limited to a small number of research libraries which held either the crumbling originals or microfilm copies. The first stage of the project, now completed, contains: -- Halevanon (1863-1886) 770 issues, approx. 7,200 pages. -- Hamagid (1856-1903) 2265 issues, approx. 19,500 pages. -- Havazelet (1863-1911) 1857 issues, approx. 14,200 pages. -- Hazefirah (1862-1931) 8,600 issues, approx. 42,000 pages. -- Hameliz (1860-1904) 5,600 issues, approx. 33,000 pages. -- Hazevi/Haor/Hashkafa (1884-1914), 2,534 issues, approx. 12,600 pages. Each newspaper has indexes by common era date, Jewish calendar date and volume/issue numbers. Partial author and subject access is provided for Halevanon, Hamagid and Havazelet via an index created by Yad Ben-Zvi and computerized by the University of Haifa in the 1980's. This index has now been upgraded by the JNUL to a web version, and enhanced with links to the fulltext of each article. This index is limited, however, to Eretz Israel topics in these three newspapers. Unfortunately there are as yet no comprehensive index to Hazevi, Hazefirah and Hameliz. Indexes appeared with several volumes and these are presented together at the site. The runs of these journals are based primarily on the collection of the JNUL, with missing issues filled in with the help of other institutions and private collectors. A few issues are still missing or partial and we welcome the help of other institutions in filling these gap (will expand).
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  • 6. Internet Sacred Text Archive

    The Internet Sacred Text Archive provides archived, mostly public-domain texts (plus links to some others offsite) of significant primary writings in world religions. Where public-domain primary texts are not available in any number, public-domain secondary material is used to provide overviews of religious beliefs and practices. Most texts are in the English language; some texts are in Sanskrit, Latin, Finnish, and other languages. Texts are arranged in the three main sections: Traditional (Neolithic, Shamanism, Australian, Pacific, African, Ancient Near East, Classical Paganism, Northern European, Egyptian, Native American, Wicca/Neopaganism); Eastern (Shinto, Hinduism, I Ching, Taoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Jainism); Western (hypertext Bible, Christian texts, Judaism, Mormonism, Bahai'i, Islam, Zoroastrianism, Esoteric, Age of Reason). (Updates vary)
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  • 7. Hebrew Books

    Hebrew Books is a full-text database (PDF files) of titles by American Rabbis. Most of the titles are in Hebrew, but a few are in English or Yiddish. Pulldown lists of author, city, state, and subject as well as browse and word searches are provided. So far, most of the texts seem to have been published between 1880 and 2011. Although it does not require Hebrew fonts, it does require Internet Explorer/ Netscape 5 versions or higher. (Updated irregularly)
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  • 8. Jewish Encyclopedia

    This website contains the complete contents of the 12-volume Jewish Encyclopedia, which was originally published between 1901-1906. The Jewish Encyclopedia, which recently became part of the public domain, contains over 15,000 articles and illustrations. This online version contains the unedited contents of the original encyclopedia. Since the original work was completed almost 100 years ago, it does not cover a significant portion of modern Jewish History (e.g., the creation of Israel, the Holocaust, etc.). However, it does contain an incredible amount of information that is remarkably relevant today. The scope of the Jewish Encyclopedia is to demonstrate the role that Jews and Judaism have played in diverse areas of general culture, such as science, art, literature, industry, and commerce. The editor wanted it to be scientific in method and without any religious bias. It would serve as a compendium for scholars and as a guide for the Jewish and general public. It is intended to contain a complete survey of Jewish history, literature, and theology, plus material on Jewish communities, sociology, and archeology as well as biographies of prominent Jewish scholars, theologians, poets, businessmen, and physicians. Subject areas of history, biography, sociology, and anthropology comprise the greatest number of articles.It strives to be ecumenical by improving the mutual understanding of Christian and Jew.
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  • 9. Online Treasury of Talmudic Manuscripts (in Hebrew or Aramaic)

    The Jewish National and University Library, David and Fela Shapell Family Digitization Project and the Hebrew University Department of Talmud are happy to present to the public the Online Treasury of Talmudic Manuscripts. This project brings together images of major Talmudic manuscripts from libraries throughout the world. The manuscripts are indexed to enable access by standard citation (tractate, daf and amud for the Talmud Bavli, and tractate, chapter and mishna for the Mishna). As the manuscripts are entirely in Hebrew and Aramaic, the navigation tools of this site are in Hebrew. It is best viewed under Microsoft Windows with Microsoft Explorer version 5 or higher.
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  • 10. Index to Yiddish Periodicals (IYP)

    IYP, the Index to Yiddish Periodicals, is a bibliographical data base using Yiddish, which aims to record the materials published in the Yiddish press in Eastern Europe, from its beginnings (1862) until 1939 (in the Soviet Union: until 1948). At the present IYP comprises approximately 170,000 bibliographic records, covering the following segments of the East European Yiddish Press: 1. All available Yiddish periodicals published in Czarist Russia (1862-1917) of all kinds and frequencies: newspapers, journals, etc. 2. A full run of the major Yiddish daily newspapers published in Warsaw, Haynt and Moment, from their inception until the Holocaust. 3. The major Yiddish periodicals published in interwar Poland in the fields of culture, literature, politics and pedagogy, including a full run of the weekly Literarishe bleter (1924-1939), as well as the two most important weeklies printed in Romania in that period: Arbeter-tsaytun (1921-1931) and Tshernovitser bleter (1929-1937). 4. The major Yiddish literary, cultural and pedagogical periodicals published in Ukraine, Russia and Soviet Russia in the years 1917-1948, including a full run of Eynikayt (1942-1948). This ongoing bibliographical project is carried out under the auspices of the Yiddish Department at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in cooperation with the Jewish National and University Library. This bibliographical data base includes all signed materials, whether they carry the real name of their author or a pseudonym. It doesn’t register unsigned news or articles, except when these deal with issues related to Yiddish literature and culture. (Updates unknown)
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