Dreyfus Affair in the Making of Modern France (1894-1908)

In 1894, Alfred Dreyfus, a French officer of Jewish descent, was convicted of treason and sentenced to life imprisonment. This collection concerning the Dreyfus affair represents the largest outside of France, and is sourced from Harvard’s Houghton Library. It covers the controversy from Dreyfus' humiliating arrest in 1894 to 1908, the year Emile Zola's ashes were transferred to the Pantheon with ceremonial reverence. Comprising over 1,000 volumes, the collection contains all the well-known Dreyfus publications, such as Zola's 1898 newspaper article "J'accuse," as well as rarely seen archival materials. Documents from many different countries and all sides of the controversy reflect the depth and breadth of attention the Dreyfus Affair generated at the turn of the 19th century. The Dreyfus Affair in the Making of Modern France includes: • Most titles listed in the Desachy bibliography –the Dreyfus reference standard for the period 1894-1904 • Predominantly French language materials, with items also in English, German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch and Swedish • Works by the principal figures: Bernard Lazare, Georges Clemenceau, Maurice Barres, Emile Zola, Jean Jaurès, Alfred Dreyfus, Yves Guyot, Ferdinand Walsin Esterhazy, Francis de Pressensé, Emile Duclaux, Abbé Pichot, Louis Havet, Jules Lemaître, as well as hundreds of lesser known authors • Monographs, pamphlets, newspaper clippings and cartoons • Independently published stenographic transcripts of all the major trials.

Time-span

1894-1908

Subscription Type

SUBSCRIPTION

License Info

Unlimited simultaneous users licensed.

Publisher

Gale Cengage

Notes

French and European History

Languages

French, English

Resource Types

E-Books and E-Texts

Online Availability

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