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  • 1. Television News Archive

    This resource provides descriptive summaries of over 30,000 television news programs collected in the Vanderbilt Archive since August, 1968, searchable through the TV-NewsSearch database. The Archive includes programs from ABC, CBS, NBC and CNN. CNN programs can be viewed online. Loan copies of tapes of other programs are available for a fee from the Archive. (Updates vary)
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  • 2. Chazen Museum Collections

    Chazen Museum Collections is the online database documenting objects owned by the Chazen Museum, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Updated periodically, the individual database records may contain thumbnail images of the artwork and supplementary information such as exhibition histories and bibliography when available.
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  • 3. Victorian Web

    The Victorian Web concentrates on Great Britain in the age of Victoria (1837-1901) and is a multidisciplinary resource for Victorian studies and culture. Included are primary and secondary texts (including scholarly book reviews) in British Victorian economics, literature, philosophy, political and social history, popular entertainment, science, technology, and visual arts (painting, architecture, sculpture, book design and illustration, photography, decorative arts, including ceramics, furniture, jewelry, metalwork, stained glass, and textiles, costume and various movements, such as Art Nouveau, Japonisme, and Arts and Crafts). It also includes extensive links to resources for Victorian authors, as well as to periodicals, book reviews, related WWW links, and a bibliography. (Updates ongoing)
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  • 4. First World War

    The First World War Portal consists of three modules each representing different presentations of the First World War, using a vast array of primary source materials drawn from several archives and collections around the world. "Personal Experiences" provides documents on subjects such as daily life and routines in the army and auxiliary services; trench warfare and conditions in the trenches; battles and warfare; and more. The material in this module includes diaries and journals; letters; trench literature and soldiers' journals; photographs, and 360° views of personal items and objects, to name a few. Such key features as interactive maps, a digitized artifacts collection, and a virtual trench experience enable a deeper exploration in numerous facets of this historic event in the early twentieth century. A second module, "Propaganda and Recruitment" offers a wide variety of primary sources on recruitment, training, morale, public opinion, censorship and the development of different forms of propaganda during the First World War. The material has been collated from the Hoover Institution Library and Archives at Stanford University, the Bibliothek für Zeitgeschichte and the Hauptstaatsarchiv in Stuttgart, Cambridge University Library, among several others. Documents include minute books of recruiting committees; German and Russian propaganda postcards; "Le Bonnet rouge," 1916, newspaper articles suppressed by the French government; various other newspapers, cartoons, and photographs; papers on the activities of the German Peace Society; cabaret, concert, and theater programs kept by the German Army; and additional materials. Case studies examine subjects such as aerial propaganda, anti-war protests, the training of recruits, the campaign for American entry, conscription and military service tribunals, Wellington House and the formation of the Ministry of Information. "Visual Perspectives and Narratives" comprises the third module, and features a rich variety of primary source material from the holdings of Imperial War Museums. Through both visual and documentary resources, this collection showcases the international dimensions of the conflict, the British home front and the role of women in the war. The collection includes photographs (documenting the war from multiple international perspectives, including foreign official photographs and private collections); artwork (oil paintings, watercolors, pastels and pencil sketches from a large array of artists, including artists’ commissioning documents); film clips; museum objects; posters; etc. The diverse material allows for an exploration of the following themes: industry and economy, workers and strikes, role of women, education, children, food and rationing, transport, disease, religion and spiritualism, celebration, and more.
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  • 5. Art Theorists of the Italian Renaissance

    The database is a collection of treatises on art and architecture from the period 1470 to 1775. It is structured around the two Italian editions of Giogio Vasari’s Lives of the Artists.
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  • 6. Fieldwork recordings--Dictionary of American Regional English

    From 1965–1970, fieldworkers for the Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE) conducted interviews with nearly 3,000 “informants” in 1,002 communities across America. They visited residents in all fifty states and the District of Columbia, collecting local words, phrases, and pronunciations to document the linguistic diversity of the United States. A digitized subset of the entire fieldwork recording collection was first published online in 2003 at the UW–Madison Digital Collections Center under the title “American Languages: Our Nation’s Many Voices.”
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  • 7. Arachne

    Arachne is the central Object database of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) and the Archaeological Institute of the University of Cologne. Arachne is intended to provide archaeologists and Classicists with a free internet research tool for quickly searching hundreds of thousands of records on objects and their attributes. This combines an ongoing process of digitizing traditional documentation with the production of new digital object and graphic data. Site provides access to an expanding collection of digitized books and photoarchival images relating to objects of Classical antiquity. In 2009, approximately 250,000 objects and 300 books were included. (Continuously updated)
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  • 8. Credo Reference

    This "Premium" edition of Credo Reference is a collection of more than 600 reference tools that may be searched collectively or individually. It includes encyclopedias, dictionaries, atlases, statistical sources, biographical tools, thesauri, books of quotations, image collections, and subject-specific titles. Subject coverage features Medicine & Health, American History, Language & Linguistics, General Literature, Psychology, Religion, Economics, Art & Art History. The sources are enhanced with illustrations, tables, audio files, and interactive maps. Also included are Topic Pages and "Concept Maps," a visual representation of the connections between search results and topics in an interactive format. Some sources (such as The CIA World Factbook and US Census) feature customizable and interactive tables that allow you to add columns to compare data, sort by column, and export and chart tables. Publishers contributing titles to this collection include Routledge, SAGE, Cambridge University Press, Wiley, Elsevier and many others. (Updates vary)
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  • 9. Index of Christian Art

    The Index of Christian Art provides text descriptions and bibliographic references for over 75,000 works of Early Christian and Medieval art in 17 media, created from early apostolic times to 1400. (Additional holdings being added will extend the date range for manuscripts to the sixteenth century.) Extensive thematic and iconographic indexing is also provided. Approximately 100,000 are linked for viewing, and citations are given for published sources of reproductions, if known. The online database is a portion of the 200,000-item indexed picture file compiled at Princeton University. Three copies of the complete index exist and may be consulted at: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library in Washington, D.C.; Getty Research Center, Los Angeles; and Rijksuniversiteit, Utrecht. (Updated annually)
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  • 10. Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics Digital Video Library

    The Hemispheric Institute Digital Video Library (HIDVL) is a collaboration between New York University Libraries and the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics that provides a digital library of performance practices in the Americas. HIDVL documents the expression of social and political life through performance in the many cultures and political landscapes of the Americas. It includes online access to more than 600 hours of video. A trilingual Profile (English, Spanish and Portuguese) is created for each collection, contextualizing the videos with detailed production information, synopses, image galleries, texts, interviews, bibliographies and additional materials. The Hemispheric Institute Special Collections is a growing digital archive of performance and politics in the Americas. Curated by leading scholars, it includes teaching modules, artist profiles, image galleries, articles, scripts, bibliographies and other research materials. Its contents are only available to faculty and students of current Hemispheric Institute Member Institutions. Because UW-Madison is a member, these materials are available to you. To access them, you must create a Hemispheric Institute user account USING YOUR UNIVERSITY ( @wisc.edu) EMAIL ADDRESS, so you can be recognized as a Member by Hemispheric Institute staff, and then login to the website to gain member access to the Special Collections. If you experience any difficulties or have any questions, please contact the Hemispheric Institute through the "Email Us" section of their website.
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