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  • 1. Epigraphic Database Heidelberg

    The Epigraphic Database Heidelberg contains texts of Latin and bilingual (i.e. Latin-Greek) inscriptions of the Roman Empire. With the help of search functions specific queries can be carried out - e.g. a search for words in inscriptions and / or particular descriptive data. The search results are often displayed together with photos and drawings. (Updates unknown, likely irregularly)
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  • 2. Aristoteles Latinus Database

    This is an ongoing digital edition of the corpus of medieval Greek-Latin translations of the works of Aristotle as published in the also ongoing printed series _Aristoteles Latinus_. The electronic database is not identical to the printed editions, as it does not contain the prefaces in which their manuscript traditions are described, nor does it include those editions' apparatus of variant readings, their Greek-Latin comparative apparatus, or their bilingual indexes. The specific utility of this electronic edition lies in the fact that it provides an integrated database of the medieval Latin translations of Aristotle's works. The electronic and the printed editions are thus intended to be complementary. (Updates vary)
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  • 3. Poetry and Prose Recitation Site

    A scholarly website offering original-language recitations by classicists of selected ancient Greek and Latin literary texts and, in some cases, of English-language translations or adaptations of these. Authors include Homer, Cicero, Propertius, Vergil, Ovid, and Statius. Requires QuickTime audio player or RealAudio RealPlayer to hear the recitations. (Updates vary)
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  • 4. Art Theorists of the Italian Renaissance

    The database is a collection of treatises on art and architecture from the period 1470 to 1775. It is structured around the two Italian editions of Giogio Vasari’s Lives of the Artists.
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  • 5. Loeb Classical Library

    Founded by James Loeb in 1911, the mission of the Loeb Classical Library has always been to make Classical Greek and Latin literature accessible to the broadest range of readers. The digital Loeb Classical Library extends this mission into the twenty-first century. Harvard University Press is honored to renew James Loeb’s vision of accessibility, and presents an interconnected, fully searchable, perpetually growing, virtual library of all that is important in Greek and Latin literature. Epic and lyric poetry; tragedy and comedy; history, travel, philosophy, and oratory; the great medical writers and mathematicians; those Church Fathers who made particular use of pagan culture—in short, our entire Greek and Latin Classical heritage is represented here with up-to-date texts and accurate English translations. More than 520 volumes of Latin, Greek, and English texts are available in a modern and elegant interface, allowing readers to browse, search, bookmark, annotate, and share content with ease.
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  • 6. Making of Modern Law: Foreign Primary Sources, 1600-1970

    Four centuries of historical legal codes, statutes, regulations, and code-related commentaries from jurisdictions around the world.
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  • 7. Philological Museum: an Analytic Bibliography of On-Line Neo-Latin Titles

    This is an ongoing bibliography of writings in Latin in all disciplines from the fourteenth century onward whose digitizations are freely available on the Web. Entries are arranged alphabetically by author (in the case of anonymous works, by standard title) or by translator into Latin (these entries have cross references from the name of the original author) and include hotlinks to the digitizations themselves. (Updated irregularly)
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  • 8. In Principio (Latin)

    The incipit or first words of a work, by virtue of its invariability, is the identity card of a text. In medieval European library inventories, where attributions of authorship and title of a work were singularly unstable and where anonymous works abound, the citation of the first words of a text was already seen as one of the surest means to identify it. Enabling one to identify a particular text and at least some of the locations of its manuscript witnesses, In Principio is an ongoing guide to the incipits of Latin texts in all disciplines and from classical antiquity through to the Renaissance. Based on the cataloging of major manuscript repositories, it now (2012) has entries for over a million incipits and adds another 100,000 or so annually. (Updates ongoing)
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  • 9. Gerritsen Collection: Women's History Online

    The Gerritsen Collection contains the full text of over 4,700 publications from around the world documenting the condition of women, the evolution of feminist consciousness, and women's rights. The collection consists of books, monographs, pamphlets, and periodicals primarily in English with German, French, and Dutch-language materials strongly represented. Other languages included are Italian, Spanish, Latin, Greek, Slavic, and Scandinavian. The full text of documents can be searched by keyword and Boolean operators. Records are linked to corresponding page images. (Not updated)
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  • 10. Digital Library of Classic Protestant Texts

    A resource for historians, theologians, political scientists, and sociologists studying the religious and social upheavals of the 16th and 17th centuries, The Digital Library of Classic Protestant Texts contains more than 1,500 works from the Reformation and post-Reformation eras. The full-text articles include theological writings of more than 300 Protestant authors, as well as a wide range of confessional documents, biblical commentaries, polemical treatises, and Bible translations. The database can be browsed by author, title, and topic. (Updates vary)
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