Visual display of the Aldo Leopold papers : 9/25/10-3 : County, State and Foreign Files

				
 
 
         UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 
            SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 
               MOSCOW, IDAHO 
             November 4, 1932 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold 
905 University Avenue 
Madison, Wisconsin 
 
Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
            My major field of study., in Forestry 
is in Range Management and though I have had very 
little experience in game management, I am very 
much interested in it. For the past three years 
I have devoted part of the time in a course in 
Forest Recreation to game matters. I have talked 
the matter over with the Dean of the Forestry School 
and I have his permission to establish a course in 
Game Management as soon as it can be developed. For 
four years I have been gradually building on my own 
ideas until now I have a fair amount of information 
worked up along the lines of the enclosed outline. 
 
            I would greatly appreciate if if you 
would take the time to review this outline, making 
any corrections or additions which you see fit to. 
 
                           Very truly yours, 
 
 
 
                           Liter Z. Spence 
                           Instructor in Forestry 
LIS:h 
Encl. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                Nov. 10, 1932 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr. Liter E. Spence 
School of Jorestry 
University of Idaho 
Moscow, Idaho 
 
Dear Mr. Spence: 
 
           Your outline for the game maea ament course 
 
looks very good and I have no criticisms to offer. It is 
 
much better than some outlines I have seen for similar 
 
ventures. 
 
           I wish youwery u'ccess in your project and 
 
look forward to an opportunity for a visit with you. 
 
 
                           Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
                                       ALDO LEOPOLD 
 
AL-vh 
 
 
I , 
 
  

					
				
				
 
                  SOUTHERN BRANCH 
               UNIVERsITY OF IDAHO 
                     POCATELLO 
                         Feb. 6, 1932 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold 
In Charge--Game Survey 
905 University Avenue, 
Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
Dear Mir. Leopold: 
 
          Your article entitled "Game Range" which 
appeared in the October issue of the Journal of Forestry 
opens up a field which, I am sure, should be expanded 
and offered not only to practising foresters, but to 
students as well, for study. 
 
          Most of us dream about game management as 
something that it would be nice to have, and when 
we are asked a specific question regarding a definite 
problem, we simply shrug and answer 'Ido not know". 
Nor do we have the opportunity to get out and pick 
up at first hand, the knowledge that you have gleaned 
through many years. 
 
          Personally, I feel that there is a definite 
need for such a book, and I hope that enough other 
foresters and game men will show interest in this 
project to enable you to publish it this year. 
 
 
Professor of Forestry 
 
 
CMG: b 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
                 SOUTHERN BRANCH 
               UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 
                    POCATELLO 
                        Feb. 6, 1932 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold 
In Charge--Game Survey 
905 University Avenue 
Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
Dear Mr. Leopold. 
 
          This will acknowledge with gratitude the 
receipt of a copy of the "Game Survey Report of The 
North Central States", and your letter of November 13, 
which I have deferred answering for various reasons. 
 
          The Report is of great value to me. I only 
wish it were possible to have it completed for the 
whole country. 
 
          Along this general line, I have recently 
conferred with Mr. Mack P. Bailey, State Fish and Game 
Warden of Idaho, who has recently come into office. 
While his work is to some extent interfered with as 
political expediency demands, I am sure that Mr. Bailey 
is attempting to do some real constructive game conservation 
work here, including the placing of all of the technical 
staff under civil service, etc. 
 
          While I do not know how far the Spting Arms 
and Ammunition Co. is able to proceed with detailed work 
such as that carried on by yourself, heretofore, I recog- 
nize that there are a number of problems in this state 
which are crying for solution. 
 
          I do not know either, to what extent Mr. Bailey 
might be able to cooperate financially in such a project as 
a Game Survey of Idaho. However, it occurs to me that 
this is urgently needed, and I should like to see work 
started on it during the present administration if possible. 
 
          Whatever game work we are able to do here at the 
Southern Branch of the University must be limited at 
present, to offering not more than one or two elementary 
courses, which, if I interpret trends correctly, will 
lead to a demand from the students for further work of 
this nature, a little later on. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
                  SOUTHERN BRANCH 
               UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 
                     POCATELLO 
(#2--Aldo Leopold) 
 
          Your propsed text on "Principles of Game 
Management" seems to me to be needed seriously right 
now, and I trust that it may be possible for it to 
be published very soon. 
 
          With all best wishes for your splendid 
work, I am, 
 
                           S-Lcer~e y ýurs, 
 
 
                           Chas. M. Genaux 
                           Professor of Forestry 
CMG:b 
 
  

					
				
				
 
     STATE OF IDAHO 
         C. BEN ROSS. GOVERNOR 
 
DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND GAME 
          M. P. BAILEY. WARDEN 
 
              BOISE 
 
 
IN REPLY REFER TO FILE  L 
 
 
                                 February 2, 1932 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Kr. Aldo leopold 
In Chicago--Game Survey 
905 University Ave. 
tadison, Wisconsin 
 
Dear Sir: 
 
We are very much interested in our game conservation 
progra, in Idaho and an, wondering if you can furnish 
us with material which has been published, or give us 
advice toward the end that we may be better informed. 
 
I have heard of your survey entitled "GOae Survey of 
North Central States". 
 
Anything you do for us or that we may be able to 
obtain through information obtained from you will be 
greatly appreciated. 
 
                             Yours very truly, 
 
 
 
 
 
        I1.PDie 
 
  

					
				
				
 
FORM 92287 
 
 
             ESTMBUS4ED 1802 
E.I. ou PONT DE NEmoURS & COMPANY 
 
          CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT                     May 27,1930., 
       WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 
 
 
GAME RESEARCH DIVISION 
 
 
       Kr. Aldo Leopold, 
       421 Chemistry Bldg., 
       University of Wisconsin, 
       Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
       My dear Leopold: 
 
                        I am in receipt of a letter from Earl Fry 
       dated May 21st in which he states: 
 
            "Have you any idea when Aldo Leopold exoects to get 
            out in this part of the country? There is a seem- 
            ingly increase in the idea of a game survey of some 
            of these states and Idaho particularly is interested, 
            even to the extent of hiring a good man for this 
            work. Would like to know something about when Leonold 
            intends to come west." 
 
                         It seems to me that it might be possible to 
       work up some preliminary data from the interested states to be 
       rechecked by you at a later date, using for this purpose the 
       interest already evident. 
 
                         If you feel that there is anything which can 
       be done along this line, will you please write Fry direct and 
       sending him any information you can concerning your future 
       movements. Also please send me cony of your letter for my in- 
       formation and file. 
                              Most sincerely yours. 
 
 
W/P                     L.W.T.WALLMR JR.-C-CNSERVAT ION D)] 
 
 
GAME BREEDING INFORMATION MAY BE SECURED FROM OUR GAME RESEARCH DIVISION

 
  

					
				
				
cow to Major Seler 
 
 
                         MaY 31, 1930 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sr. U  A A. rxT 
 
 
 
Dear Mr,. re 
 
                I so now woftizW on the final report on the 
north central region, buit a docision on lbr T work next has; be", 
4defe4r for varin reson*.    It  y be .wvhre In ta Tet. 
 
                fthr  is also sooo lwe*l & that *1 W 
aMilable -for gae. suvys my be exkife     Fo one thing, tho 
Bol.ogical S     has as    4 this f  tionm   W.   1 male to 
take on d-r-In the periods Ohe he is not busy sup~wtiwit the 
fellowships. GQ-- is -    mallt     -w6 
 
                This is about as class as I can o     to answeri 
th. quostion you asked Major Waller a4d whic he bat 2o   &ar44 to 
me. I relize that t~his io not the kind of an answer you went, bt 
it is t1W beat I can give at this time.  Some doisIons are bein 
reh     within the next month nWh might nable ms to be mows 
definite. 
 
                I am glad Idaho is Iatereatsd. Wh 4..'4 the 
try to got S. B. Lok  of U$tah, who is alread pirtly familawwith 
Idabo .oaditons, and is in my opinion competent to make a gtun 
 
 
                With bost retards 
 
                                Yours simewsly, 
 
 
 
                            Ili Charge, Gm   u 
 
  

					
				
				
 
      S0a                0 P  Y 
 
 
 
 
                                         Seattle, Washington 
                                            June 20, 1929 
 
 
 
 
 
 Mr. R. E. Thomas, 
 State Game Warden, 
 Boise, Idaho. 
 
 Friend Dick: 
 
                     I have been corresponding with Dr. Green 
 on the tularemia trouble and was referred by him to Dr. R. R. 
 Parker, Special Expert in Charge, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever 
 Laboratory at Hamilton, Montana. 
 
                     In writing to Dr. Parker I advised that 
 there had been some grouse dying off in your state and thought 
 that tularemia was whet had been the trouble. 
 
                     He seems to be very much interested and 
writes to me as follows: 
 
                     "I am very much interested in your 
    statement as to the occurrence of trouble among grouse 
    from the State of Idaho, and would very much appreciate 
    any information you can give me as to locality and the 
    circumstances attendant upon the dying off of the local 
Sgrouse.      I would especially like to know whether or not 
    the dying off of the grouse is coincident with the dying 
    off of jack rabbits in the same area". 
                     "If you should know of anyone in the 
   area concerned who would be willing to send specimens of 
   dead grouse to this Laboratory, I would be very much pleased 
   to have his or her name". 
 
                      I believe it will pay you to keep in 
touch with this man, suggest that you furnish him with the infor- 
mation asked for, as you are familiar with the details. 
 
                            Yours very truly, 
 
 
Earl A. Fry 
 
  

					
				
				
 
,on. .9.10 L 
 
 
Copy to: Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
         421 Chemistury Bldg. (U.W. 
         Madison, Wisoonsin 
 
 
             ESTABUSH ED 1802 
 E.I. Du PONT DE NEMOURS &COMPANY 
               INCORPOPATED 
        SMOKELESS POWDER DEPARTMENT 
        WILMINGTON, DELAWAR E 
 
SPORTING POWDER DIVISION 
 
 
zLWTW # 
 
 
- as;  
 
 
ft 
 
 
I eiv a oq                 fyu lettr% ha ol 
 
        be itoristig t Leoold4" og tar~fresseu~mg iz 
 
  

					
				
				
 
FORM M19 L 
 
 
                ESTABLISHED 1802 
 
    E.I. Du PONT DE NEMOURS & COMPANY 
                 INCORFORATED 
          SMOKELESS POWDER DEPARTMENT 
          WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 
 
 
SPORTING POWDER DIVISION 
 
 
 
 
 
 
      Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
      431 Chemistry Bldg., 
      Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
 
May 39, 1939 
 
 
(U.W.) 
 
 
My dear Leopold:- 
 
 
            The following received from Earl A. Fry and 
 
quoted for your benefit in connection with your future 
 
survey in Idaho:- 
 
      "The same character of waterfowl sickness as found 
      formerly in Utah and prevalent now in Oregon and 
      Northern California has appeared in various parts of 
      Idaho. Most trouble has been found in the American 
      Falls district and some in recent months on the lakes 
      of northern Idaho. 
 
      Thomas reports the American Falls trouble is found 
      mostly in the swamp areas of the/ pvect, this being 
      near the intake where the lake is shallow and where, 
      with the withdrawal of water, there is a lot of pot 
      holes left with stagnant water. He is sending the 
      diseased ducks to laboratories for examination. 
 
 
jI " 
 
 
Extensive dying off of native birds, including the sage 
hens, grouse, etc., is causing some alarm, the trouble 
coming apparently from the tick. These birds are found 
dead with their heads covered with ticks. It is thought 
that death is caused from Tularemia and research work is 
being carried on by the department to find the exact cause 
and the possible cure. 
 
A problem with the deer is before the department at this 
time. A heavy increase has been shown to the extent of 
possible shortage of feeding areas which in turn brings 
up the problem of sheep and cattle grazing on game areas. 
 
Thomas tried to get a bill thru the last legislature allow- 
ing the department to kill off certain numbers of deer 
(this with the permission of the Governor) on areas that were 
becoming too thickly populated. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
-2- 
 
 
"UAn increase in the bag was also asked but both 'Wae 
turned down by the lawmakers. Thomas wished to take 
care of a situation which he claims will possibly equal 
the Kaibab trouble, 
 
Numerous deer have been found dead in the big game dis- 
tricts, the bodies being covered with ticks. The depart- 
ment feels that this has been the cause of many deer (ying 
off and are investigating the trouble. 
 
The use of many tons of sulphurized salt in the big game 
districts has helped materially to keep this trouble down. 
 
The last session of the legislature created several new 
game refuges amounting to approximately one million acres. 
I have added this amount to the last report on acres but 
will not be able to furnish the list of the new refuges 
until some time later.# 
 
 
   -n         sincerely yours, 
 
L. W. T. WALLER, JR. - ASS'T DIRECT 
 
 
LWTW: B 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
                                           March 13, 1929. 
 
 
 
 
Memorandum for A. L.: 
 
           Just on the chance that in your study of game manage- 
 
ment you may some time visit southern Idaho I am jotting down a 
 
few points on the Chinese pheasant and the Hungarian partridge 
 
and I am listing one or two people who I am sure can give you a 
 
lot of valuable information about this country. 
          My ideas are based on conditions that prevailed five 
 
years ago and apply to the counties of Cassia and Twin. Falls. 
 
Burley and Twin Falls are the two main towns in this section. 
 
Both are located in reclamation projects. You can get into this 
 
country best from Pocatello. It is suggested that you stop off 
 
at Burley and see T. J. Hetland, Vice President of the Burley 
 
National Bank, and George Booth, General Freight and Passenger 
 
Agent for the Oregon short line. Both of these men are good 
 
friends of mine and I am sure will open up to you with all the 
 
information they have. They can give you the names of sportsmen 
 
in Twin Falls who will be glad, I am sure, to talk Chinese 
 
pheasant or any other game with you. 
 
           About f*Vt0 years ago when I was President of the Cassia 
 
 Rod and Gun Club some Hungarian partridges were planted on a 
 
 farm of Mr. Baker about three or four miles northwest of Burley. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
I have no information, however, on how well this planting 
 
succeeded. Booth will know about it. There are but few 
 
Chinese pheasants around Burley. There are different ideas 
 
as to why they are not increasing on this reclamation tract, 
 
but it always seemed to me to be due to a lack of running 
 
water and the barrenness of the project during winter. South 
 
of Burley about twenty miles in the foothills is the small 
 
town of Albion. There are quite a number of pheasants in the 
 
vicinity of this settlement. They work up on to the hills, 
 
and I think the people there will tell you that they have 
 
seen them up at an elevation of between 5,000 and 6,000 feet. 
 
Occasionally rangers have reported seeing lone birds off of 
 
the reclamation tracts up in the foothills in the sage brush. 
 
          At Twin Falls the pheasants bound in large numbers 
 
and seem to thrive. This is an older project than at Burley 
 
and has different soil formation. The Burley tract is lo- 
 
cated on an alluvial fan,and bed rock lies at a great distance 
 
from the surface, whereas at Twin Falls and Bu1l the bed rock 
 
is closer with the result that on this tract there are quite 
 
a number of springs and small seeps. There was a jeweler at 
 
Twin Falls,- I have forgotten his name, but Booth can tell you 
 
who he is,- who was very much interested in pheasants. You 
 
would do well to get in touch with him because I think he can 
 
 
-2- 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
give you the history of the pheasant in that section from the 
 
time the reclamation project was created. 
 
 
 
 
 
                              R. D. Garver 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
                            MUNIVERSITY OF IDAHO HAS   ýj, 
                               A GAME DEPARTMENT 
 
     From the Portland, "Oregonian" - "Wild Life Lines"
we quote an account of 
the newly established Poultry Department of the University of Idaho, which
is 
interesting. 
     This University was visited by a du Pont representative last spring
when 
the idea of a game department was in contemplation. A talk with Professor
C. E. 
Lampman, Head of the Department revealed they are primarily interested in
arti- 
ficial raising of game to see whether or not methods can be devised to satisfac-

torily raise game at a cost much less than that now generally obtaining in
com- 
mercial game farms. 
 
           "Artificial hatching of pheasant eggs was carried on as an
experi- 
      ment at the poultry department of the University of Idaho here last
spring. 
      It was demonstrated that the wild birds can be raised artifically when

      given proper environment, according to C. E. Lampman, head of the do-

      Lartment, who had charge of the experiments, working in co-operation
with 
      tne state game department. 
          Last spring a batch of 100 China pheasant eggs were sent to the
uni- 
      versity from the Lapwai game farm. They were set in an incubator and
37 
      hatched. The total mortality from the artificial brooding was only
five, 
      which indicates excellent results for the first trial. bimilar experiments

      will be carried out this spring and it is expected that methods of
arti- 
      ficial inoubation and brooding will be found that can be used successfully

      at the state game farm at Lapwai to greatly increase the output. -

 
  

					
				
				
 
                                         Fuel BUTfA3. 
                                               Idaho- 
 
 
 
 
Minals *ef tho bse Rio~to (1924#) ft Idaho bT WilliAm B. Davis. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
560 
 
 
             "The American game policy, adopted last December. urging
that 
       landowners be compensated for raising game, is credited by conser-

       vation leaders for the movement to make wild-life production a farm

       industry, catering to the demand of sportsmen for better hunting.

       Reports from Illinois reveal how Illinois farmers sought to reclaim

       swamp and waste land areas for farming purposes, and now the 
       pendelum is swinging the other way to the benefit of themselves, 
       sportsmen and wild life.  Progressive farmers are even building 
       dams to restore swamps, finding more profit in rentingofishing and

       shooting privileges to sportsmen." - Evening Transcript, Boston,

       Mass. 
 
 
 
            EXCELLENT WORK BY THE MONTANA SPORTSMEN'S ASSOCIATION 
 
 
      We are in receipt of a report showing the excellent work being accom-

plished by the Montana Sportsmen's Association through B. F. Gerry, its Sec-

retary. 
      Among other things, this report shows that in the period from January
9th 
to April 9th, this Association sponsored 26 showings of moving pictures and

talks on game conservation to a total of 6066 pupils of schools and to more

than 6252 grownups in general public audiences. This makes more than a total

of 12,318 listeners, which is considered most excellent coverage considering

the distances in the State of Montana and the total population. On the basis

of total population it would appear that this figures to 2.3% of their popula-

tion, and it will be realized how good this showing is, when we consider
that 
if a similar percentage from the State of New York had been reached by a

sportsmen's association, it would have amounted to 2,895,255 persons. 
      Mr. Gerry reports that this work is being continued, he already having

9 positive and over 40 tentative dates for the months of May and June. 
 
 
 
 
                        CANADA VALUES HER WILD LIFE 
 
 
            "Wild animal life of Canada has a capital valuation of 
      $1,000,000,000 and means a yearly business turnover to the Dominion

      of about $45,000,000.   This valuation includes the fur harvest, 
      game fish and the manufacture of firearms and fishing tackle."
- 
      Calgary Herald. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                 XXTABLISXKD  10B 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
561 
                         WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE STUDYING 
                         AFFLICTION OF SWANS IN THE WEST 
 
 
               "Sportsmen of northern Idaho, says our Moscow, Idaho,
corres- 
         pondent, are becoming alarmed over the appearance of many sick and

         dead swan of the North American whistling species, a beautiful and

         graceful bird that is becoming nearly extinct. Many of these water

         fowl are being found daily in the Coeur d'Alene river valley and
in 
         the Thompson lake district. 
               E. 0. Cathcart of the Kootenai county game commission has

         five of the swans in an improvised hospital at his ranch near 
         Harrison and the sick birds are recovering slowly. A few weeks ago

         74 swans were counted in that part of Idaho. Mr. Cathcart and 
         Federal Game Protector Ransom of Spokane made a trip to Thompson

         lake and found 40 swans on that body of water. They noticed a dead

         swan and two that were very sick. The sick birds were taken to the

         veterinary hospital at Washington State college for treatment and

         were soon revived when given fresh water and food. They were than

         taken to the Whitman county game farm. An autopsy is being made
on 
         the dead swan and as soon as the veterinarian's report is received

         steps will be taken to care for other incapacitated swans in the

         district. 
               Lack of food, vermin and lice in the waters frequented by
the 
         swans and poisoning of the water by lead are three possible reasons

         advanced by Mr. Cathcart for their condition. But wild rice was

         planted in that part of Idaho three years ago and thousands of wild

         ducks and other water fowl are living there, so the food theory
is 
         not considered a likely cause of the trouble. 
               I have fished and hunted in the Coeur d'Alenes and if my ex-

         perience in that country is of any account I would unhesitatingly

         say that the swans were victims of lead poisoning. The mines of

         the Coeur d'Alenes empty their tailings into the rivers and creeks

         of the region. These tailings are heavily charged with lead, and

         the water in some of the rivers and creeks becomes so thick and

         murky that no fish or other water creature can possibly live in
it. 
               Spring freshets cause this lead water to overflow on adjoin-

         ing lands and hay raised on such areas is so saturated with the
lead 
         that domestic stock die when they eat it. It seems only natural
to 
         suppose that a swan would share the same fate. But, of course, I

         can't explain why the lead impregnated forage, doesn't also kill

         the ducks. Maybe their stomachs are constituted so that they can

         eat the vegetation and drink the water and still throw off the ef-

         fects of the lead poisoning". - Oregonian, Portland, Oregon.

 
 
 
 
 
  I~Q ~ J 
 
  

					
				
				
 
                  Schgol                                   Idaho 
Extract from Clinton Notes 
 
 
              R   ed QrQoee  at Rockland, Idaho. Became very scarce in 
1925 or 6. Plentiful in 24 or 25. Sage hen in same years. Now visible 
a pick-up in the sage hen. 
 
  

					
				
				
Idaho 
 
 
Extract from Clinton School notes, 1929 
 
 
V. H. Dahlen, Clinton School 
 
 
 
              True Prairie Chicken,also sharptail, from Rexburg down to the

 
desert in Idaho. Drifted in--not native. 
 
 
               His father is with game department. C. F. Dehlen. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Cross Referinces 
 
 
(Idaho Ad. Dope) 
               7 
 
 
1. "Pires and Torest Succession in the Bitterroot Mountains of N-1orthern

    Idaho" by J. A. Larsen, Iowa State College; in ECOLOGY, paeb7, 
    January, 1929, Vol. X., No. 1. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
                    INTRODUCTION OF TIE- CHUKALR I1II,. IDAHIO  Cef4 
 
          The development of the Chukar partridge for a field bird in the
north- 
west is rapidly being realized, the various state game departments making
rapid 
strides in the propagation of this interesting bird. 
 
          Mr. James Marshall, Superintendent of the Idaho State Game Farm
at 
Lapwai is looking forward to be one of the first in the northwest to make
a 
liberation of this bird that they may make a start in Idaho. 
 
                               BOUNTY FRAUD 
 
          During June, 1931, bounty was paid on 2 wild cats, 91 gray foxes
and 
845 weasels, entailing an expenditure of $1,239. During June, 1930, bounty
was 
paid on 2 wild cats, 68 gray foxes and 1,407 weasels, entailing an expenditure

of $1,709. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
   /ý 3f             INTRODUCTION OF THE CHUKAR IN IDAHO 
 
       The development of the Chukar partridge for a field bird in the North-

west is rapidly being realized, the various state game departments making

rapid strides in the propagation of this interesting bird. 
       James Marshall, superintendent of the Idaho State Game Farm at Lapwai

 is looking forward to be one of the first in the Northwest to make a libera-

. tion of this bird that they may make a start in Idaho. 
        Marshall is very enthusiastic over his success with the Chukar, report-

  ing that the bird has proven very easy to raise and with their apparent
hard- 
  iness should prove as good a bird for Idaho as the ringneck or Hungarian.

        Starting this year with seven hens he has been able to set 255 eggs,

  these being placed under hens for hatching. Up to May 23rd he had placed
154 
  eggs in the first setting, 127 of which hatched. From this hatching from
six 
  days to six weeks of age he only had a loss of five birds. 
        Marshall's observations have brought out the following facts concerning

  the Chukar; they are polygamous, very pugnacious -- he has found that he
can- 
  not allow two cock birds in a pen together-very hardy, chick birds seem
to 
  take care of themselves much better than the pheasant, and very prolific.

  Comparing their native habitat with that of Idaho, Mr. Marshall expects
them 
  to thrive once they get a start in his state. He expects to liberate at
least 
  175 of these birds this year. 
        The Idaho state farm is in excellent condition and they expect to
liber- 
  ate between five and six thousand pheasants this year. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
* fts 10amss bmro UA"s a ea saton. tovos) 
tS ftsm (theQw fts **- Itrogs aS 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  I.IdrcMsfIVAN "a to ofec an   2a aS~ 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  fi*t of~ t leat 12 &Wt -o a  I .a. pote of2 W* 
 
 
 
  .b~atotimu  o pia dest~trutio. 
 
 
     ague   1 W ell Kvb 
 
     is  ~s -. an carrmie Las mtnW*. 
 
 
 
  p"Jost Ir utomwa N"* &~ low xom swtisa 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   lb-~ -a= MUV t.U 
 
 
 
 
 
 ft *AI   d ~t-~          a~I 
 Ilf 40mau  £v Ovnl46m   A  a  et * 
 -at 
 periodI.~t~I     ~*w1t 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
blogigs. o b*toresW is OW.1~ Imtutm  f roerat 
lb    V o      If. 
    potorbotle It poa ea  WM  osrigt  a 
"MU OI-.    &k-nf       frxmo 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
hetw fsea"a t o mam or wlas. MGwIklmw 
 
 
   Ar,**r    At obAN ea Al v as$o 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   "me iosu to e atedm w  Pon ue"1 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 sloe to b  me"W  mad wa~  1We Ii os t.~  w 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1*eso W go**"L. SOJ ft twammt"IWsh and 
 
 
-3- 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3-3ta $Uties e~s# lm* Owtlm b 
 
  Jm booot teLrot  I~*I S"  last eettwN r 
  4wost U~ is*&  no~rt..  fr#m  *&o  ~~ at 
 
       cler Su*  e& ofredaV 
 
as.tNU-- M# t 
  Sw~r1i orwr U  luVOrdusWMt tMe 
  aproimjoy16wih atl aon#N  it *t * and obp  d3  l 
 
 
.14. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
     RAND M'NALLY 
LETTER SIZE OUTLINE MAP 
 
       IDAHO 
 
             SCALE 
Copyright by Ranod MNaIly & Company, Chicago 
          MADE I'V If. 3. A. 
 
 
The Low Prohibits Copying or Reproduction by Any Process for Persomal Us*
Or Resulet 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
"7           116                                                   
              I" 
 
 
       CRAM'S 
 
 8kx 11 Outline Map 
 
      IDAHO 
         SJCALE 
   0   to C Ag    .4.. 
        COPYRIGHT 
THE GEORGE F CRAM COMPANY 
       INDIANAPOLIS 
 
 
441 
 
 
117 
 
 
116 
 
 
tit 
 
 
451 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
     DEPARTMENT OF                                                     BOARD
OF NATURAL RESOURCES 
REGISTRATION AND EDUCATION                                              
  AND CONSERVATION 
FRANK G. THOMPSON. DIRECTOR                                             FRANK
G. THOMPSON. CHAIRMAN 
       SPRINGFIELD                                                     BIOLOGY
    CARL G. HARTMAN 
                                                                       FORESTRY
     EZRA J. KRAUS 
                                                                       GEOLOGY
    NORMAN L. BOWEN 
                                                                       ENGINEERING
LOUIS R. HOWSON 
                                                                       CHEMISTRY
 . - ROGER ADAMS 
                                        STATE OF ILLINOIS              UNIVERSITY
OF ILLINOIS- 
                                     DWIGHT H. GREEN. GOVERNOR          
 PRESIDENT. GEORGE D. STODDARD 
                     STATE NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY DIVISION 
                                    LEO R. TEHON, ACTING CHIEF 
                                           URBANA 
                                                              November 15,
1946 
 
 
 
 
           Prof. Aldo Leopold 
           Department of Wildlife Management 
           The University of Wisconsin 
           College of Agriculture . 
           424 University Farm Place 
           Madison, Wisconsin 
 
 
           Dear Prof. Leopold: 
 
                      I am most heartily in sympathy with the interest you
ex- 
            pressed in your letter of November 8 regarding the Green River
Area 
            and its present and future management. 
 
                      When the problem of the area was presented to me this
summer 
            I found it already pretty much a case of an accomplished deed.
It ap- 
            peared that this area, after having been purchased, had for various

            reasons been subjected to circumstances not conducive to the
conserva- 
            tion of wildlife; for example, repeated accidental or intentionAburning

            over. Also, at some time, perhaps more than two years ago, pheasants

            had been released on or near the area and had established themselves

            there more or less successfully. Whatever may have been the intention

            with regard to the area at the time that its purchase was suggested,

            it apparently remained a fact that nothing constructive had been
done 
            and that,in genera). circumstances persisting through several
years had 
            tended toward destructiveness. 
 
                      Last summer Mr. Hawkins, Dr. Yeatter, Mr. Wandell,
and I had 
            a prolonged conference with one member of the State Department
of Con- 
            servation. Several viewpoints were presented very strongly at
that 
            conference and the net result of the conference was that, so
far as the 
            Natural History Survey was concerned, we were assured of and
would get 
            the best protection for prairie chickens that we could devise
consider- 
            ing the uses to which the Department of Conservation desired
to put a 
            portion of the area. 
 
 
                                           Sincerely yours, 
 
 
 
 
 
                                           Acting Chief 
 
 
LRT/GCJ 
 
  

				
      
      
				
				
 
sawhr * 04 
 
 
       I~~ ~ ~ mja~esk hsiswt  ww  wm~- WA -t 
 
It msc or iamb -.Ww*O h  M1   W#AVNO 
Ope     *%&M 
 
 
 
 
     It ~ ~~~~ 04. ". AA (JW W  thA C-0IO1t4*O 
2u*erb   X46om I' .di U0  is V thnhawooS" 
 
 
 
 
  of ~ (~ t~ am  pi*lvw.T loml ahiohApoVo 
 
 
Dr. Up A. T*014 AOUM MW 
nuAA* iý,huut matow 3wrow 
Ur*W&S nawAs , 
 
1*%r ý)rv Telms 
 
 
I ha" U000 hOU'UW wl th Al 
wilt thfk 111"m ;ay"Ir krmft* 
pv-%UU ahi*m W004"* 
       to a ýUute 
 
 
ýl 
 
  

					
				
				
 
     DEPARTMENT OF                                                    BOARD
OF NATURAL RESOURCES 
REGISTRATION AND EDUCATION 
FRANK G. THOMPSON, DIRECTOR                                            FRANK
G. THOMPSON. CHAIRMAN 
       SPRINGFIELD                                                    BIOLOGY
    CARL G. HARTMAN 
                                                                      FORESTRY
     EZRA J. KRAUS 
                                                                      GEOLOGY
    NORMAN L. BOWEN 
                                                                      ENGINEERING
    LOUIS R. HOWSON 
                                                                      CHEMISTRY
-    ROGER ADAMS 
                                        STATE OF ILLINOIS             UNIVERSITY
OF ILLINOIS- 
                                     DWIGHT H. GREEN. GOVERNOR          
 PRESIDENT. ARTHUR C. WILLARD 
                     STATE NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY DIVISION 
                                   LEO R. TEHON. ACTING CHIEF 
                                          URBANA 
 
 
 
 
                               4'% ~/ 
 
 
 
 
                          _ .,/A-.-fb- 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                    A-_-. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                          ,_:.          W 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                     Vk 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                AA tj 
 
  

					
				
				
 
a.,      L- 
 
 
           §1/ 
A-'7  / 
 
 
-'                               - 
 
 
/ 
 
A- 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IL7 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                  44 Unvrst rare Pl~ace 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr. A. L.Is%* 
Chiew Ill im.s 
 
Oft Mr. btsioe 
 
       First. I wat totan     o and Mr. hkst. for you v 
 
 
 
 
 
       the w5* aut S41   I metoe a    iig an* p..nber~tn histM3 
 
  taiage  tu2 pxrdVel 10%tht     opnsotat Mr. 3wdu ama, Mr. 
  Becb&    cold diget qu*tfqo    of d**9td2 at *t1ir 14w.ur.  After 
  the have had time, to a*"over tho deatll4 quetloin, a sour plea 
  Is no~t  senin a9 coyo.seoD.qejs t       o   i 
 
kno tba we had a good di    elmouan. d tha    ata mie  avn him with 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                      ?"fosor of Wildlif Moemn 
 
 
cc Pirnie 
  Hawkins 
  Hochbaum 
 
  

					
				
				
 
            A. L.EuSTICE 
            2717 GREENVIEW AVENUE 
              CHICAGO 
 
                     &W"    .0 00 
 
 
 
 
 
Door Mr vokuss 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   vis to mo "~ Ithe ftt4  "**r 
 md  I    "% - gkrr*V* to b~ hefmo 
 
 
 *2. I4r ftes 'aw             SaGvot Si be4i**1" 
 
 
 al it 3fua  uabmsoU 
 
 
I / 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                              Septber 3, 190 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr. Roberts Xmsa 
arest Preseve District of Cok  outy 
Oaig     Square 
River lorest, I1llnois 
 
Doea Mr. Ham 
 
         I am gla you finally got Sperry to look at yor rond 
and? I-s pleasatly eawprived at the list of sieaes he found. I 
was near Barrington yesterd&7 and was ased at the sowin of prairie 
flowers on the O. I. W. P ritf-v. You could doubtlles a*% 
a certain amount of stock from. the rw1-f-va withadt hurting It any. 
 
         Swuld like to a       teyo    in the atter ofthe hio 
spe~h   but I an alrea4 badly overloaded with speehes and cannot 
unertake another one for some time to come. I have one speech to 
give om the exat da, Septeber 23, *tich you mention. 
 
         I m    a that Mr. Steen  pres   hielf tavorably abot the 
use of Pittinp-Robartson t1has for the tumeck beg, &a   I an letting

Water Scott of or Department kow of this eaUionml indication of 
   3jolica Suve   pproval. 
 
                                  Sice~rely your*, 
 
 
 
 
                                       Aldo Lesopol 
                               Professor of Wildlife Maagment 
 
 
0. W. it. Scott 
 
  

					
				
				
 
  /  COMMISSIONERS                                                      GE.NRAL
HEADQUARTERS 
                                                                        
536 NO. HARLEM AVE. 
CLAYTON F. SMITH                                                        
 CUMMINGS SQUARE 
   PRESIDENT                         PRIVER FOREST, 
FRANK BOBRYTZKE          FOREST PRESERVE DISTRICT                       
     ILLINOIS 
WILLIAM BUSSE 
H. WALLACE CALDWELL                                                     
    TELEPHONES 
MRS. ELIZABETH A. CONKEY         OF   COOK    COUNTY                   COLUMBUS
8400-FOREST 4470 
WILLIAM N. ERICKSON 
FRED FISCHMAN 
PETER FOSCO                                    OSLEGAL DEPARTMENTS 
MAURICE F. KAVANAGH                                                     
    ROOM 335 
MARY McENERNEY                                                          
  COUNTY BUILDING 
GEORGE A. MILLER                                                        
     CHICAGO, 
GEORGE F. NIXON                                                         
     ILLINOI 
                                                                        
     ILLINOIS 
DANIEL RYAN 
EDWARD M. SNEED                                                         
    TELEPHONE 
JOHN E. TRAEGER                                                         
  FRANKLIN 3000 
                               CHARLES G. SAUERS, GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT

 
 
                                                          River Forest, Ill.,

                                                          August 30, 1940.

 
 
 
          Professor Aldo Leopold, 
          University of Wisconsin, 
          Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
          Dear Professor Leopold: 
 
                    Dr. Sperry was down bore Saturday and we went over all
the likely 
          locations for a prairie restoration project. The one which I had
in the back 
          of my mind proved to be ideal, according to him. 
 
                    I enclose a copy of the list of the flora which we found
growing 
          there, which he just sent me. I also enclose a copy of my request
to our 
          Chief Engineer for his assignment to special service in our preserves,
in 
          order to set up a lrairie restoration project. 
 
                    I just received a letter from A. T. Tomasek, Assistant
Director of 
          the Department of Conservation of Illinois, which reads in part
as follows: 
 
                         "I have your letter regarding the tamarack
swamp near 
               Volo. It sounds very interesting and the next time I am in
the 
               northern part of the state I think we should look it over.
I dont 
               know just when this will be but it should be within the next
month. 
               I would do it over Labor Day, however, I have just learned
that I 
               must attend an educational conference in Michigan and am leaving

               next Thursday. 
                         "Steen, the Biological Survey inspector of
Pittman- 
               Robertson projects, was here last week and also a fellow named

               Kessler from the Washington Office. I showed them your letter
and 
               they thought it might be an interesting area". 
 
                    I sm working with not only Mr. Robert Kingery of the
Chicago Regional 
          Planning Association, but also the frIidds of Our Native Landscape,
another 
          group interested in the preservation of such areas as this Volo
swamp. I have 
          pretty fair hopes of getting it into state ownership. The thing
that scared me 
          was the ditch that had been dug tirough the peat into the Tamarack
swamp. 
 
                    I wonder if you would consider addressing the Akron (Ohio)
Garden Club 
          on the evening of Monday September 23rd on "Conservation"*
They have been having 
          a lot of trouble in Ohio and Mrs. Mary Kinsey, State Conservation
Chairman for 
 
  

					
				
				
 
-2- 
 
 
the Ohio Federation ct Women's Clubs, and a particular friend of mine, had
me 
booked to talk to them on this subject* It was to be a feature meeting of
the 
year with all the bigahots of Ohio in attendarce. They wanted to pay no my

expenmes and an honorarium* I declined the honorarium because I expected
to 
attend the convention cf the American Institute of Park Executives in Cleveland

that week. Because of a combination of circumstances connected with my personal

affairs and our Forest Preserve business, I have been obliged to cancel this

engagement. Mrs. Kinsey is very much perturbed. I told her I would help her

get someone much better than I. 
 
          Would you consider the trip end the address if they paid your ex-

penses and fee? 
 
 
                                               Sincerely yours, 
 
 
IRM/j id 
 
  

					
				
				
 
      Afua Ut -14 
 
ar arsX1 
 
   8"% 4cI 
         P0200t-                        -~t" 
khv    -ot 1210 
 
 
& 
 
So 
 
 
"JO (**010ie "nwwn VI& 
 
 
U. 
2. 
 
 
M. 
we 
 
no 
a. 
-p 
N. 
 
 
l* Aso Lww~ 
20s.~l s"U 
 
 
  on"    -u 
mwavi Dke 
 
 
A04"KLM VIVU41W& 
9ft  to PSIMIa 
107schn 7494folihn 
*moor" virglimm T" "12"04"Is 
jKlinthus t**Zo*W 
1"W"s 02m4a 
IMT"=& o""Aa 
PMMkAdM i**frU*IIIft 
ft" bol"* 
xodbodda hivu 
5120bim 
 
 
"now ww" 
V*Xbm& NBOWKU 
TOCILON" 4 114 &*a" a 
 
 
A" t1anal JM"* 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
         re a"U rtroo Us  *lsta I  -~u wm   UIMoa 
Ia   -mo -eft Ixm  -a  o  azlwi0lu I  m  mr  ka  h 
 
 
is4 sbd    X#BP 
 
 
PvKiA40 WAUZLAMW* , 
y2ftivio II&SLV9 "GWO- 
PMIAS blazi  star* 
Okwdlwa fLoww* 
PYOU46 Swaxte" via%* 
 
 
III IM i 01111111 Im, 
 
 
     41 @Bob 
 
Zabel" SWOMLaWLIS 
WO 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
IJORUT PRWz WTMCTO (rO   OM 
 
 
                       -oo Ooo- 
 
 
 
         Cbse Co Notes, Chief Inier 
 
 
         I wish you would =aft a reest to Dn Littl for 
X, 5porx, a forman lIn the University Par Cam  P-14s Madio., Wisonin 
t be lae to uus on spiecialee fow a pewi not t exced.d 
f  t  "     of sett1in u a paie restoration pje  in  Foret 
 
 
        Ipt     ipp of Wisconsin an Profes  Lonenk  of the 
 
Dr* VW   f  e Uy of       U1  , bot of w - a- 
$witte on botay adthe resratima. o prairies, Drperr ban bowerngage 
tow 3 or 4 yers, pehp -rý ia a pril restortin prjet oland    we 
bthe W? I7 of i                at M4Lsoni 
 
        Sper -i 4s her Saura an toure aU the l1I~y locat~c 
with y    fti e a   M     Wo     an    I s* n Dvi   I   that 
big pr~i east of th ww   ~  *   rees of th U  Plai-s River, opoite 
I     an4 mt of       o AW; ex      f        Aveu to ce 
ofIM  WBgs. Ibi ara Is rot~ onyIe~ ute      mwao     ow to* 
grase an neest  I fc tee In ow anl   ranl    h reMoats the 
opivn we ih expet  Th jrent loato of th utya. foet wa will 
not effet th pril resbtora Im &  auMo andup el . bowve, strongy 
r   m   t  p  s  of the aditin    be    the laber aly and M1i - 
SAvenu      It wol also bec   r to wkv             t  d- 
sinr at the fbret wa to Insur tht the prope dringe canitmwi neesr 
for thi jmirl* woul not be unuy  utmabI. 
 
       Suc a projet woul be set up tor belusot  p anmold ut~il~e 
 
"5ry~s attention tor 3 or 4 yeam~ Althug little wor would be eird 
after the f Irt woar or yea and a half  It wcul be ncsayto s3ilot "oft

        an pans brsoin ad raspanin*It woul be neesr to eii*c scalp 
     plce fr rnslatigandsedn or to p~ 1W          at Interal. 
Thr  sn movn - r ow ther labor Involved as I unertand It, exep tb culti-

vation of cerai plants and raisin seed In a tin nursr, 
 
       *p'ert triing would make hma availabl for aber vr. possbly 
asistin the Foestry Deatmn ow in landscape deeomns when he was nt 
reie in connection vGih th pli~e restoration. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr. Itbrts Ua 
Oook Omati 7lost ?owv. Distvit* 
Quingus Square 
River or.t, Illiaois 
 
,r Mr- . Maus 
 
         I ws      inerested  n t   pr, oposal 
to apply Pitts    Wtna funds t the p        of 
refuges containing~ rare plants. Itso happn    that 
we have just loset out on the vlwl~e Grove prairie 
area  and if P     hbw-o~otso. funds had been avai1- 
able the otooe aight have beon different. If 
sucooee in getting an O.K. from the Bioo1gical Daqe 
I woud   eciate your lottin   e  ow, sice I 
thin  the prednt woul be of    mt Irtawe, 
         With best re  s, 
 
                       Si~oeres y younr, 
 
 
 
                            Aldo LeopeU 
                    Professor of Wildlife 11m.maet1 
 
  

					
				
				
 
     COMMISSIONt.Z 
CLAYTON F. SMITH 
  S PRESIDENT 
FRANK BOBRYTZKE 
WILLIAM BUSSE 
H. WALLACE CALDWELL 
MRS. ELIZABETH A. CONKEY 
WILLIAM N. ERICKSON 
FRED FISCHMAN 
PETER FOSCO 
MAURICE F. KAVANAGH 
MARY McENERNEY 
GEORGE A. MILLER 
GEORGE F. NIXON 
DANIEL RYAN 
EDWARD M. SNEED 
JOHN E. TRAEGER 
 
 
FOREST PRESERVE DISTRICT 
 
        OF COOK COUNTY 
 
               ILLINOIS 
 
                    .O 6 se 
 
 
  GENERAL HEADQUARTERS 
    CUMMINGS SQUARE 
    RIVER FOREST. 
        ILLINOIS 
      TELEPHONES 
COLUMBUS 8400-FOREST 4470 
 
    REAL ESTATE AND 
    LEGAL DEPARTMENTS 
    COUNTY BUILDING 
       CHICAGO. 
       ILLINOIS 
       TELEPHONE 
     FRANKLIN 3000 
 
 
CHARLES G. SAUERS, GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT 
 
 
Professor Aldo Leopold, 
University of Wisconsins 
Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
 
River Forest, Ill., 
August 16, 1940. 
 
               VU     I 
 
 
Dear Professor Leopold: 
 
           I have a letter from Dr. Sperry stating that he has been away
on 
 vacation, and that Professor Longenecker is still away on vacation. Dr.

 Sperry suggests that I work through Don Littrell, who is National Park Ser-

 vice Inspector for Illinois, and get authority for Sperry to visit our hold-

 ings from Inspeetor Tripp of Wisconsin. This I propose to do. 
 
           Dr. Sperry also suggests that be make an informal inspection next

Satarday, August 24th. I am writtng him to come ahead. 
 
           I enclose a copy of my letter to A. ;. Toasek, former State Forester

and now Assistant Director of the Department of Conservation. Tomy used to

work for us before he went with the National Park Service.     This Volo
bog is 
certainly a darbot And I am going to keep on pitching until we get it into

state owmership. 
 
          While at Havana last Saturday and Sunday, Lynn Hutehans and I spent

considerable time with Hawkins and with Bradley, the Custodian of the Chatauqua

Lae Reservation of the Biological Survey. We set up an association of the

bird banders in Illinois (vhldi I suggested be called the Bird Banders Bund;

its insignia to be a duck's penis rampant)* Beckart of Barrington was due
there 
on Monday, but I could not stay. We got the nesurients and sketches of the

dusk traps they are using down there and I have already started construction

on three of them to be placed in MoGinnes Slough at en early date, so that
we 
can catch the teal migration. We propose to weigh, age and sex all the birds

caught. Hawkins feels that we can make a considerable contribution by adding

this banding station. We will tranmit our records to him at Chatauqua weekly.

 
 
C      fly yoursa 
  berts Ma 
Supt, of Maintenance. 
 
 
V., 
 
 
RA/ j 3d 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I~A. z. I~mW AmuDt 
XKL11 # 
 
 
s2 i; 4w a 
DO CW 
=   x~m *Pa a . 41W INuo ihk aemo wWlmf o~ 
   atno bb~,4 a* -ub amml Jse .vo 0utm* 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   WA finll rmo  ud   usI ,ý -  m ,be  hs  s--%NW  0o  r 
 
 
        soo*.      t h* WM -f adV MS 
 W4"    -o M~oI pl  t si uv~."~ sasawta 
M"   -  tofN MU46 ots  Is smo malyf 11 ,d be 
  IxWp=avd s u        otW4 *bw mc 
     tb     W o UU vis ".vWW&ft*3* t Imum 
  us dM        £M. 
  boWs"kwo o" f m 4mgato"tb*o*%b W o 
*a* bun  at U1 b"  a"  dom~  Sam 414810  smbI4 a15wm  A 
mml  j- -   O* sd   to U&W&ItJS*.o eMxSft~foIt"1  W 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     I p"gta- v 4 in 3 Esm anV  w nd*  * o 
.amcu ut Sasm 'arodala boa  ixt" t ofthe - 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
D* mR. nOP 
 
  

					
				
				
 
    S .ePARTMENT OF                                          BOARD OF NATURAL
RESOURCES 
REGISTRATION AND EDUCATION                                      AND CONSERVATION

JOHN J. HALLIHAN. DIRECTOR                                    JOHN J. HALLIHAN,
CHAIRMAN 
      SPRINGFIELD                                            BIOLOGY - WILLIAM
TRELEASE 
                                                             FORESTRY 
                                                             GEOLOGY    EDSON
S. BASTIN 
                                                             ENGINEERING
 LOUIS R. HOWSON 
                                                             CHEMISTRY  -
 WILLIAM A. NOYES 
                                   STATE OF ILLINOIS         UNIVERSITY Of
ILLINOIS- 
                                HENRY HORNER, GOVERNOR       PRESIDENT ARTHUR
C. WILLARD 
                  STATE NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY DIVISION 
                              THEODORE H. FRISON. CHIEF 
                                     URBANA 
                                                            Faville Grove

                                                            August 15, 1940

 
 
 
  Dear Aldo: 
 
             Sorry to have missed seeing you before you left for Delta. 
  The important developments I wired about had to do with our Coopwrative

  Delta-Illinois plan which we discussed at our last meeting. 
 
             I stopped at the A. L. Eustice farm near Barrington and later

  had Mr. Rustice's waterfowl man spend two days with me at Havana. Result:

  All seems to be ripe for our proposed joint conference with Mr. Eustice

  and outline to him a program similar to that which you have outlined for

  Delta. 
 
             Mr. Eustice seems to be a second Mr. Bell. (Pirnie knows him

  well and could verify or disagree with my conclusion.) He is very wealthy,

  extremely interested in ducks, and willing to spend big money on ducks.

  He employs a very good man, Carlton Beckhart (not college-trained, but
of 
  the Peter Ward calibre), who spends full time in caring for the water-

  fowl and ornamental game birds. Beckhart banded nearly 1500 ducks on 
  their fifty-acre lake last year, goes to Wilson Club, etc; meetings, 
  went on the Lyon gull-banding expedition, and is anxious (and capable)

  of cooperating with us one hundred per cent. 
 
  To         To return to Mr. Eustice a minute: He donated that snow 
  mobile and a special aeroplane to the Byrd expedition at an estimated 
  cost of upwards of a quarter million, so you see he has funds. Despite

  his wealth, he is a hard-working business man who enjoys nothing better

  than spending Sundays sitting by the hour looking at the ducks. He 
  has read Pirnie's "Waterfowl Management" and visited Ptrnie.
Pirnie 
  has been tD his place several times. I lent him my copy of "Game LE

  Management" because of his interest in literature of that type. 
 
             You may be surprised to learn after all I've said about Mr.

  Eustice that I never met him personally. My authority is Beckhart, 
  but we discussed his boss's traits so thorougily that I'll be much 
  disappointed if he is not all I have said of him. 
 
             I am nov thinking of the Eustice set-up as a possible American

  duplication of the Delta set-up. I think Mr. Eustice is the type who 
  wants a detailed and concrete plan with reasons. If it looks good to 
  him, I suspect he might sink ;10,000 quick as a wink. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
    a'PARrMENT OF                                             BOARD OF NATURAL
RESOURCES 
                                                                   AND CONSERVATION

REGISTRATION AND EDUCATION                                         AN CO
NSERVAIO N 
JOHN J. HALLIHAN, DIRECTOR                                      JOHN J. HALLIHAN.
CHAIRMAN 
      SPRINGFIELD                                              BIOLOGY -
WILLIAM TRELEASE 
                                                               FORESTRY 
                                                               GEOLOGY  
  EDSON S. BASTIN 
                                                               ENGINEERING
LOUIS R. HOWSON 
                                                               CHEMISTRY
 WILLIAM A. NOYES 
                                    STATE OF ILLINOIS       UNIVERSITY OF
ILLINOIS- 
                                                                   PRESIDENT
ARTHUR C. WILLARD 
                                  HENRY HORNER. GOVERNOR 
                   STATE NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY DIVISION 
                               THEODORE H. FRISON. CHIEF 
                                      URBANA 
                                        -2-                    August 15,
1940 
 
 
             I suggest that we meet with Mr. Eustice soon, preferably the

  day after Labor Day, at his Barrington farm. In fact, Mr. Beckhart is 
  ready to set a date with Mr. Eustice the minute I hear from you that 
  September 3 is O.K. Could we get together September 1 or -2 in case 
  the third suits you for the Barrington meeting. 
 
             As I said before, Pirnie and Mr. Eustice are on friendly 
  terms. I'll leave it up to you whether or not you want Pirnie at the 
  Barrington conference. If you say "yes", I could stop in and
arrange 
  it with Pirnie on my return from the East, about August 30. Should 
  we also have Dr. Frison attend the meeting? If so, you, Pirnie, Dr. 
  Frison, and I could go into a huddle before talking to Mr. Eustice. 
  (Mr. Eustice doesn't return from his Chicago office until late afternoon).

 
             Please write me as soon as you turn the matter over in your

  mind a bit. My address until August 25, c/o John R. Hawkins, Hendrick 
  Avenue, Manands, N.Y. 
 
             Best regards to the boys and Joan. 
 
                                                   Sincerely, 
 
 
 
                                                   Art 
 
 
       .~ ýze V 
  400%%, 7~ 9&   ~ 
 
 
4~~~~ a44  Z' 
 
 
4k24.4-% 
       J 
 
 
 4ZA- -/0 
 
 
;00p?ý           C- 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                         424 Vaiverity rar Plesoc 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Xr. Iro 0. Aass 
1101 third Street 
Poin,'Od, Wisconsi 
 
DerIr 
 
         Artla  -t here the oter dA and Yeygarul 
of*red to tur overt us for you      survival1 pape  te weigt 
data on a bww: of pheasats liberated Qstolor12 1P3S, on 
Us Crystal Lake Club, Rendersa Omty      Zllmois, and &hot 
fwtri Xoema* . th, 1"s or gai  In wight is5 Ishw ints 
  atacedopy of Artrs notes.       I am roann his original 
notibok to him. 
 
         ~Arthur4 also  maven  thestomach aontes of the*# 
birds at the time t     Vora M~ld. toete with the stozah 
wmtaits of wild phesats kil* at the sam place wa         ti.., 
I siaholin  these until you got hers. 
 
         The notabok record, by th    a, alao include* the 
w***gt of wild phesats killed. 
 
                             Sinerely your*, 
 
 
 
 
                                 Aldo Leool 
      anti               Professor .t Wildlifea  ano.uit 
 
  

					
				
				
Owy.al Lek*e C1ub 
    Illiaeos 
 
 
3&3A  Whee  I 
NO-  M IAM 
 
 
    62   -1 
M~ 0-1 
 
Native W-4 
resale 
 
 
p 
S 
U 
 
N 
 
 
 
 
n/,n 
 
 
Native 
 
Native 
 
 
6238 
Native 
 
 
        0-1 
MNatve  "a 
 
 
       South 
 
 
7.Leope14 
 
 
Y.Leq4Al 
 
 
 
 
 
PMla 
S.ch 
 
 
1309-5   1 36.T    16a 
 
1526.j   1   .07    7. 
 
1416.o 
 
 
37.1 
 
 
1396.2   1323-7     7 
 
     1441T  IT- 5  191.2 
  ~ 11T701 
 
 
1140.3 
'1341-7 
 
 
1301.7 
1550.9 
 
 
142o.0 
14N.0, 
1209.5 
 
1W2. 0 
 
 
  4.6 
  94.9 
 
 
 
115.3 
 
 
Smaqs 'tal kWlles 2 pheasats (14 
         Total er.ppled 10 
 
 
UtrAod, 8 native co , I native he, I sataut) 
 
 
Av. weight of 14 p-aed eooks - 1256.7    (10 m.eYear, 4 tw-yea) 
 
 
U 
 
 
r 
 
 
     Natve 3-3 
     Native W,1 or 
Cri~pples lests 12-11 
 
 
     Natve 0-1 
Ciples loest 01-1 
 
 
&a?' 
aO 
 
 
11/12 
N 
SI 
SI 
 
 
11/13    6210 
         624T 
 
 
11f1 
N 
 
11/1 
S 
U 
 
S 
 
 
04 
 
 
 
  0 
@06 
 
 
O& 
&A, 
 
064 
  0 
O&, 
 
O&0 
 
 
Deftner 
wybormv 
Schram 
Parker 
Iggloston 
Parker 
 
0. Leopold 
Y.Leopola 
 
 
n.,-li ,-3t *k-11,. 01- 
 
 
2-1 
W-2 
0-1 
0.4 
V-2 
Wl 
 
 
1190.9 1203-.5 
 
 
Sumps= 24 Phs"am W411 
    row . 10-15, 1935 
 
 
1092.2   105 - I 
 
 
11S5. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                 424 University Farm Flac

                                                 June 24, ig~o 
 
 
 
 
Dr.T. R. Triton, Chie 
Illinois Natra History O-ve 
Urbasa, Ilinois 
 
Dear Dr. 7Priee 
 
            Takyou very mob for sedn Irttu   Rakdis up to launch the 
ontirmation of the nesting *tl at lAville rve. 
 
         After re-eaining the oldr reod* I an mose than convinc 
that an  ditiom4 yea's  ata, to be eolloted by Xa(;O, will alvg      w 
r     olease a lare aclatioe of distint vae to both 7Wl orgaization aM 
=Lao. In fa t  I "   aw   with the idea that N.i*t.a Mc~abe sheiU not

only publih a Rwaas notimn   staV, but that H      msore than sw other 
ma I   ow of, is eipped to write a paer or a 0hqtew in the propoed 
wildlife oasal of the Wildlife ociety o nst st    techiques.  Te shelt 
Inlude not only the tehniques   elpe at taville Grov. but the wo fe 
tooniuins which Arthur has dewelope4 since. It shoiul, of cours, Include

the criteria of lsabatios *iah AxtbW started an which UcCabe Is s 
 
         This lw4s ma to the further tout that yor owpsisation an sM 
seea to be haded fb JoiAt projects more or les unoscosly.    Fo 
the fllials uk work plus the DeltS dck w         add up to maek a whle i

m    r  ects, o*e. &y in the more modr   apect   of Uaing aM is the 
cloal enter. of eso an     e. To this an let me s   est that yo visit 
Deta In orde  to glean you own ieaf t hat Is goin o u   there. I w1l 
be at Delta from Ju.n  2 to July #, and Ho*m and I would welcme y 
visit should It be postible for you to drop in.  Nacbam woul also welcome

your visit at an ether time. I ca't recall whetha I have told yA    that
mw 
hope to make Delta a XiM eof "Wo's ole fort the waterfowl mamt fild,

that is, we hope that other institutions with especillv qalified me will

trom time to tLie send those mes to Delta to rouM  out thei  reserhe    wd
to 
exchane ideas. 'Ns are not extending scih invitations to wV aMl all grup

woring ins ateroewl, but I d most heartily extend suh an invitation to la

az  your gp. 
 
         Thian you aain teor your ooperation. 
 
                                       Nineoroly your*, 
 
 
 
                                           Aldo Leopold 
                                   Professor of Willife Mnsmet 
cc Hawias 
 
 
Noehbwa 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
      Report on the suitability for Prairie Chickens and Ruffed . 
      Grouse of Two Areas in the Cook County Forest Preserve 
      District, and Recommendations for the Development of 
      these Areas. 
 Areas inspected--MoGinnes and 95th Street sloughs and va- 
      cinity, Cook County Forest Preserve District. 
 
 Date of inspection--January 30, 1940 
 
 Party--Forest Preserve representatives: Roberts Mann, Lynn 
      Hutchens; Natural History Survey representatives: 
      R. E. Yeatter, C. 0. Mohr, A. S. Hawkins. 
 
 Primary purpose: The Natural History Survey had been requested 
      by the Forest Preserve District administrators to render 
      an opinion as to whether or not the areas inspected are 
      suitable for prairie chickens and ruffed &rouse, or if 
      not suitable at the present time, could they be improved 
      sufficently to satisfy the needs of these two grouse 
      species. 
 
The Opinion: (1) Prairie Chickens. Chances for the success of 
     a planting are only fair under the present conditions 
     found--extensive fall plowing, almost complete crop re- 
     moval, heavy pasturing during the past summer and lack 
     of hay land. However it would be a valuable test to 
     determine whether the range, as it now stands, will hold 
     prairie chickens. We therefore recommend that a small 
     planting--about 7 cocks and 5 hens--be tried immediately. 
     We further recommend that immediate steps be taken and 
     every possible effort be made to improve the present 
     range. Immediate action is advisable because the grouse 
     cycle is now near the peak. Chances of obtaining grouse 
     planting stock and of establishing a new planting are 
     probably best at the peak of a cycle. The cycle will 
     soon be on the downgrade and will not again attain a 
     peak for another 10 years. 
 
     (2) Ruffed Grouse. The range as it now stands appears 
     to be capable of supporting several pairs of partridges. 
     We recommend that every effort be made to obtain (from 
     central Wisconsin or some other point equally near to 
     Chicago) several pairs for release. As in the case of 
     prairie chickens, this release should be made during the 
     present peak of the grouse cycle. The present grouse 
     range can be improved by adding drumming logs, and sup- 
     plementing the extensive haw and crab thickets and black 
     oak woods with other species named under suggested develop- 
     ments. 
 
Recommendations for prairie chicken range manaLement 
     1. If possible, drop the water in McGinnes slough to a 
     point at least 75 yards inside the present limits of the 
     shoreline. Reason: perhaps the weakest point, in the 
     McGinnes prairie chicken range is the small bottomland 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
     acreage and lack of marsh grass covering. Prairie chickens 
     are extremely fond of marshy hay meadows, much more so 
     then of uplands, apparently, but this may be due to the 
     fact that there are no extensive upland or hay areas 
     left. The correlation between remnant prairie chicken 
     flocks in this region, and hay-covered marsh lands is 
     very conspicuous. The uplands which adjoin these hay 
     marshes occupied by chickens at present, receive com- 
     paratively little use, in the cases which we recall. 
 
          We could list a dozen or more other good reasons 
     for reducing the water area of McGinnes slough but two 
     will suffice: (1) Aquatic food production of the slough 
     would increase greatly with lower water levels. (2) An 
     unbelievable increase in value to marsh nesting species, 
     muskrats and ducks would follow the increased emergent 
     ve6etation able to survive following lower water levels. 
     If the water level were permanently dropped, even though 
     there is the chance that most of the water might evaperate 
     during unusually dry summers, leaving the area unattractive 
     to ducks in the fall, the benefits to other species might 
     well over balance the loss to ducks for that one year (or 
     few years). 
 
     2. Upland development would involve the restoration of 
     at least 100 acres of hay and fallow land and the plentiful 
     provision of corn, soybeans and greens. A strip roughly 
     50 yards wide, from the present shore line, should be 
     left fallow. Corn should be planted in the more fertile 
     valleys, alfalfa or other hay in the draws subject to 
     erosion and on the steeper hillsides. One drained pocket 
     which is now plowed should be permitted to revert to its 
     original marshy character. A patch of aspen (for budding) 
     should be planted at one edge of the pdthole. The large 
     pasture west of the slough should be allowed to revert 
     to blue grass and red top. The top of the south-east 
     exposure knoll which at the present time is covered with 
     herbs, Jersey tea and has a few shrubs and oaks, should 
     be planted to hazel (catkins utilized by chickens). 
 
     3. Brush species should be discouraged from invading the 
     main chicken range. Occasional mowing may best serve 
     this purpose. Prairie species should be incouraged in 
     every possible way. 
 
     4. Farmers surrounding the range should be organized into 
     a bufftr zone of protection. 
 
Recommendations for ruffed grouse management. 
Some major requirements of ruffed grouse range follow: 
 
Cover: (1) Breeding 
           (a) Drumming logs should be surrounded by cover too 
           dense for a person to see the drumming bird at 
           50 yards distance. Since each male grouse "hogs" 
           his drumming territory to the exclusion of all rivals, 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
          dru   n  areas should be well scattered over the grouse 
          ranges at least one territory per male. 
                (b) Nests are usually placed in cover ight density 
                such as is found shortly after a forest fire or 
                lumbering operations. Edges of woods, wood lanes 
                and near woodland roadways are favorite places. 
          (2) Brood Cover. It will suffice to say that the haw-hazel 
              dewberry type offered on the proposed Cook County 
              grouse range is almost ideal for this purpose. 
          (3) Winter Cover. This should be dense, such as red cedar 
              thicket or grape tangles might offer. 
     Openings or "edges": Also a requirement of the grouse range.

          An opening does not mean a field when considering grouse 
          range. It means open strips (such as roads or fire lanes), 
          or blocks (an acre or so); also changes in forest type. 
          The most heavily utilized part of a grouse woods is the 
          first 100 yards in from clearings. Solid blocks of woods 
          several hundred yards across contain much waste area, so 
          far as the grouse range is concerned. 
     Food: Grouse should be provided the following kinds of food; 
          berries     bude and catkins, which last through the win- 
          ter; summer berries (blackberries, mulberries) ; succulent 
          vegetation (greens such as white or alaike clover).% The 
          degree to which the above requirements are interspersed 
          determines the carrying capacity for grouse of the range. 
Suggested Developments. 
     1. Supply logs for drumming in a variety of sites. Slopes are 
     good locations. Logs should be placed in thickets, perhaps 
     supplemented by clump plantings of gray dogwood, aspen or red 
     cedar. Use the largest and most weathered logs obtainable. 
     2. If not against the policy of the forest preserve, patch 
     thinning of the canopy to permit the growth of shrub and herba- 
     ceous species at scattered points within the solid oak stand 
     would greatly aid the grouse range. 
     3. The felling of an occasional tree to form brush piles is 
     desirable. These trees should be sawed five or six feet above 
     the ground. The stump will then serve as a center support for 
     the limbs. Trees that have vines growing near them are best for 
     cutting.The vines can then be trained over the brush pile. 
     4. The borders between the marsh land and the oak ridges should 
     be developed into thick tangles of shrubs and vines by plantings. 
     A combination of dogwood, grape, aspen, hazel and wild plum Is 
     suggested. 
 
     5. Fire lanes should be planted to white or alsike clover. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
4 
 
 
6, The following tree species furnish good grouse food and covers 
               Red cedar                 Wild plum 
               Aspen                     Mulberry 
               Poplar                    Juneberry 
               hazel                     Virginia creeper 
               Wild cherry               Bittersweet 
               Apple                     Elderberry 
               Blackberry and raspberry  Viburnums 
               Wild rose                 honeysuckle 
 
Some of these species should be plant4d in clumps, others as indi- 
vidual plants. 
 
General observation. and Recomenations. 
          Red Squir       Since the little red squirrel (not be be 
confused         _ocaTly ceomen fox squirrel) once occurred in Cook 
County, and perhaps still does, Dr. Mohr suggests that a release of 
this species be made. Planting stock can be obtained at a reasonable 
cost within 200 miles of Chicago. Mixed hardwood stands, perhaps 
augmented by red cedsr clumps, are the best ares for release, 
 
          Deer. The area around 95th Street slough could easily sup- 
port a few =w- d deer. We would recoend definitely that a few deer 
be planted were there not the chance for accidents due to deer being 
hit by fast moving cars. This danger is, of course, present in nu- 
merous other places inhabited by deer. Perhaps city officials at 
Rockford, Illinois, near which deer are plentiful* could help answer 
the question, would it be dangerous to plant deer% 
          Prairie Relins. I a draw near 95th Street slough was found 
a prairie relic eoveng several acres, containing the following 
prairie plants: Compass Plant (          t                  Blazing 
Star (14arj sp.), Prairie               ( 
(           d      atu), Indian Grass (                            re 
than   hudred plants of Rattlesnake Maste   (             ifolum). 
Every effort should be made to preserve and!iprve       re 
          T. If it is found that tamarack swamps once 
occurred in       ounty, it is suggested that one be reconstructed, 
following as a plan the procedure used at the Arboretum, Madison, 
Wisconsin. 
          It might be well to study, in detail, other aspects of the 
development plan for the University of Wisconsin Arboretum, Prairie 
restoration Is included in this program. 
 
                             Arthur S. Hawkins 
                             Section of Wildlife Experimental Area 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
                    WIRAHAR R LN                                        
    R   N 
 
 
 
                                          Blackstone Bldg., 
                                          QUINCY, ILLINOIS 
                                          December 2, 1938 
 
 
 
 
 
 
mr. Aldo Leopold, 
 
Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
On a number of our farms we are establishing game refuges for quail and other
gem., 
on a few there is a small amount of hunting done while on other no birds
are killed. 
One of the places on which we have protected the birds for three years and
allowed 
absolutely no hunting has a great many quail and they all seem to be in fine
condition. 
I would like to have your advise on the stock argument of all bird hunters
that it is 
necessary to sho4t a few birds each year in order to keep them from inbreeding.

 
In our opinion this would be necessary only where a perfect control of the
natural 
enemies of the birds was established. It seems to me that nature has provided
for 
the necessary control of this kind and that man need not take it on himself
to help 
in this control except in eases where man has increased the natural enemies
of the 
birds and I can't imagine any case where man has helped to increase our wild
life. 
 
One so Often hears a hunter say that certain hawks should be shot to protect
the quail 
and then turn right around and say that the quail should be killed to keep
them from 
inbreeding. This seems to me to be talking in circles so to speak. I personally
feel 
that the balance of nature should not be destroyed, that what is hear serves
a very 
definite purpose and should be left alone, if it were not for men's many
methods of 
control and slaughter i feel sure we would have plenty of game but the way
things 
seem now i hate to think of what will be left in fifty years. 
 
Owing to a fine breeding season we have a great many quail this year but
it also 
seems to me that there are more hunters than ever before. As i wrote you
last year 
i am not killing any more of these birds audI can no longer justify this
sport. I 
shot one "mess" but was sorry I even did that so have not gone
out again. 
 
We are interested in taking care of our birds and therefore I would appreciate
your 
advise on the above. I have my own opinions about it but of course have not
had the 
experience you have so I nay be all wrong in my views; in any event we want
to do 
what is the best for our quail so that they will continue to increase. 
 
                                            Very truly yours, 
 
 
                                            Z To IR. Cruttenden. 
 
 
WALTER D. FRANKLIN 
 
 
JOHN W. CRUTTENDEN 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                            k424 University
Warm flan 
Division ot Wildlif* IbssM    tn                            D*w'      6,,
1936 
 
 
 
 
 
          Mr, John L. Orated 
          Blackstone Bulding 
 
 
          Dear Mr. Oruittandon 
 
                    I am very glad to hear from you again, part icularly
on the 
          qo~stions *i~a you raiese. 
                    In sW o~pinion there Is not a shred of evidesuos to support

          the contention commn. &3035 sportimon. that shooting is necessary
to 
          the welfar, of quail. There is a good desl of evid4ence to *Vport

          the contention that limlt.4 and moderate shooting 4oe9g not have
W 
          effect on net spring;' population, in other words, does not harm
tit. 
          fti, haowevr, is a d.ifferent proposition. 
 
                    I Woo with you that there is an insgaitty loetweea the

          contention that shooting is beneficial wa prodation by hak eand

          owls is injurious. Ouar evidence all poituts to the conclusion
that 
          the popuation level of quail io determined by food wan cover, and

          that preation ordinamrily hae 30 more effect on ntx year's popalation,

          than limi ted bunting. I mains. oqail an five differeat are"s
and we 
          have no predator control on any of them. 
 
 
 
 
 
                                         AlU 7.eepeU 
                 Vh            ~Professor of Wi1ldlife Y~mgamet 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
Copy to Dr. Frison 
 
 
                                               Marc 23, 19~36 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Supritendent of hiteamin 
Fort Prtew Distrit of Cook Cas 
Oma       -e aur 
River forest, Illinois 
 
zht M.Na 
 
         I do ma knw te Palos Hills but I think I         hav  son  imla

terai and    guess would b* tht the chnc    for *1*ms to goed. 
         I agree tht a de4oo.0* plan shoul preced stcig   Row 
 *m prpaaor    vr  and wht kin wou14 be bot p~s.4 upo byRap 
 Taatwe or Arm  H*awkn of the Illinos Stat. Natuavl History k"Wrq. 
 Boh tha m   hay as gea~t a knwledg    of chickens as exit* as yeti * 
 this conty 
 
        ftoo patche would be d.etrabl bat p~bp       not ...sai.1, lbsmes

th  ch&.1e fMo.m a q log between cove and food and tb. birds might bo

abl, to do their feeding on srmr   din   fam.~ If the *oil in .~exbuse 
you will have to fwrtilise to prfs goed foot patchs. 
 
        If the area to &.park I would oppose withou  qualifisatin the.

In~trofation of    1tk  a 
 
        Chicken migh r*-osiabli*h tlb    les withou   plating bemuse 
sga~tin  chicken* tond to oemp    suitable sil.. encountere during their

winter uwaneins 
 
        The moat t~w~otat thn I ca tell you is to lot Tmatter aMd 
la*ids outlineya  toohaio4 stratea      It is. ialck  accident that Tmu 
haveto 4e *asie eso mm     in     mou ovstate. 
                               Youns ,lmerv, 
 
 
 
                                       Aldo Lepl 
                                 Professr of On Maamiset 
 
  

					
				
				
 
    COMMISSIONERS                                                GIENERAL
HEADQUARTERS 
CLAYTON F. SMITH                                                  CUMMINGS
SQUARE 
   PC"AYT NT                                                       
RIVER FOREST. 
FRANK BOBRYTZKE       FOREST PRESERVE DISTRICT                        ILLINOIS

WILLIAM BUSSE                                                       TELEPHONES

H. WALLACE CALDWELL                                            COLUMBUS 8400-FOREST
4470 
CARL J. CARLSON              OF COOK COUNTY 
MRS. ELIZABETH A. CONKEY 
WILLIAM N. ERICKSON                                               RKAL ESTATE
AND 
FRED FISCHMAN                      ILLJIJNOIS                     LEGAL DEPARTMENTS

MAURICE F. KAVANAGH 
MARY McENERNEY                                                   547 COUNTY
BUILDING 
GEORGE A. MILLER                                                     CHICAGO.

MRS. LUCY PALERMO                     .. se*                         ILLINOIS

DANIEL RYAN                                                          TELEPHONE

JOHN E. TRAEGER                                                    FRANKLIN
3000 
                           CHARLES G. SAUERS. @ONURAL SUUP[RINTENDENT 
                                    March 15, 1930. 
 
 
 
 
 
             Dr. Aldo Leopold 
             University of Wisconsin 
             Madison, Wisconsin 
 
 
             Dear Dr. Leopold: 
 
                               I hope sometime to see you and tell you 
             of the progess of our program of education for park and 
             forest recreation men. The talk I had with you was worth 
             a great deal to me. Started me off on the right track in 
             my thinking. We are really getting a concrete program 
             evolved. 
 
                               By the way, I enjoyed your article in 
             American Forests anent the controversy over the proposed 
             Department of Conservation. One of the few pieces of 
             lucid thinking that I've seen on the subject. 
 
                               For some time Itve had a yen to reestablish

             prairie chicken in the Palos Hills section of our preserves.

             They must have been there many years auo. There are OOO 
             acres there in one big block split east and west by the Sag

             Valley. There are practically no pheasant and few quail. 
             Reason: No farms and no food. Native grasses and weeds 
             long ago destroyed by fires and by cultivation. There are 
             hills and long rolling meadows of 300 or 400 acres in extent,

             surrounded by woods, with numerous marshes large and small.

 
                               Would prairie chicken survive without a 
             feed crop, in your opinion. There is absolutely no hunting.

             Some time ago, in the Saturday Evening Post, I saw mention 
             of a dwarf milo maize that was developed for planting in the

             Dust Bowl. Why would'nt that make an ideal feed crop? Do 
             you know anything about it? 
 
                               The Dept. of Conservation wants to go off

             half-cocked and plant chicken right away. I am holding back.

             I am writing Dr. Ralph Yaetter also. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
Dr.Aldo Leopold 
 
 
                The Dept. of Conservation also wants to plant 
Ghukar partridge in the same area. Because I know absolutely 
nothing about this bird I said no. Here are my reasons, which 
may be wrong: 
 
     As far as I know it is not a native bird. 
     For all I know the two species could not both survive in 
the same area. 
     Why should we plant 6hukar when this is not and does not 
serve a hunting area? 
     Why plant 4hukar just to be planting something when we 
are primarily interested in maintaining or restoring native 
fauna? 
                I know you are busy but we would appreciate 
your advice on these questions. It is so hard for amateurs, 
sincere though we may be, to find the right answers to this 
stocking problem. 
 
                        Yours very truly, 
 
 
 
 
                        Ro bert s Mann, 
                        Superintendent of Maintenance. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
1532 University Avexua 
Jsnza  14# 1930 
 
 
Dear 3.* 
 
Is pm tr 
to you epmam   . 
two youn follow 
V447 wellI 
 
 
ur crw  h&* ever vdr  aken W  r 
s   -  of aw sowuld be qu)4fted 
whomI think would fit you   apeIfteat1oAs 
 
 
       Departmen-,  Wsmadlef Wieui 
     01tibt "teetin4 U. 5. X4eeglal eavr 
 
   I to nt kww their preset salarie, 10A I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Vk                Pro~lwfesnr of Om aagmn 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
THE WORLD'S GREATEST NEWSPAPER 
 
 
January 3, 1938 
 
 
                                               TRIBUNE TOWER * CHIC. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Doctor Aldo Leopold 
Universitt of Wisconsin 
Madison, Wisconsin 
 
 
Dear Aldo: 
 
          Apparently Colonel MoCormiok wishes to go into 
the breeding of game birds extensively this spring. It 
seems that I have the difficult Job of finding for him a 
youbg man who can handle this Job# I wonder if you could 
make sme suggestions about fellows who know how to raise 
a variety of game birds on the Colonel's farm at Wheaton, 
Illinois. If you have any suggestions I will appreciate 
them very much. Also can you give me any idea on what these 
young men will want in the way of salary. I understand the 
Colonel is also going to put the Job of raising turkeys on 
anyone who is hired. 
 
          Many thanks for your help. 
 
          Best regards. 
 
 
Sincerely yours, 
 
 
 
Bob Beoker 
Outdoor Editor 
 
 
BB/1r 
 
 
AGO 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
                                           1532 Ur1vm1si  hw..u 
                                           Decmber 6. 1937 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
16 estA Jeacko  olvr 
 
Dea Ihs% ar 0a)dw 
 
 
         I imagine you bv. 'been wondrin vh     aert 
.an Woolf have dropped out of night durin receat moths. 
 
         The story to this; Namewstro foun Whe hesine 
up here last fall thMt h. had to tak   a lot uos?. wurvos tsA 
either of us haM anticiated.    M..rdigly he Is spening thi 
entire first semeter getting rid of his couse     and Is don 
ao fieldwr ~*xmst suo  basuidi wor as we san got adon 
thog voluntseerooerators sctee ove the state. The 
upshot ts that he will not b~a serious field work until 
 
         We are still Interested In work em the Leach Oro 
Marsh but natwrelly cant 'be defin~ite a~bout it uAtiil Raesrstrou 
has had a *hace to look over the area, whick will1 met be until 
7ebraiay. 
 
         With best regrds 
 
                           Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
       Profeessr of bin. No~mot 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
                                           1332Wyesity -vm 
 
 
 
          :ai 19 193 
 
 
 
14 Vogt 166MMBlvx 
040P   1111061t 
z~r16Z 
        On tba last GOlI Of ***&i0A *hR wO %AV* am ON b    e 
thr has Uoa WM  a r1g Of *%My sba*10o tht I hav had, ASCMAS 
to post yo  to "te, as the putter of posoftl* rovaanh v* an t 
-wgw  rein 
        Raoto to Attjaitoly itending~ tosotar vauto Wof ta 
th VAvosiwty g to tak mwe ths prii shtak st   In. AMst Or 
sRptemw. be will do this vep.,   sof ,t *W  SA f ttA"   h$1 
fr om the Baao  groVi f who  b~o t olass he it o e~ting 0- is 
a&VRO  tbg wo* will howav &btter lootimaty it vwhhepehl be 
availabsl*. 
        I think Rwowmort   to wilting or h  writton yft ao Lat 
   Am h igt eall any to got acutRA 
        Re to 4a0 favrly Eip~o~ to the use of the L*A Croo 
  mrhas ano of the -td are" on *iah his way will tbe .swatootatid. 
Re Agoo with so tht an Isolated Podautlef unit  soa bo ta*a ra 
marsh effor a obneto trw liot an a good mW pr~m        h    wmlL 
'oo harder to tm at s a bIgwa ra~p 
        Only I~miwtol attantion evulA Ue gta to door pso~amts# 
  *t,,W I ~-:sohav ntb~ swadet ealli  an -e today wh is Intterets& 
In a4Sdoorot, wAImW be able s5Ut1Zvto fIgeout easeu       to 
-e at the stm at th Baaoodw har. Ths hard praomtbte 
a~s..ag  as t  Ih t pare h:as~ an Lec Cromrh 
        As.opoe with a Yerm a& whenyou first &kdtA mabu 
1oseam  ~,w     o hav the advatsg of a peretly floatbis p" 
po4 al  r Whih wic or little work eml be u~vtelq to aota". 
   I wul lketo tak the *4.l thing ove with you wA would ope*Iato 
yva sageting a "to 1a I migt eall = y     or vho ymv1 be 
able to ew vs*xAlo at wr p~tattonse. 
                            Tow   tG"7 
 
 
 
                                  A1~ Loeyoli 
       *                      0ooeor ofams UMmx~vt 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                      AM 30 # 193T 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr Va. I.V 
 
 
Dea M,~, 1,1*.t 
 
         I -n ineoo   In you XC Roo Cree  wjet.J 
&M vmd   of core bs glad to talk It ove with you, 
Dab   the    .we I shall be in an oubt if yo    " 
&M  me a lie a fe " -a in amo, there vo~uld be a 
 
        You als have In yw *tato a reuar   mri*o 
for advising lanMaerv with probles of you kind. Th 
State Natural Ristor7 Suv~  at Urban& has taken an 
   Dr.R.1. Teatt one of w fome   t      You it 
gt his help in dawing    initial pleas and lVot* 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     ? ref~sor of So                 aown 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
                              "WTELSH AND GUoREEN 
                                        INCORO RATEO 
                                  135 SOUTH LASALLE STREET 
WM.W. WELSH                                                             
      TELEPHONE 
RUSSELL W. GREEN                        CHICAGO                         
      FRANKLIN 3151 
WM. PRESCOTT HUNTJR. 
DEWITT DAVIS 
H. W. VENEKLASEN 
 
 
                                         June 24, 1937 
 
 
          Professor Aldo Leopold 
          University of Wisconsin 
          Madison, Wisconsin 
 
          My dear Professor Leopold: 
 
          rhile in Ann Arbor last week at my 25th reunion I had a most pleasant

          talk with Professor Jocelyn Van Tynef of the Zoology Department,
on the 
          Subject of birds. I advised hin that with a group of friends I
ac- 
          quired 45 acres of nicely wooded bottom land on Big Rock Creek,
one 
          mile south of Plano which is sixteen miles southwest of Aurora.

 
          We are planning to make a game and bird refuge and are applying
to the 
          State Conservation Department for their protection which we understand

          we can get by leasing our property to the State Conservation Department.

 
          The woods is mixed with hard maple, elm, oak, butternut, red cedar,
syca- 
          more, and basswood with plenty of undergrowth and wild grapevines.
Some 
          of the trees must be close to eighty or a hundred years old. There
are 
          fox, coon, mink, opossum reported to be on the land and there are
plenty 
          of song birds. We are planning to do some planting to make it more
at- 
          tractive for the birds and are raising some wild turkeys, mallards,

          pheasants, and quail to release on the land. 
 
          We are distinctly amateurs and so we are seeking any advice and
assistance 
          we can get in what we believe is an enjoyable and well worthwhile
project. 
          In telling Professor Van 1Te± about our plans he recommended
that by all 
          means we get in touch with you, because of the very fine work that
you 
          and your men have been doing on these lines. I would certainly
appreci- 
          ate being told how we can acquire some of your books and literature
cov- 
          ering your work, and would greatly appreciate any suggestions or
words 
          of encouragement that you might give us. 
 
          If it isn't asking too much, I would appreciate your advising me
when I 
          might have an opportunity of meeting you. I come to Milwaukee quite
often 
          on business and could arrange to drive up to Madison--or, if you
are going 
          to be in this vicinity at any time, I would certainly make every
effort to 
          call on you if it was at all convenient. 
 
          I trust that I am not imposing on you and if so, it will be the
fault of 
          Dr. Van Tyne who urged me to write you and tell you what we were
doing. 
 
                                                 Very truly yours, 
 
 
 
                       WWW:Ii 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Copy to Eamerstrom 
 
 
                                       1%32 ftiert AV,* 
                                       April 150 l937 
 
 
 
 
 
  Mr 84 1, Pattw 
 
 
 
 
          so*  w   thng to talk abt tha V=vtNo M* - Z 
41"  to yft gr rakttom to you MW~h md US -U  for th  ~ 
 
        I thi* the mars wen1 mk a~ TMl7 -&u~I  Atuy m 
wit~h Ym cmmat, led 111 to bints a PWA Of tb wQ* tho  U 
of the wo of owrsq will be in tbo omtlos to th nort. 
        I bw select" . N. Ju~rot r.# am of 1oa 
Ro h" b.m sab  up to do fo*0v -rmbt w* b e" fo     two m. 
He wao tratma IW zI gm at JIm Rato Oal1"o, *in he W 
Uis mowrs dge. I an endin   m tw of his Jta~t V~lI*&tI.W- 
He will begiu ** wmnttm &wi th w0 
        Th fistthn a. to wor  -a Barbo to to mks sur th 
  yo b    t14   isidno In Rototo thi 4a I m o*1b  hia to 
call 00 Yo- ....t"1. 11. is t=4 w44l 1*0 to Ot YmAM mw. 
 
        Hamm trat   I doir to mo* with rarvdosof ~wbtw 
mW ftinamtl coeainlater awtWIaLm. Riwes bawvr he will 
be wo r saivtlyo his  aw.3     am wiat bv to w tattua 
&M oprte a -.r It to ala tha x baip we ma ge, from the 
Barbo grou or olew    will sA to the ssntwil waM strmm 
of thew*i. 
 
to The Daawt q~ts - apart frmw flu 4 help frm h.Asr 
d*gly I - still at yormlt or Mr. ftas' ad. for a date ait 
Baabo   I imlos. on -xr *&p~ of this lottwo obmI yo  m to 
soad it to Mr. S*tgps, 
        It go" wittbet WIM.vg of *our"  "t it *mwbu. eM 
 Iwe dwoix iu YO rWI1 We will be "Utilblo th MOIU 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
200L to M*tw                            eQ1s r 
 
 
tbat " a sietM4#sto tba, prairto hc  stu4 ws 0 Ut 
use lear a -e deal about the Dwbow herd4. Alosot 
 
 
          Perawdyl 1*a fmwr with a Vwdaw of e~atbas 
to brobWInt ta w now. MIA of Imiy so I ~pvoiit w will 
 
 
 
 
 
                          yva Sie g. lmin 
 
 
AprU 151 193T 
 
 
PS. Thanks for smAtag or grip. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    kam 2ma     Draine bir Binde Dro, betwee 1916 and 1923. No gt 
doaevs in tamaac are reamo by loca uan. "Th Popla ut.atW f 
a tire *ern in abou~t 1923. UMaa po~e thiclust omu4o to In tbo fom 
of a arrow strip     s11t  a  ditch, an rusmt, m dxbt, an e 
sosI hi1h an extra deep pet buwR tol place   This to oantirne ty the 
hat that the spoil ban oppsite sua thiekts is in eah saw entirely 
 
 
    eh ot tae     t in nmtt1ts, expectally on the east um(. Csi (RiNit) 
 
seM te follow rt    afer nottlet.s is              t the 116t4 
burned spots nea the noth t*rv      Bo btrh is narly ma vat by fire. 
fwb of the nth sid Is go  &M   *  to     t oo to paq willo if g 
a Short "Spite frM fire. 
    Re b  is vt, Th frergut s   in fie a     to be sot for 00e p 
at Sahob   &Wk Wm, D~    nest alon the old naturld1  ne of lat  Crek

    Bmmw& Potterto consideriwg ca gr~s stripe for ttwrebrok. 
    Wade Adamel and lasal fames agroe an     t &'*   22 dew and 20  p

aas rsentin         the wir, pmlatmon In 1936-3T. Pamt 
 
  isAsI                      .e                  s  t 
    A iccal  ae (Seb) r    w ta, mink, &W , ma# but n o ae. 
 
M~jg    Mlgal         A X. Ba~sstt of MdMg Orhr  as orw 
allmaaut just prwios to 19M. An ope  seao wa allmmd whichpores" 
shaitmaM a" mw derased &W hutie Iinersa       (30, 20. 10, an  dF)

M~ 1902 the door veevrta      wiped outt* ThW built up *agi  -uin the we*

and &bout 1919 eshebd a pek  tlt(d as1 time. the prsent Ve~ation. 
TWW "tmie ftAiy ahendant vati 1927, bat bw. aim    bUm  earessigrat

4mu pre=Pb  to ~abM 
 
 
ApAl 161M 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Rar Potter bas i* eletric few to Wtect appl treo bu hmett 
 
 
 
 
 
    ,RM~~ ~~ F=ZM2MgU o.* 1936-57 (Walte UII*  an& AjW) . 
(Fo len ~iios see Sw  Go, =xr f tol book.) 
       Leac Cr*           22 d~w 
       DellCran           10 
            Pine 36L~v0       (but xit wintertbr if Ifd) 
 
 
 
 
       34jw bilt*R? 
 
 
 
 
 
    Th GaodoMa. Moe (Colvabi) hsA 301, and the Mamini Wtto  a 
 
 
 
 
    seea bmaro dooai the omtq 
 
 11   A11 Observe s agre an a setn ady e do*5 ofI q~lth*q  1933 1936# 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
O#~t . c.j8t 
 
 
 
        R. Ptter 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                       )1"  15# 1937 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Mr.5nad 1. Patto 
164 west jako amiwnv 
 
 
 
        I am d*IWt4 to bA~ frm yo.Prfso      mit 
 had told me a     boths trip on you  mms  an  Iama= 
 ft period April IT-47. bow"W   I wIll be Plantiqe ono 
 
 
        The" mot b-p been am.e six-p about thespokn 
"4to with Mfr. Steep, sinc I boew me boar fro hM. 
bvmmo, that doe nt attor and we*& talk It ove at the 
tim. of our -ox visit. ~Moaw I homCnoao     lot of 
-w Ude  bearngo tbe gonrI sbject. of"s*vhI the 
PabZob reion Aubh %woul l4ik to Iq before Yo. 
        Dan't tage that I anaso anims to hae yo 
0e ow Plam."no tu spring. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                         Prfessor of OsMngon 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IN COP PORATED 
 
 
   1IN S JACKASNTC E 
16}4 W E ST JACI S ON BOULEVRklD 
 
 
CHIAoGo 
 
 
            SAN FRANCISCO 
            LOS ANGELES 
              PORTLAND 
              SEATTLE 
              VANCOUVER 
              PHOENIX 
              TULSA 
              WINNIPEG 
              DULUTH 
March 11, 193/NEAPOLIS 
IN REPLYING PLEASE 
"REFER TO H.I.P* 
 
 
Prof. Aldo Leopold, 
Conservationist - U. S. Department of Wild Life, 
University of Wisconsin, 
Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
Dear Prof: Leopold: 
 
You will be interested to know that I have acquired title to 520 of 
the 760 acres of reclaimed marsh land just North of the Notch West of 
Route 33, which is a paradise for game. 
 
Last weekend Dean Christensen, of the Agricultural College, and 
Prof. Aamodt were up there and we saw three deer feeding on the marsh 
and as we circled the Tamaracks five deer came out and leisurely io 
across the marsh and were within view for a mile or more. 
 
There are some 200 prairie chickens in one flock, according to Mr. Bailey,

a farmer in that neighborhood, who made the couit recently. 
 
Steeps said he wrote you about coming to Baraboo but gave you such short

notice that he was not surprised when you had other appointments. 
 
Whenever it is convenient in the near future I would like to arrange 
with you to look over this new acquisition because it is my intention to

make it a Wild Life Refuge but before doing so would like to discuss it 
quite carefully with you. 
 
 
                                        Since7!y yours, 
 
 
 
 
HIP:D                                     oa°rdaI. Potter./ 
 
 
OUR SERVICE INCLUDES A LIFE INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 
 
 
NEW YORK 
  BOSTON 
  MONTREAL 
  BUFFALO 
  PITTSBURGH 
  CLEVELAND 
  COLUMBUS 
  DETROIT 
INDIANAPOLIS 
  LONDON 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Cowv to Mfr. Potter 
 
 
         Mr.~~ R.Z.Stop 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Barabo, Rioosi 
 
 
 
at Biame, I shudU temte t oou attmAtics, 
  ____    Is jut to -an yo that if yw 
    grV hul osr o o reet h mtero wild- 
life retrb I vaa4 U  9 gU *td.s at yorftI 
               you ste"7 
 
 
 
                      A3Ao LopI 
     *rfer Ofs Oto MRSOX 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr. H~rd1. 1$ttw 
 
 
 
  mdato Ilini 
 
 
 
        I fully =d~t  tha it woul not be stvatqt 
 
shnid mt writ* =s boo D     8bw 20 $1 wildo bis.& lin. 
 
        MamlI I b~    ~ng~tv  ou vetu  a go" deal 
 oftbmwt avA thikI* 2ec uaage sa      of th  raia~ 
 diffloutie., I will no tr  o disas these tml u 
wtll be ttwe~stod to talk tb  hngee with yo &t the mot 
 
        With best regus 
 
 
 
 
                               A14o Ie.W14 
       StgmdIn            Pfas~so of 0e Mnagwt 
Mr. Looolds 4bseWO 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
                   MARSH &M I N~AN 
 NEW YORK                           INCORPORATEO                       SAN
FRANCISCO 
 BOSTON                                                                 LOS
ANGELES 
 MONTREAL                     I      UI   TN C E                        PORTLAND

 BUFFALO                      r1UnAj                                    
SEATTLE 
 PITTSBURGH                                                             VANCOUVER

 CLEVELAND                                                              
PHOENIX 
 COLUMBUS               FEDERAL RESERVE BANK BUILDING                   
 TULSA 
 DETROIT                                                                
WINNIPEG 
INDIANAPOLIS              164 WEST JACKSOON BOUILEVARD                  
 DULUTH 
  LONDON                                                                MINNEAPOLIS

  MILWAUKEE                                                             
ST. LOUIS 
                                  cmcmicp                  December 4, 1956.

                                                           IN REPLYING PLEASE

                                                           REFER... HeI*P.

 
 
 
 
   Prof. Aldo Leopold, 
   Department cf Agricultural Economics, 
   University of Wisconsin, 
   Madison, Wiscomsin. 
 
   Dear Professor Leopold: 
 
   Vice-President H. J. Steeps of the Bank cf Baraboo, whom I mentioned to

   you some weeks ago as being enthusiastic about getting together interest-

   ed parties for the preliminary work on the game survey in Sauk County,

   told me last Saturday that it was still uppermost in his mi'd but that

   President L. S. VauOrden of the Bank had been confined to his home most

   of the time during the past few weeks which left the burden of the Bank

   with Mr. Steeps. Accordingly Mr. Steeps has not had an opportunity to

   date to give the attention necessary to our proposal.-, Further, he men-

   tioned that a good many of "those who do things" along this
line in Bar- 
   aboo have been engaged in a campaign ce the local Elks Club, in the pur-

   chase of the former Al Ringling home for Club quarters. However, he 
   thought these activities would be over soon and he hoped to get a chance

   to do something along our lines. 
 
   I mentioned to Mr. Steeps that in view of the fact that I was located
in 
   Chicago most of the time perhaps it would be best for him to communicate

   with you. My suggestion now is that if you do not hear from him within

   a week that you drop him a line saying that you are doing so at my request.

   State that you would like to arrange a date convenient to you and to him

   for the preliminary gathering. 
 
   Steeps is a fine fellow, brother-in-law of Judge Evans, whom you know,
and 
   I know you will like him. 
 
   My experience has been that unless one follows these things rather active-

   ly they "die on the vine". 
 
   If you agree with the above procedure let me have a line from you so that

   I will be advised in order to help you in any way that I can. 
 
                                               Sin   ely yours, 
 
 
   HIP:D                        ~yus 
                                              4  w a r I.. P ott e r. 
 
 
OUR SERVICE INCLUDES A LIFE INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
    53122MW        MUTUJAL zrFm NSURANJO3 O1A~r 
 
 
                                     Xi1xe..    is., July 6, 1936 
 
 
 
?wmf. Aldo Loopoll 
Colg   of griatare 
 
 
Dar, Pr fesso                   oeopodO 
           I  ewaccran with oiu onversatin m  time 
ago, the follwin   s a desrption of the manne  in wh 
the f-oex w    killed b  o ebus- 
           "Som yea   ago *i1#i lvRtig with anther 
  youg anin Calhoun Cony  Illinois, welW po   on a 
fez smpqto by his tall. from the fork of &projecting 
liv* of a falle tree. This limb projected some fiteen~ 
toet into the air. 
 
              Ther  was &  bad fstation of so~deburs in 
that partiular' part of the county, and the river bottom 
soi is a black     . In ranin thr      the wees an 
wvt scil, the foxis brah had beo  mette4 with the cockle- 
burrs and   b  soil unti It closely resemb  a rather 
large ball. 
 
           He hMA evidetly run up the protruing limb 
to throw the p      dog off t   smut, an In jux 
off gan. the matted ball at th end of his tail      t 
in the narow fo   of the branches, levin the fox 
hwaing inm id-i,~e Vhable to release himself, he ha& 
perishe *whert " frM him. sometimo ferwad 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Coie for Pox foler~s 
           Ilinocis folere 
 
 
Original filed Acidont folderW 
 
 
9M 
 
  

					
				
				
 
                                                                      BOARD
OF NATURAL RESOURCES 
                                                                        
 AND CONSERVATION 
     DEPARTMENT OF                                                    BIOLOGY
 WILLIAM TRELEASE 
                                                                      FORESTRY
- HENRY C. COWLES 
REGISTRATION AND EDUCATION                                            GEOLOGY
- EDSON S. BASTIN 
                                                                      ENGINEERING
- JOHN W. ALVORD 
  JOHN J. HALLIHAN. DIRECTOR                                          CHEMISTRY
- WILLIAM A. NOYES 
       SPRINGFIELD                                                    THE
DIRECTOR -JOHN J. HALLIHAN 
                                                                      UNIVERSITY
OF ILLINOIS  - 
                                                                      PRESIDENT
ARTHUR C. WILLARD 
 
                                      STATE OF ILLINOIS 
 
 
               HENRY HORNER, GOVERNOR 
STATE NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY DIVISION 
              THEODORE H. FRISON. CHIEF 
                     URBANA 
 
 
 
                            April 4, 1936 
 
 
Professor Aldo Le.Ild, 
In Charge, Game Research, 
New Soils Building, 
M adison, Wis cons in. 
 
 
Dear Al do: 
 
         Thank you for the literaturc you sent me recently. 
We have found only -bout normal losses of prairie chickens 
thiF -,inter on our area in Jasper county, southeaste~rn 
Illinois, but something li1re 80 per cent loss of quails 
on the same area since last September, including a moderate 
kill during the hunting senson. 
 
                                Sincerely yours, 
 
 
 
                                  E. e. 
 
 
Game Specialist 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
H.L. STEVENS & C2 IPAE Y 
 
      201 CUOArtA 7/2elr8 C5 Ireel 
 
           CHIAIGO 
 
         March 30th, 1936. 
 
 
 
 Professor Aldo Leopold, 
 Soils Building, 
 University of Wisconsin, 
 Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
 Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
 I see that you have returned from 
 your trip to Germany, and I hope 
 you had a profitable and enjoy- 
 able trip. 
 
 I am sorry to say that the build- 
 ing business has not recovered 
 sufficiently as yet to Justify 
 my providing for a graduate 
 student in game at Valley Farm, 
 near Tomah, Wisconsin, but my 
 desire to do this is just as 
 strong as ever, and you may be 
 sure that just as soon as busi- 
 ness conditions justify, I will 
 make such an arrangement. 
 
               Sincerely yours, 
 
 
 HLS: dlhh 
 
  

					
				
				
 
                           ci- ,Ct,-zLc  1Li A-J---%7 / 
 
 
                  K          6J-z- c2-               '/7, 
 
1       /2                     /2 
 
 
xi-c,- 21C--          - 2   X      ' < 
                   /1                         / 
 
 
/1/c 9, 
 
 
 
 
 
           -      -   . 
 
 
If 
 
 
11)                                       e-/  7 
 
 
o,/-", 
 
 
7' 
 
  

					
				
				
 
/ 
 
  

					
				
				
 
           STATE OF ILLINOIS      /7  
DPEARrAENT OF CONSERVA~TION 
HUNTING CLUB DAILY REGISTER 
    Mtigratory Bird Kill - Illinois Game Code Seotion 27-A 
 
 
Name of Club 
 
 
Nw _Crya4 lake 93.k 
 
 
LoOation Henerson Go, 
               License Ro. 
 
 
Make Dily nti 
   each night 
 
 
Hunter 
 
 
         4>4 
 
Hul      0 4:jd 
 
 
Adress 
 
 
444 
 
 
2a 
 
 
Secretary. 
  0          0 5 
  0          0 4 
  c!) 
  !L   J 4>4is010 
,3 hA 10  liPt 
 
 
s 3  414 
 
 
If 
 
 
A 
 
 
:,  - 
 
 
&e4 
iJ  
 
 
6 
 
 
] in ... .. 
 
 
7 
 
 
f 
 
 
/I 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
                  UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
                         BUREAU OF BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 
                                   WASHINGTON, 0. C. 
 
     ADDRESS REPLY TO 
CHIEF, BUREAU OF BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 
       AND REFER TO 
         FH-Z                                             May 28, 1931 
         Quail 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
       404 University Ave. National Bank Bldg., 
              Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
       Wallace B. Grange has asked us to send you a copy 
 
of his report on a proposed quail management demonstration 
 
at Seneca, Illinois, which we take pleasure in inclosing. 
 
                           Sincerely, 
 
 
 
                                InlC BW9 .AAtgh .4-" 
 
cIne. B-9657.                      Acting Chief. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Caa1, fl21wis, mS ad an Ay 12v 1931 Inacaw    wit vI* . Tahn bU.l 
fiel. ermettv ofsfl .the ft -,Ou do        eaaa C i sz W. 3-. A*f .t 
    Pma~et f s enea TuMt Club* A eonoee had bee hold W*Pe 
 
 
 
 
 
        sorsofwhah3Wser* resemalyowndf n the I balan * es~y  forB 
 
        ofa.9atu  Te re i tpialo al Ilini ~terrtor inbo 
inetineycutivate   n bar o oof  rort Us~ -os ý*.% fhani th 
A portion of th aea ib h140  iatostvel fao pltem land abov * 
    brek* ec~ersetio eontalz th bbi"aMf -gulles, ofmWtal 
us.4g4, ovwoon Us riuve; tho *1vr owtion coasit. of lxva 
 
 
 
 
 
bogs to larg . 0m pet or 160 soe wa en    "ad aattle groe 
   offth sw~;ý cms Iu wintw.e Onso Urwp hodm  are s~til foun but 
am bo136 grbe out aa4tho whid w*~ leftor ommIxl trm4 up 
   eve" 1ýWyors . -r~In of rudidon faoom      an4 *va gpUlo 
   strw aurw hs bewt caredwte o as axmp emet alon the trsk 
It 15 add4 Vt th vftls clemis  up Vaes ws     S~ acwi~d uU 
-o whn suc sloan as "Kil ymk cio an4 re" a hog *we tbe ia~e of,

$14 ft, The e~I 08 ing Up  ees. ha  "m# eamto moiscp# 
pratioee -Ti belw this are, and -khpo Is It, th prettee of nrn 
teines by mtal osvest of lwidaw to am* effectivel olnnt all. 
    formerowI veeato  o md, rosultii4 In cul~tivnt.3 of *vey fot or 
laM.o Cor and onto a"loading mtop with -m whots 
 
      A  y uatayorble eolit>ioa In the )ineat eyvt  I in.ue  hlet 
Un is fe-ils and wodativ it was wrbom.4 in sad following the wa 
to such an extet that -As of Uit  eWnoe an faeaoeur~s m4 to 
no owwsd bybas    s bawmtseow s. Roa~e are pimrllZ on a al 
th SfIn cro bais with eash Ro for jvd lAM, but diffteuS1y is 
said to be expeinre4 In cleo1tin  l retals sand wax of the tenants 
  ram fa ne ortw yaws sand a  o. Cnouen$17 there beAs bee lit-tl* 
= so opotty for au   omant ý*lioy of land iuse belun woke ott tar

those fomp esoepcia in vis of V4oow t~smv Satt1u    of taing 
vhtevw Sib land will erlc vIll. t-s t.)dug Im rod 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
           agmMangemnt racics o th Ara: DOquail have booesreleasee   OIL

       theare. 50 Mxicn bbwhtes i ho, 1950 and 300 natve quail., 
   probab   - frm  ssissippi, In arc~h 1931. 
 
       25 feeing patches have beon jpsanto  about the .proety. In 1910 
 vey little gran matued as rainfall. from April. until. fall a negligibl~e.

 Va. 131 the patchesn have been planted to Korean 1stpedzat soyeans# 
 millet, kaffir eorn, and sorgu but apaetythee        seedwere all mixed

 up and. pleanted togethr. Th ace   r   etaizdi       h   neiro 
 the propety. 
       61 grain feeding hopeprs or boes wer In use last winter, the box 
being set up off the ground so that the quail =at jump up into it to eat.

The box is eovw.4 ove with wire t~o afford protetionand~ the hopper is 
of tea partly *o e by cornstalks and brush. 
       Whlos i~ae sees to be a vey definite feeling against hawk amd 
owls, as welan fur-bearing aanials, there has not been, apparently, any 
orfpAised effot to destro then6  I believ* howver, that farers are 
encouraged to kill possible predators, 
       Artificial propagtion of quail is being    netkno a       sal 
seals in pen which a" a wide depature from the ordinay equipmnt. Pn

are only a foot or 16 inches high are inua) and have wire bottm    raised

fro the groun for brooding birds. A. fish not top is designed to aset as

    bufrin cae the birds are exited. A few egg are beingprdc. 
An attozit to rear young quail unde hens will be mae, bringing th~e birds

up to an ag when they can be tune dow  with cook quail. 
         ThefaT~roon whose propeties feed patches have beon located are 
paid for the lend thus used. P~ayets average about 020 per station and 
.totalled about $800 last year. 
 
   0ELi!Rt  3 Th   Senec Hn~mt Clu&b has a  oumbewship of 23. Most of
these 
men hve doslittle or no hunting on the rpry 
 
Preseat Q  il Status: In 1929-19D it wa estimated there wer IW0O quail 
inth   un   lu  poery     In 1930-1931 the estimat, is that therwe wre 
not moe than 400, or half the mubrof releasd birds only. quail 
declined seriously in the last year. Whether or nt the decline is 
peramnent cannot be aserwtainesd at this time* 
 
Stt-11     fo   eostain       As fras the land, agricultural practies, 
     and reset reul  . ae oeorned, a quail iaagmnt'duaostation emit 
reasonably be eqpeeted to produce results, baringexrodny           iom 
stances beyond control.. The lad in ntrlypoutive. It in typical. 
of the fsaring lands of a largepar of Illinois and from this sadon 
a demnsmtration woud be vey deirable. So far an the area itself is 
cocene, thea, a demonstration would be possible and desirable, and in 
fact the lands embraced in the preserve would, in my opinion, be e~melleat

for the purpse. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
        iUmvjjte lb -aual *otrl w4 eabt 4Waum      the 
 balice of th prseve bolga mbjet to little or sw 9e.o so A        ea 
 ammaw' of aer is onemod,        Abwmnm 4wmrh~ip b1nft- mko iaouro, 
 Patlaul3w1 If adoat &" aMe with ovwr Init seth.. woking, reltion,

 ship  et be a ebllaehe4 wit teawts, :n the ap1ini9u of 14. -mith, 
    ,eiet 4t Ue ekb, it *m14 be tooexanv 1to.um&        coer rstw*- 
 tion rightso m  st of tho hiab-pri.4 ftm laM of tki. &re. It would 
 &18, 14 at Samm     In Us OP   O b00 vtri*115ý 1APOaa1. to u'W
into 
 efet4ive a~otent an to Vie Preservtion kSt est~ata  eove  becaus of 
 thin cota iuvolv. The *eleto of on: a"U    are* ror iataiy deelp 
 Lien woldnt be Nasibl1, inhs opnofrtqmao     htfemi 
 this area would  .qlgiv  mar eaeo   tio    thee. vi toe   the ma 
          aret ad hiswm~ ogstder4i~wtsfatiu n1,   tht  We ra1 s ~t 
   bei" n contra of coerts acm   be miaurad for the V-r., yerra 
and "t if mwh cow rosumtion mw       a amjo ý4thok 1nYv~.d4,
lia 41 
no$ W1Iaev th r~m feibe rr  them stap t St emelt, It vt 
ox~aIaia4 that th ernst mi1it no be grat t~w naural reemtation 
msth~s, but Sh point at issei in nt Vain 4oko at retortion buit th# 
coat at si. Um us* islfa . 
 
             'ade Uw t aboe. airemtne it does not ae     poosb). 
   tj ude *k  a qail uwaawt   4emitrtio.    I we.).d nt roao     a 
 
(samy1 to &, of the area) mA be askwd   If suh aa~      can be oferd

for vie arn sa yaee or~ w  a. p@4 size tt 'within int ars, I 
woul re  m4 faoaby 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                 7ý.3 Iran 
 
  

					
				
				
FPer  190175 M  " 
 
 
E. 1. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & COMPANY             o- to: 
           WFACORPORATEDX                        A do ~~Leopoldo 
       WILMINGTON, DELAWARE                   404 WLY.oAY5.BRUloi  Bldg.

SMOKIELSFS POWDW DEPARTMENT 
 
 
 
 
                                             X& at 1931. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                 Tour disusions with M. Farnswrth relative to 
       a quail donstratio   in Ilinois strikes me as being tesirable 
       an  prmisin.    No doubt al will notify us of his ooversation 
       with Mr. Farnsworth at a later date. 
 
                 I note that you are sendin a copy of your letter to 
       Ball and to Leopold, and I an ig the se with this o that 
       they wili be informe of what it going on. 
 
                 Of mwss it would be Impossible for ws to mske say 
       guess as t whether 0? not G      wuld be availble for this 
       work.* Hewer, I quite         ei eldts suggestion that it 
       might be advisable to have rringtea on this ob     to have 
       Gmgs look in on it as an   when his duties take him within 
       striking distance of this location - this priarily with the 
       idea of aquainting Gran  with the flinois situatios and 
       the developments, so that the reprt of this demonstration 
       could We coordinated with the other reports, and in that way 
       the dozonstratioi an far as results e c          w  d be 
       tied in with the southern quail area demonstrations.   I 
       not sure whether this oould be tied in In say other wayuvhever, 
       athowh I    quite oofident that Ball, Farnmrth, Leopol   and 
       Zrrington could work out satisfactory methods of wocedure an 
       I sugest to thou that they take this matter uy with that end 
       In view. 
 
 
                                L. W. T. WALLER 31 
                                DIRZOTOR O? OCONSERAT ION* 
       LWf /o 
 
  

					
				
				
Form 19017* 5M   MW 
 
 
E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & COMPANY 
           INCOPOIRATKII 
      WILM INGTON, DELAWARE 
SMOKLJMSS POWDER DEPARTMENT 
 
 
Copy tot Xr, Will ~zhbY 0. Walling 
        .C/o Ieaak\Waton League of Am. 
        222 North_    Drive, 
        Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
        404 Univ. Ave. Nafl* Bank  r 
        HaKAilnn WVim. 
 
 
                                          Eqr so 1931,p 
 
 
 
 
Dr. Ro     aldwin Ward 
Head of  olo1..1 Diison~, 
 
 
My dear Dr. Wr 
              Following out wy talk with you recently at the 
Izaak Walto League Conventions, I am attaching hereto coy of 
the "wroe4s Coopeativ 1,0 a1 Invstgtions and Dmensetrati~on 
for the iobwbite 4uail Belt of theISut.* The*e in.vetigations 
and demostrations. are bein gjotten up by the du Pnat weruoael, 
and operated by the Biolgica Surey.            e~eo 
 
 
              The mewryin Ide to fair     ly w 
   Te*deonstrations were rutabtpimil 
of our pve@Uonnl to Inue IMlwew. to practic 
In aooordano* with the stoddard method beoese of 
ties coenaxuug'aoot. Thi of course waso item 
Stoddard was nt unduly oco* 
 
 
by the inability 
 
wxith whi ch 
 
 
              This thought led to the adoptin of the T     I 
deonstratio which wes later en arqot to include Type I inesti- 
gations, bein as nearly as to necessary an praticable a dupli- 
cation of         so tye of wk in locations where, du  to 
tg                      coditions, etc., hie own Georgia fi 
     Ing niht ot vvy thus, these Type I inve stigations becoeea 
cotinuation of st~art'. original Investigations and should be 
productive of good results. 
              The woIoeet i     ivestigatleno and   &ontrations have

bees aco*ejtod by the Biological Suvy and several of the demonstra- 
tions are now being organised. It ~is ut* nosible that by the f all 
w  may haye o* or two of the Type I iavesotatiouo. L oeratiq 
The* twiolpa1 4iffieulty    to to be trained rersonel. Own 
to the roeet drought conditionas In the South, the shortage of 
birds ito so aute that cocperatlo and financing io a relatively 
minor consideration and ca aýmareutly be aconoished. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
Dr. Von"y Raldwia bWardy5,1 
 
 
         It to or hope that In a reasonable tine we can have 
a Ty   invstigtion gjoilU 14 evey    tieR of the SOUth DhewiU 
41fferout ontions      that thems T   I investigations will be 
Sby          a su ffioient n b e r of Ty 11 d o t on 
pove the feasibility of  eoying gane manment wetbods to 
the Irase of the quail crop. 
         eooless to may  this type of wok has bee goti on 
sc   a short time that we cnot oredit resultte an      therefre  re 
abstaining from all forms of p*ubiity* No woiul much zrefer to 
publish and capitalize on ach ivents after the fact an not before. 
         I thought that you would be intereste   in kowing that 
this type of work was going on an hence, this rather lengthy letter. 
ncildentally I say say that L      4ld is quite ethusati    and believes

that these demostration will be )rodueti  v  of results. 
         Jobs 1411, cur fiel4 wan tn your area, wh    yeu net at 
Chicago has interest*4 some Illinois s,"rton in the ?ys II 
sort of demonstration, and one 3f these may oe pt a     in the State 
of Illinois uner the superisiew of bZiltn, as this would be a 
little far for either Stoddard or Gr~c to muteroi in connection 
with the others. This Illinois ooject Is at the present time merely 
in the formative stage. 
         With beet wisheos  an 
 
                             ost   oyours# 
 
 
 
                                Drector of Consrvation. 
JOW!W/e 
 
 
Na So 1931, 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MV 9. 1931 
 
 
Major L. *. T. Waller, Jr. 
Director of Conservation 
1. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. 
WilmAigten, Delaware 
 
Dear ýajor: 
 
          Tanks for sendin   me the eorrensondence -bout 
the demonstration develo ments. 
 
          I contimt to be consideYrAly 7)uled abon the 
attiItde rnd. plans of the liolo,,ial urm.   I 7athered 
that when you si)oke to Rediwton in Chiiaro he apnreciated 
the difficulties, bit it  rnld appar th-at he '"a not had 
time to umtanle them.   If thre io anything you want me 
to do, I would 'be gla to tr  it on my next trT)p lat but 
I thiTn you cold do it better ad more prom-ptly. 
 
          I would like to rk-e it clear that I cannot 
obligate  Prrinton as to hIs relations to the Illinois 
project.  I have ta1],ed to him about the matter and I 
think he is enthusiastic about rivinr them a i1iited Lamount 
of tine, but until his deýree is coiraleted he wil", nerforc

have to restrict his contribution to that hich jriols re- 
search returns.  I wulrd rather have you nut it that Gra 
is the technical advlser with XrrI  otoo      lly help- 
ing out, than vice versa.  I will see Grange shortly and 
talk this over wIth him. 
 
                         Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
                                AIO LT, OLD 
                           In Clarge, Gae Srvey 
 
  

					
				
				
Copies to Messrs. -ansfield 
             Gordon 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                   .ov 2. 1930 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Do:r .,0,: 
 
u t    t t tid   ,t let     a f looalitiss, of a t1 
faoto al owe duiv h    , th dincns tho falls down 
Omh the Ill£inoi sit ton resovs ttef into a nedfor a ep- 
hons:  ve    t  tio   n     a n4 for a       'iae 
invest~t£ai  in orier to revt the aar£  of nerishbl m!- 
 
 
 
    evidnos       el wil isend itltr 
 
I t      s, to sn i      of Tet-n rioht -T cwn, even foh 
t y not     ely p e o  te. If te7     loft w.- for 
 
   shortayf itudfrnil Jun4iio for17 th-1t il  rn 
 
intiatin of s.o toe tore f r' nfv lie   t! od 
relatinoshn bewenOrtie an faa   s a  Ill et toe relation- 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Ao u      re   thorwii foir 'l~an  £  aie out, of a prelo a 
 
 
 
be of !e ix ~i onfe ti fo fo %h l tt% f ar ls In of ptoa 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  a for    an!     eanyos 
 
  

					
				
				
 
ALDO PEOPOLD= 
         A 
   ) 421 CHEMISTRY BLDG MADISON WIS=~ 
 
 
1930 NV 21 PM 9 214 
 
 
MANSFIELD HAS NOT PRODUCED EVIDENCE OF QUAIL DISEASE SERIOUSLY 
DOUBT VALUE SHORT TIME INVESTIGATION ILLINOIS QUAIL SITUATION 
SUGGEST GRANGE STOP THERE NEXT FIELD TRIP URGE COMPREHENSIVE 
 
INVESTIGATION ILLINOI-S WITH OUR COOPERATION= 
                                      REDINGTON. 
 
  

					
				
				
				
				
 
GapS... to: 20dinlton 
       Ollin 
       Stodard 
       Gordon~ 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
~r.         7 .ol. r. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     telc. o-tolone comoviati n I of @~rer, 414r -_ot havemr a 
verj lcai-zroly u*pportanty toV) *oe h w~u  fte~d~o 
tile I'll tnoils.  "aflt s titton   It foir -r t  ht  h  ie 
of a t1   oplt01 harbis              m e 
    smi ~s ~~~~w.Weof o,,rsen  !v o at1ý     for rz-, 
 
    V1~in d i te brd  -lute-r nlui t:he  ti 'y  hav lwat 
 
 
 
  atlo of 1 Athe                                 o 
 
 
      ~d . ~to mur fellowebip sb0dat  :1- 1 Il . 
at the -UmIver-si., irydic be a, vor,  _-- to-  ,~*a   Ialn  for 
 
 
 
 
   A~es,~lo  eI -ht. ItnlI-d In &t) Laý  ru  i 
h-a ese- In.  Is~k t1VW ) ro , folr- him t-lfveor 
team       ti 1%s 1-so t vrmorl 
 
  If) the v,ý ef idnoeA o" tip' cr i  ýVpmas  tzlx~ %1!,
cvtclea tr 
  stl ~elfttep~~~ofvIt       If to Abull t q'aIl i'711 n 
1Th1Alv r,ý Isý,I, lno f  m i 
 
 
     the~~~~~~~~~moc tol~~  h~  r Y i  o  eta I~ 
 
 
Yxrs sIroly, 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Copies to: Olin 
      Stoddard 
      Mansfield 
      Gordon 
 
 
    U, ~~lo 7,Il~el ~ 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    De3r fleli. 
 
 
i, x_-ec .t m   sr  ,ty  of 'ýa   InIt  l aitie rI ci  r- amAl 
 
-!ere Vi~1 * Fy'I  to  I o T, o  tro . 
 
   C.       "M o -asie d Da of-   "I ai 
            Ofic 171 j~ -V1 t M10t  til ',t rýflhno 7- th 
 
 _'Al cwcer  d nte at reporto t-1t  T-ae ~ias  u 
 
 
 
 not  50 c,,r cen:t Of las-t yer.  le rtn.y ntO4 Ieen 
 
 in7t                        ifty h on11too m vn m ed ton 
   640v bii inn-c-i as umd~r his 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ocp,1. tit "Mr. MansfnI 1  rv ,orts- ~tll On ~i  1c  n ~ m 
    1    nof y       Uonteons  toa 
or tra     ccy.m'mo!-y 'oin with hi117ý 
I doý not &v e11ht  odn si   o ti  o 
  .hat tý tn    to'm ie a U od -1ý%t ~t il r c nt 
  wiri  ti~ orr sI  yiao  heeiec  o -s ft 
  r-a r I - is( uat 'IatO~         fvd u . t~ t t e ~ r x t 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
as folloews 
 
 
      strrrn ninaty of trafl dire  m-l.t oropei -,,m rei 
 
      lff-rw  to pvtrael !~n~r,c-* ýý  vra .-,t  'todda' I
 olr ot'her 
 
 
 
you to ara-e  n,, -rricnt atiot.n oa An ý th iit -t r  Tallý-s'A
 -)irs Ai 
 
  be wul-1on I. '1  mt not.  At paxt oif it,-r -owwr. th1r4- cn, 
Jutly beý left to ifrni)sot~ t_% 11A  can arlr~- to p 
the tIl-I s         tey wllt o1i adast a 
  eoyof VAi! letttr to 11r. Infl  ~o!ry 
 
 
    widae o th ,tet)f Nhe o ota~ h  ont~    if oinr, 
 with,- the r wdr.,Ah. ,:-3 1- e  va!Iup mlbt thinto  thes 1Xlli1'14 
 sootsn J! to Vie .,rvq 
 
    .r. "ansfield# in roAst1 hi red  oeve nmtei1n 
t he i:, of Cacseso ir birds fo! tl  r~mtiAn. 
 
    ?!bjeb(eot In 7wýiv- ymz r~v to f clI it-At -)tti ly Into the
flield 
 ~~dbly beoi,7e of t'hr -e-~ter  a f i*i  oli'  ido 
 
 ee theo            Yteaýu r~Qtkzesi of 117i iý)-n pa-rt. 
 
   T   nl~ao~    of ths otýn"diets th t hle will1 
 r1i-Aow ýre sýt-Amt Cthe ctxsasIn the event r  ak te ats 
 I~ihm   Itý-keit that   nn. inn            vf 
   seni~ n et~copy to him-.- 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
        ; 11    the Illinois flvision of the Izaak Walton 
 
Learue of Aaerioa hap requested approval by the National E- 
 
ecutive Boord of the League, of the 14,G   .0 bond Ise    bill 
sponsor.d by the Ilinois    ivision, nasaed by the Illinois Leg- 
ivlatire, end to be submitted to A referendum of the voatve of 
Illinois at the fall eleotior of 1930, and 
       'EAS, the Faid bill,a5 drawn, can furnish little if 
 
anything euggestive of example for use nationally, or in other 
statps, and will not serve as an edumational effort for   altqr- 
ian ptwpoqs, and the la     etblo ait of this mepsure to acquire 
lands for pnlio rarposes. will be obsoured completel) by at- 
tack in numerous ither sufficiently valid 
 
                XWC,            RQ~~ IT I? Th'$OLVi, that 
          the Tyeoutive noard of the Iza.k Waltn League 
          of kAmserai coend the ende souigt to be ob- 
          tninýd by the Illinois 7loa  Issue Teferenddu 
          rill, In obtainingý for perpet!i1 pablic use, 
          roree~ttonal and rofuta-,, areas, and, In the re- 
          storation anid preervation of umwisely drained 
          awas lands, Irovided there be combined with 
          stoh aoquisition, aequate control of expen- 
          dittures of pitlio funds and sufficient non- 
          politioal aInistrative machinery for the 
          solentific hAndling of the conservation prob- 
          lems involved. 
 
 
       Adopted July let, 1950. 
 
                                    I 
 
 
 
      [                      i/ 
 
  

					
				
				
 
                    INDIAN REFINING COMPANY 
                              INCORPORATED 
                        LAWRENCEVILLE, ILLINOIS 
 
 
OSCAR JOHN DORWIN 
     GENERAL COUNSEL                    August 27, 1930. 
 
 
Aldo Leopold, Esq., 
     421 Chemistry Building, 
          Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
Dear Aldo: 
 
 
          Olive is under the weather as a re   it or a strained 
back, and I am therefore replying for her t your letter of the 
21st. The nan of whom she spoke is S. H. E ton, and his address 
is simply Lawrenceville, Illinois. I have talked with him and 
he says that Grey Foxes are probably extinct here at the present 
time. At least, he has not seen any, an  he knows that many 
years ago they were reported as having been very rare. Red Foxes, 
however, are becoming more numerous.   If by wolves you mean what 
is known here as coyotes, there are some reported occasionally. 
A den of coyotes was found in Crawford County this su~m'er. There 
is at least one crow roost in Lawrence County and one in Richland 
County, both in the northern part of the counties. He does not 
know how old they are. He is of the opinion that Feral Cats are 
fairly numerous. He infers this from the tracks in the snow in 
the woods. They are frequently traded by coon hunters. He does 
not, however, know of any dens. Also, he. knows of no Bob Cats in 
this vicinity. 
 
          I trust that the foregoing will give you at least part 
of the information that you are seeking. Olive and I are hoping 
that your work will take you back to Lawrenceville soon. 
 
          With very best wishes from both of us, I am 
 
                                     Very sincerely yours, 
 
 
OJD:MRG 
 
  

					
				
				
 
PREDATORS 
 
 
LEGEND 
 
 
Sample Populations perTwp. 
(®)Foxes (solid = realdata) 
         (dash =etimata) 
 I] Bobcats 
 
 
<, Feral Housecats 
., Wolves 
U Few or no foxes present 
 
 
*I Present Crow Roos~t ( known age to left 
o Former Crow Roost (date last used to rnght) 
-epresent range of Gray Fox(in sofar .as 
      determined during survey) 
I0:5 Present Red: Grey Fox Ratio (estimated) 
     Gry o     date first se_.en loft, lest seen right. 
     Feral Housecats seen with dens and young 
     in the wild away from buildings. 
SFeral Housecats see    wintering in the wild. 
*, Feral Housecots do not winter in th4 wild. 
 
 
Orays abr, ir 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
                                     STATE OF ILLINOIS 
                         DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
                                        SPRINGFIELD 
 
 
  DIVISION OF FORESTRY                                                ROOM
600 STATE CAPITOL 
LEWIS B. SPRINGER, SUPERINTENDENT                                  TELEPHONE:
CAPITOL 1400 STATION 57 
                                           August 25, 1930. 
 
 
 
 
              Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
              In Charge, Game Survey, 
              421 Chemistry Building, 
              Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
 
              My dear Leopold: 
 
 
                     Your letter of Tuly 30 requesting statistics on 
             the importations of Mexican quail had been delayed because 
             I was out of the office about a month only getting back just

             before the State Fair. 
 
                     Your figures for 1925, 1926 and 1927, I think are  V

             correct and I find out from the main office that there have

             been no quail imported since 1927 with the exception of 100

             pair which were recently purchased I think through a Mr. Coleman

             of Virginia or West Virginia, for use at the Springfield Game

             Farm* You may not know that at the State Fair Grounds they 
             have fenced off 40 acres with a good steel fence and they are

             starting in to produce quail, pheasants and wild turkey. They

             also have a plot of 5 acres on the State Forest at Anna surrounded

             by a good woven wire fence and believe it is their intention
to 
             raise wild turkey on this tract. Of course if you are in the

             state we would be very glad to have you look these things over.

             The turkies have not yet been introduced into the pen in southern

             Illinois but I understand will be this fall. 
 
                     Trusting that under the circumstances you will pardon

            my delay in answering your letter and wishing you the best of

            success in your work, I remain, 
 
 
                                           Very sincerely yours, 
 
 
 
                                                     Chief Forester 
 
 
            RBM:R 
            enc. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
                     GAME SURVEY                                     PA,

                         CONDUCTED FOR THE 
           SPORTING ARMS AND AMMUNITION MANUFACTURERS' INSTITUTE 
                         BY ALDO LEOPOLD 
                       MADISON. WISCONSIN 
 
 
'ALI~ &,4b $&4 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                     Cýtt 
 
 
 
 
 
                               4 t, c                       .5 
          /                                                             
                     ) 
 
 
2, 
 
 
c--                                        0 I 
*-0ý 
 
 
lv I .?,A,-               - 
 
 
                                                                LLr4 &

 
            cit 
 
  

					
				
				
                   ALL AGREEMENTS ARE CONTINGENT UPON STRIKES. FIRE, FLOOD,
ACCIDENTS,OR OTHER 
                          CONDITIONS UNAVOIDABLE OR BEYOND OUR CONTROLý

  C                     ADDRESS ALL CORRESPONDENCE TO THE COMPANY, 
 
 
                                MANUFACTURERS 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                March 20, 1930. 
 
 
 
        Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
        421 Chemistry Building (U. W.), 
        Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
        Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
                 I have now secured the information requested in 
        your letter of February 21st regarding the status of Illinois 
        planted Hungarian partridges. I am attaching a copy of your 
        letter, the questions in which have been marked I, II, III 
        and IV. The answers are as follows: 
 
        I.       Three covies have been seen between the Hospital 
        grounds and Fosterburg, averaging from 17 to 18 birds in a 
        covey. The Hospital referred to is the Alton State Hospital 
        for Insane. The Game Farm is located on these grounds. This 
[yU     property is North of our Powder Company's grounds. Foster- 
        burg is about 7 miles Northeast of the Hospital. 
 
                  In addition to these three covies, five covies have 
        been seen on the State Game Farm grounds, averaging about the 
        same number of birds per covey; namely, 17 to 18. 
 
        IT.       These observations were last made in February, 1930; 
        aiut the middle of the month. 
 
        III      Observttions similar to those quoted above were made 
        foF the three years after the plant and at various times during 
        the three years. 
 
        IV.       There has been evidence of breeding. Mr. Metcalf 
        sf--tes in February and March, but I doubt this. The rest of 
        his statement is that eggs and young birds have been seen. 
        The nesting has taken place in open fields and quite often 
        the birds have bua their nests in depressions in the ground 
        caused by a horse's hoof resulting in destruction when wet 
        weather comes. 
 
                  From the above information I am satisfied that Hungarians

        are still in this vicinity and that there will be some propaga- 
 
  

					
				
				
 
                     Maroh 20, 1930; 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold - Page 2 
 
 
tion this year. I will try to secure more information as the 
 
year progresses. 
 
 
 
                       Yours very truly, 
 
 
ent 
 
 
g.M.Olin:W 
 
  

					
				
				
 
41 
 
 
ary 21 1930 
 
 
Mr.I~, JA . t 
Wes tern Carti"Co 
 
 
Dear Vr. Mo~s 
 
 
1   g to* shw the sttu of ZIlinois plants Imoitlyars 
the river. 
 
   Las~t yea. whl I was main tbe 11e1               w 
           £&U 1*       -4 --b%-  a.*&A       ýWI  
 Al* 
 
 
YOU 141% -    # ,Y .74 N1R~V       W.1 Yw .      wMe    ix" 
 
 
 
 
 
drift birds seen 15 miles norh, or wer there still~ soeinh 
vicinity of Alton? 
 
 
               Whner the drift birds seen la 1927, 1929, 01P 
1929t 
 
 
 
 
 
 
your repy c em  sawib~4 os the margin. 
 
 
 
     you think in Psi~tion to answer thoebM    etos 
 
               Tkwkig ou for your~ hel   in lo ing uptis fst141, 
 
                            you" sincerey 
 
 
                            ALD LEOPOLD 
 
 
1001. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
         GAME SURVEY 
             CONDUCTED FOR THE 
SPORTING ARMS AND AMMUNITION MANUFACTURERS' INSTITUTE 
            By ALDO LEOPOLD 
            421 CHEMISTRY BLOG 
            MADISON, WISCONSIN 
         February 28, 1930 
 
 
Mr. L. 0. Dadant 
Bee Supplies 
Hamilton, Illinois 
 
Dear Mr. Dadant: 
 
           Mr. T. E. Musselman of Qu~incy told. me .recently 
that you have in your com~pany a Mr. Pellet, who may have 
evidence as to fall'migrations"of quail. Mr. Musselman 
remembers somebody from your region telling him that quail 
were seen flying southward across the Mississippi. I would 
greatly appreciate your handing this letter to Mr. Pellet 
and letting me h1ave any evidence in your or his possession 
bearing on this mooted question. 
 
           I desire this information for my report on the 
game survey of Missouri, which I have just completed. If 
your reply can reach me within a week it will be much ap- 
preciated. 
 
           Withi kindest regards, 
 
                                Yours sincerely, 
 
                                    atdA(~ 
 
                                 A.LDO LEOQPOLD 
                             In Charge, Game Survey 
 
 
Dear ir Leopold; - 
                     This letter was mili.an. lias just comne to 
 light. I reg-ret that I am unable to give you any iniformiation 
 whih will be helpf~ul to you. The uirtosof qulal as I have 
observed', them arei very linited and- T have not personally seen 
any of the,. birds¶ flying, across the 1I-Assissippi. 
 
                     Very truly yours 
 
 
                                         Frank C. Pellett 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
421 C'h1ist' n)-lilr 
 
 
                                             July 12,, 1929 
 
 
 
'ru of             S1gic u rey 
Tabinctin, D, C 
 
Dear Ko~te*: 
 
         Ar, te i-ion t i3 sa, itnd           o    e  h3, an 
r appreciate your ts!ik. the troabe to Qo:-:a  in detail on my 
Illinois report. As I h;ave said before, my Vratest 1.4ek to cu 
rent critIis and I anvezr uagtioaa to &a   41 of this Iman 
 
       As to glaclatiozz and phman  I crtaýinly are with you 
that their relatlom io merely 4,,r hypothesis. If T have implie 
otherwe in m   reports I hereb bak wter, 
 
         I h.ve 'herd of the      es on Sploe Island bt 
urtood they were constantly bin recrutd 'y artificial prop. 
gation, Cn you tel t -  ethr o o this     a fat?  If It in 
the cae of ooIrse dos- not constitute evlIýiene of survivl in a 
wild etute. If it is no)t, the ther is one hole in the   lac$iatio 
hypothesis, and a large one. 
 
 
                             You~rs sincerely, 
 
 
                                In Charge, Gwie Survey 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
                                              June 7, 1929, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Mr. le$ington: 
 
         I find Mr. Lepold's re-ort ver inteestng and it has 
  v.Wle, I, too, think with Mr. MEetee that ia his thr conern 
  ing glaciation Mr. Leoold Is goin somehat far awteld for a 
  0v5e      factor in gme bird       tion. This, if an Influence, 
  is probably of miner     on. 
 
         In hi. onalaalons rlaatlve to the   t     forer relattin- 
  hi- Vr. Leepld is on a      , progressive iP, I think, He cites 
  a singl instamce and I ia en to know of seval similar arrange- 
  mrnts that are now in ofet or i4er wy.   I believe that this 
  qstem- in nse in         , by the wV, sinxe the War anA the 
  resltant breain4  m- of large egtate. - Will come gTenerally into 
  use In this c  t   *er* ixland ý,   is considered. I believe it

  is a satistory method and should be welc   .ed, It will, however, 
  greatly restrict that  ber of peole who will hoot re. The 
  pools will b~e limited and th. feet sufficiently high to dey the 
  nrivile.s to a vey lar"g       tin of   srt          .ers, Yet, 
  excet for ruch restrictions, Ar-tam-npland shooting canot 
 
         Mr. Le.  dl' conclueions as to esforement work nd the 
  necoveity for bter cooertion betwe    Federal and State officers 
  is generally tra - pwrticularly Un  of the district covered by 
  the eport - but it is noet nw to s nor is it, I think, due to 
  n   nelect or indifference on the part of the Suvey. 
         Mr. Leopold's statistics on ge birds are interestin and, 
  I think, as accurate as conditions will perit* 
 
         The cat discussion is valuable and indicates the distinction 
  that is wrout by this useless reatue. Tt bobcats will attr 
and kill housecats is a fact ftty w1ll established, I believe, 
  I have known of Instances. 
 
 
/S/ H. P. Sheldon 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                June 3, 1929. 
 
 
 
  Mr. Redington: 
 
         I would submit the following counent on Mr. Leopold's game 
  survey of Illinois.   Leopold seems still to be sold (page 6) on the 
  relation of glaciation to the distribution of pheasants.   I think 
  that this should be treated merely as a hypothesis; consider the suc- 
  cass now being had with pheasants on Sapeloe Iseand. Personally I 
.Phink that establishment of pheasants, Hungarian partridges, and other 
  adaptable game birds is in relation to the intensity of the efforts 
  that are made toward this end.   We observe the growing of plants in 
  wide areas having no relation to the original distribution of the 
  species; the same is true, of domeatietted animals, and I think the 
  artificial aid that is given the introduced game birds has much the 
  same effect on enabling them to live over wide areas and under a great

  variety of conditions. 
 
         The program for reestablishment of quail outlined on pages 20 to

  21 seem very commendable. 
 
         On page 34, Leopold refers to "the dispute as to whether quail

  eat chinch bugs." There may be a dispute as to this matter, but there

  is no doubt as to the fact that quails do eat chinch bugs and scme 
  times in large numbers. 
 
         Leopold stresses the importance of refuges at various points in

  the report, both for the protection of upland gae as well as migra- 
  tory wild fowl.   In this I think he is entirely right, and he will be

  pleased to know that our program calls for the establishment of 
  Federal migratory bird refuges in Illinois.   His suggestions along 
  this line will be useful and I will see that Mr. Uhler, who is to do 
  the work in that area, is informed about them. 
 
        The case mentioned and Leopold's reooaundations resulting from 
  it on pages 58 to 62 is of considerable interest. Apparently here is 
  a new lead in getting cooperation between sportsmen and farmers and 
  one that seems much more hopeful than education of individual farmers.

 
         Of interest to Federal officers enforcing game laws is Leopold's

  statement on page 41 that hunters in Illinois, even at the duck clubs,

  shoot the Federal limit of 25 rather than the State limit of 15. His 
  allusion on page 49 to lack of cooperation between the State and 
  Federal game wardens also is worthy of attention. 
 
 
1. L. XoATIR 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
                   UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
                            BUREAU OF BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 
                                      WASHINGTON. D. C. 
      ADDRES8 REPLY TO 
OHIEF. BUREAU OF BIOLOGIOAL SURVEY 
       AND REFER TO 
 
                                                       tuly 9, 1929. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
                       421 Chemistry Building, 
                              tadison, Wisconsin. 
 
                My dear Leo: 
 
                       I m sending you herewith, for what they ma   be 
                worth to you, copies of memoranda given me by Messrs. 
                icAtee and Sheldon after they had gove over your Illinois

                report. 
 
                       The report in certainly a most comprehensive one 
                and gives a mighty clear picture of many aspects of the 
                game problem in Illinois.     I hope it will be possible

                for you to work out a plan similar to those that have 
                been consummated in other States to get experts on the 
                job to follow up the leads which you have given them for

                Illinois. 
 
                       I am leaving to-morrow for & three and a half

               months' trip in the West and will probably not see you 
               until my return.    I hope that the ensuing months will 
               be good ones for you.    I know they will be busy ones, 
               and I trust that throughout it you and your family may 
               enjoy the best of health. 
 
                                        Sincerely yours, 
 
 
 
 
                                                    Paul G. Red    on 
                                                         Chief. 
 
 
Inclosure B-7413 
 
  

					
				
				
 
M. G. LAMBERT. PRESIDENT                                               A.
H. GRAHAM. SECRETARY 
   W. B. CURTIS. VICE-PRESIDENT                                         
  E. 0. REAUGH. TREASURER 
 
 
                   Hancock County Farm Bureau 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS                    CARTHAGE, ILLINOIS                
  BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
   W. S. FELGAR                                                         
     I. M. CRABIL. 
   BURTON E. KING                          TELEPHONE NO. 30             
     C. P. GRIFFITHS 
   J. F. CREAR                                                          
     W. B. CURTIS 
   W. 0. KUNKEL            J. H. LLOYD. FARM ADVISER  H. R. BAKER. COUNTY
CLUB LEADER  M. G. LAMBERT 
   W. J. CARLIN                                                         
     ARTHUR KRAUSHAAR 
   EDW. FORE£MAN                 L. W. BAXTER. MANAGER INSURANCE DEPARTMENT
  EDWARD ROLLIN 
   WM. W. HULL                                                          
     IRA S. POWELL 
   C. W. SIMMONS                   THERESE ROSENBOOM. OFFICE SECRETARY  
      H. R. GRAHAM 
   C. W. RINEHART                                                       
      BEN BODECKER 
   W. A. VANCE                                                          
      P. A. FULTON 
   ERNEST PAINTER                                                       
      PHILIP H. BUCKERT 
   D. H. STEVENSON                                                      
     ROBERT M. COCHRAN 
   GEORGE MARZOLP                     April 1i, 1929. 
 
         Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
 
         Madison Wisconsin. 
 
         Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
         I very much regret that I did not get to see you when you were in

         Hancock County. 
 
         Mr.Dadant called me yesterdayýnd asked for a conference on
the 
         project that you suggested to him. 'e hope that this can be arranged

         within the next few days and I will give it my personal attention,

         because I am very much interested in the game propagation, expecially

         the bob-white. 
 
         With reference to the pheasant project, I must confess that he is
a 
         bird in which I am not interested. My home is at Girard, Illinois,

         a few miles south of the State Game Farm conducted for a number
of 
         years by Dr. Wheeler. Many pehasants were released from this Farm

         and they became quite numerous in that section of the State. The

         pheasant is a very poor substitute for a game bird, and the shooting

         of pheasants is just about as sporty as the shooting of plymouth
rock 
         hens. 
 
      I As a matter of fact, I do not believe that the ring-neck pheasant

         has become very well established in the southeastern part of Hancock

         County. I have hunted quail over a considerable portion of that

         territory and was down there on several hunts last year. Only on

         one occassion did I have an opportunity to shoot a ring-neck pheasant

         and that was during the closed season. Possibly my dogs worked on

         these pheasants on one or two other occassions but no finds were

         made because the birds would not lie for the dogs. 
 
         This habit of the ring-neck pheasant together with the fact that

         apparently pheasants and quail do not thrive in the same cover,

         is the reason why I m not enthusiastic about this imported bird.

         What I would like to see done is to try out the Hungarian Partridge,

         which I am informed, is a real game bird. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Mr. A. L. -2 
 
 
In the territory in this State where the ring-neck pheasant has 
become established, I am certain that there is a tendency upon 
the part of the large majority of the hunters, especially the farm 
boys, to disregard game laws as applyed to that bird, and that 
is one reason why I believe and hope that it will be impossible 
to propagate the species in any considerable numbers. 
 
We need some reliable information about practical methods of 
quail propagation and I will be very glad indeed to confer with 
Mr. Dadant and other sportsmen in this territory who are interested 
in this project, with a view toward accomplishing the end that 
you have in mind. 
 
With best wishes, I am 
 
  

					
				
				
i lie 
 
 
mot Yr. T~r 
 
 
 
it I"p to as to fum Owp fat$ 000MMuwTIdyusa 
-1M as" - tm M N fro u som~ ta 0" 04 and *It sum? 
Al  MINa is~ **w 00 *Pm womwse wam0t 
 
 
 
""U to ft tt6mdvU*b It I wVdt glad for Y 
to *,* it o~W. 
 
 
         rmmkiTm yo  o yrcooeai 
 
                   yors8l0o 
                   AZW Ug. ,W 
        '1 Chan* ft         U"7 
 
  

				
      
      
				
				
 
              STATE OF ILLINOIS 
 
    NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY DIVISION 
                 URBANA 
 
                         1-10447 
 
Dear Aldo: 
 
       Th1s annoucement came in the paper 
Wednesday night. Thought you would be 
interested to hear Mills has been made 
Chief, if you you haven't already heard it. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Montana State Entomologist 
 
To Head History Survey 
 
 
   DoctorU Harl'o w B. mills 25, stat 
 entomologist, professor and head 
 of the department of zoology and 
 entomology, Montana State college, 
 Bozeman, Mont., since 1937, en 
 Wednesday was named chief of the 
 Illinois State Natural History sur- 
 vey at the University of Illinois. 
   Director Frank G. ThOmpson of 
 the state department of registra- 
 tion and education, following a 
 mail ballot by members of the state 
 board of natural resources and con- 
 servation, announced the appoint- 
 ment of Doctor Mills, effective 
 March 1. 
   There will be a meeting of the 
 state board here on February 3, 
 and it is believed the new chief 
 may attend that session. He suc- 
 ceeds the late Doctor Theodore H. 
 Frison, who died Dec. 9, 1945. Since 
 the death of Doctor Frison, Doctor 
 Leo R. Tehon, botanist and head 
 of the survey's section of applied 
 botany and plant pathology, has 
 been acting chief of the survey. 
 Selected From Five 
 Doctor Mills was selected from 
Jve outstanding educators after 
 
 
been narrowed. His experience has     HARLOW       B. MILLS 
included a research aisistantship 
in the Iowa and Texas agricultdral    . . . new   survey chief 
experiment stations, and with the     -- 
U~nited States dennrmnt of arf i. 
 
 
culture in Louisiana. He servedar 
as assistant profeussor of entomols 
ogy   and  wildlife technician  at 
Texas Agricultural and Mechan- 
ical university, 1930-31; ranger 
naturalist and wildlife technician,f 
Yellowstone National park, 1934- 
35, and assistant state entomol- 
ogist, Montana, 1935-37.         0 
   He has published over 40 papers f 
 and books in the fields of sys- 
 tematic and economic entomology, 
 mammalogy and ornithology, plus 
 several magazine articles. 
   Professor Carl G. Hartman. sec. no 
 retary of the Illinois state board pe 
 of natural resources and conser- itE 
 vation, said of the appointment of m 
 Doctor Mills:                    st 
   "The state board of natural re- 
 sources'and conservation has been 
 most deiberate in canvassing the 
 country for a man to succeed the a 
 late Doctor Theodore Frison, who F 
 combined scientific attainment, ex- t: 
 ecutive ability and a captivating s 
 personality to a rare degree. The i 
 board's choice from among -a list n 
 of prominent and well qualified 8 
 men, including  local  personnel, N 
 Doctor Harlow B. Mills of Mon- 
 tana, is an accomplished entomolo- I 
 gist, a successful executive, and a I 
 fine neighbor. He has been able I 
 to sell conservation research,'par- c 
 ticularly insect studies and insect I 
 control, to the state of Montana f 
 and its legislature. Recently the 
 state college had asked him to or- 
 ganize and   head  its  graduate a 
 school. Doctor Mills has studied v 
 the Big Horn in the Rookies at t 
 first hand and is aninveterate 
 hunter  and   flsherman;   hence 
 speaks the language of the sports 
 man. It is my opinion that Doc- 
 tor Mills will continue the fine Ira- 
 ditin ofno~t 
      "Tebard greatly appreciates c 
 the effcient interim administra- 
 tion of the affairs of the Natural t 
 History survey by Doctor Leo Te- 
 hon, head of the section of appplied 
 botany and plant pathology, a po- 
 sition which he has filled with dis- 
 tinction since 1921." 
 Doctor Mills was born Aug. 20, 
 1906, at LeGrand, Ia. He married 
 Esther Brewer,- Central City, Ia., 
 on Aug. 27, 1930. They have three 
 children, David Harlow, 14; Gary 
 Paul, 13, and Judith Anne, 6. 
 Holds Iowa State Degrees 
 After attending the LeGrand pub- 
 lic schools, graduating in 1924 from 
 high school, he went to Iowa State 
 College, being enrolled there peri- 
odically between 1924 and 1934. He 
received a bachelor of ocience de- 
gree in 1929, a master of science 
degree In 1930, and a doctor of 
philosophy degree in 1934. 
  His   organization memberships 
include: Sigma Xi, Gamma Sigma 
Alpha, Phi Sigma, Phi Mu Alpha, 
American Association of Economic 
Entomologists,   F el ow     1938 
Entomological Society of America, 
charter member of Wildlife so- 
ciety, Montana Academy of Sci- 
ences, past president, American As- 
sociation for the Advancement of 
Science. 
  Doctor Mills' other#activities In- 
  clude: Secretary state leader's ad- 
  visory committee on grasshopper 
  control; national research council 
  committee -on wildlifeand subcom- 
  mittee on insect control; editor of 
  Journal of Wildlife, and secretary 
  of Montana state board of ento- 
  m otoe . ... .. .. . .. .. . . . 
  He also is a member of Rotary, 
  Elks, and served as president of 
  the Bozeman council of parents 
  and teachers. 
 
  MRS',-r 
 
 
Hf 
 
 
A 
 
 
cl 
 
 
 
ent. 
Pita 
we( 
Doe 
mneE 
ary 
of 
 
ins 
ant 
Tu 
 
 
 
thi 
 
pa, 
511 
toý 
en 
ft 
w 
 
  

					
				
				
 
MAPS 
 
 
OF 
 
 
ILLINOIS QUAIL EXPERIMENTAL 
 
 
                     AREA 
 
 
COOPERATING 
 
 
   ILLINOIS NATURAL 
 
ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT 
 
 
AGENCIES 
 
 
HISTORY 
 
 
SURVEY 
 
 
OF CONSERVATION 
 
 
U. S. FISH AND WILDLIFE 
 
 
SERVICE 
 
 
FA.P. 1 8-R 
 
 
SPRINGFIELD 
 
 
NHICAGO 
 
 
 
 
 
JRBANA 
 
 
QUAIL AREA 
 
 
4IEWTO N 
 
  

					
				
				
 
JASPER 
 
 
COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
MAP SYMBOLS 
 
 
FAL FALLOW LAND 
FAS, P PASTURE LAND 
CUL  CULTIVATED LAN 
wDS, w WOODLAND 
BR   BRUSHLAND 
MIX  MIXED HERBAC+ 
OR   ORCHARD 
 
 
JD 
 
 
  GR  GRASSLAND 
  G   GARDEN 
     SECTION  LI NE 
R     RAI L ROAD 
H HIGHWAY 
    " "GRAVEL ROAD 
    ----.DIRT  ROAD 
-=-UNIMPROVED ROAD 
-   .T R RAIL 
 
 
   """....VEG.  TYPE  LI NE 
"---+-SPARSE FENCEROW 
..---"MEDIUM FENCEROW 
---ti----D E N S E FENCEROW 
     H E DGEROW 
     ISOLATED \TREE 
     FENCE  LINE 
     LAKE 
   Q WATER  HOLE 
   in SCHOOL 
C E.M CEMETERY 
  a  BUILDI NG 
     IMPROVEMENT AREA 
 -)I(-  BRIDGE 
 ""t" "%* INTERMITTANT  STREAM 
 J  STRAW  STACK 
 
 
SCALE 
 
 
8  1 MILE 
 
 
FIELD WORK BY 
 
 
C. SPOONER 
0. T(EMEIE R 
 
 
AUGUST 1942 
 
 
DRAWN BY 
C. S. SPOONER 
 
  

					
				
				
 
JASPER COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 33 
 
 
T7N. 
 
 
R. 9E. 
 
 
PA S 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CU L 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
I' 
II 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
'I 
'I 
S~CUL 
 
 
 
 
I 
I:M 
,r  - -1- 
 
 
II 
 
 
11 
 
 
I' 
II 
II 
II 
 
, 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
LEGEND 
 
 
1 
 
 
cur 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
 
I1 
 
  

					
				
				
 
JASPER 
 
 
COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 34 
 
 
T 7N. 
 
 
R. 9E. 
 
 
LEGEND 
 
 
N 
I 
 
  

					
				
				
 
JASPER 
 
 
COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 28. T7N. R.9E. 
 
 
  BR-PAZ 
1**.. 
1WD3: 
r **e. ** 
 
 
9. 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
* wpS-*. 
: PA5 
 
 
*       I 
  * *. I 
 
 
VD S 
 
 
.' C * 
 
. 
 
 
UL 
 
 
C UL 
 
 
*.WDS 
* 9 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
PA S 
 
 
C UL 
 
 
PA S 
 
 
3 
 
 
*% 
i 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
JASPER 
 
 
COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 27 
 
 
T 7N. R, 9E. 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
PAS 
 
 
PAS - 
 
 
  - BR-PAS 
 
 
 
C IM PAS 
 
 
PA3 
 
 
BR-WDS 
 
 
PAS 
 
 
tA 
 
 
:BR* 
 
 
C UL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
;B R 
 
 
"CUL .CU'  : . L CUL 
     '".    i( 
 
 
M     AI..PA RAS 
  -BR 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  CUL .B f CUL 
 
      :: ,."  
 
 
I 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
PASU 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
.. :1 ; ,    "; x +'' 4  :" :"'- +" - '- .+-- 
 
 
..'a 
 
 
Wi5S 
 
 
,AS'.,'. PA 5 
 
 
 
 
 
PAS 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
   '" ,- 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
B R 
 
 
FA L 
 
 
"B'. F" 
 
 
Iwos 
 
 
. ." 
CUL PAS  .BR 
 
 
 
   IIPAS5 PAS3  RBA 
 
 
         PAS 
 
 
v   :/-CrJL .': L 
 
 
wD 5 
 
 
-.. 
CUL 
 
Fm IIP 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
WDiS 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
PAS 
 
 
b R 
 
 
PAS - 
 
 
*... ...... .... .. -  C 
Wi'S 
 
     ".FAL FAL 
 
 
 
   L . .' ' D>  S 
 
 ,r" .' .BR, 'WDS  " 
 
 
4 
 
 
IMP 
OR 
 
 
PA S 
 
 
C UL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
.                     I 
 
 
BR. 
 
 
Ai  )1     .. 
 
 
w  DJ 
 
 
I   -- 
 
 
... + -.... r ! 
  i 
 
 
°. 
 
 
'1 
 
 
o 
 
 
" " IMF .. 
 
 
... 
 
 
! 
 
 
* .--       ... 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
JASPER 
 
 
COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 21  T 7 N. R.9E. 
 
 
II 
 
 
PAS     WDS ., 
         rPA 5 
 
 
0.PA S 
 
 
CUL      :Wo 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
WDS 
 
 
U 
 
 
WD0 
 
 
C 
 
 
     IMP 
       PAS 
BR-PAS 
 
   I.. 
 
 
WD S- PAS 
 
 
-PA S 
 
 
I -                         - 
 
 
MP WOD  CUL5 
 
 
 
UL *.#,4,. BR 
 
 
 
   " .. . . .. ... . . . ... LI.. 
 
 
WDb 
 
 
     XB R 
"'C,"- """;" - - m i.x" "    
 
 
I       * - .  . .. . . ..o *. 
      UL "R W. DS      C 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  :   U L       .R     CU 
              CULCU 
           0 R 
   WDS 
          A# 
 
 
        ..:; ' cA      S , 
        C1 
 
              ~. IMP I*I9 
 
 
BI 
 
 
WDS- 
 
 
PAS                   C 
 
 
     CUL: 
"c. 
 
 
WDS- 4S 'CUL 
 
 
 
         CU L 
 
WDS         'UC." 
  4 ,  .. ...... .... . ' - -  - 
       CUL      1 
 
            'If 
 
 
 "" "UL'/- I': 
   " "*" .';" II ,* 
 
 
'A 
 
 
C UtL 
 
 
WDS     I.- MI 
 
 
I: 
I.... 
p 
 
 
I 
/ 
 
 
/ 
 
 
BR- / 
MIX/ 
 
 
I,... 
 
 
x i~~ CUL .! 
.." .: V .. .1' 
 
 
* BR 
 
 
WDS 
 
 
UL 
 
 
BR- 
 
PA5 
 
 
  ':. 
 
  imP 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
 
 
 
V! oo 
 
 
          S. 
 
- MI. 
 
 
5 
 
 
.    hff    IT 
 
 
Ii *  I               * 
 
 
II 
 
 
CU 
 
WOD5 
 
 
6 
 
 
BAI - mix 
 
  

					
				
				
 
JASPER 
 
 
COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 22 
 
 
T. 7N. R. 9E. 
 
 
CUL I C UL 
 
-. -v-  U  L 
 
CUL. I CUL-'": 
 
 
SMlX"     .... .. " 
 
 
cu 
 
 
'1. 
 
 
22 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
.wo 5.. 
 
 
X 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL 
"*'" - .o, "I: 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
   .4 
 
CUL )* 
 
 
.R 
 
 
CU L* 
     ".L   C 
 
 
     I     . 
 
-      CUL "' . C oi o 
 
     .I : ... . I 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
MI 
 
 
N 
 
 
6 
 
 
CU L 
 
 
N 
 
 
C U . 
 
 
IL 
 
 
.' 
 
 
I 
 
 
I,* 
 
 
J. 
 
 
I 
I 
I 
 
 
1 
f 
I 
 
 
W0. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
JASPER 
 
 
COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 16   T7NN   R.9E. 
 
 
BR 
 
 
WDS 
 
 
      MIX 
 
 
  BR 
 
  B R 
 
I 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
 
  !( o-". . .. . ..° 
  I.:8 
I/ 
 
 
     CUL 
 
 
 
iII 
I'CUL           _ 
 
 
     :; B R 
If- 
     -: BR. BR 
 
 
   IIf 
"BR . MIX PAS 
       I . . T 
 
 
                                NI 
- - - - -   :.. 
      .1     . '. BR                              N 
 
 
      "CUL    ¾ CUL 
   .*.          . ..     .. 
   ......     ... 
                            WDS     C UL 
 
 
     WDS           CUL 
:BR *            *."  .       B R.. 
     "................ 
 
 
 
                     S MIX    .R. 
                                CUL 
 
                W DS          . . 
                .4 .."":        .   U 
 
 
.  . .. 
 
 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
6 , 
 
 
PAS 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
WDS-MlX:": 
    PA 5 
 
 
    F~m P 
 
 
* *    . 
." .::... 
 
 
"-.CUL 
 
 
D S         " 
 
 
%_w 
 
 
° 
 
 
!1 
 
 
X 
 
 
C UL "MI 
 
*  R 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
. j:.M  IX 
 
 
il 
 
 
ii 
 
 
"C, CUL 
 
 
"4 
 
 
rt 
 
 
l 
 
 
L 
 
 
19R 
 
 
MIX - PAS 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IZ m ]- 
 
 
IMP 
 
" PAS 
 
 
] 
 
 
BM R . 
 
CUL 
 
 
BR 
 
 
M" MI "'x 
0° - o "R .I 
 
 
PAS 
 
 
 
yp"P 
 
 
I!M 
Il---f 
 
 
W OS- '-*" 
 
 
CfUL tC uj, 
 
 
PA S 
 
 
7 
 
  

					
				
				
 
JASPER 
 
 
COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 15 T7N. R.9E. 
 
 
".7BR 
 
 
BR 
 
 
I. 
 
 
".:':: W ': )  . 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
.1 
 
 
CU L 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CU L 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
*  ..-.. 
 
 
CU L 
 
 
i 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
I 
 
 
i 
 
 
BR 
 
 
8 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
N 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
JASPER 
 
 
COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 9 
 
 
T. 7 N. R.9E. 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
0r  . 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
[ 
 
 
rP RAS 
 
 
R CUL 
 
 
WD S- PAS 
 
 
MIX- PAS 
 
 
pA   O R 
  IMP 0.O 
 
 
PAS.1 IMPA 
 
   ""CUL "* 
 
   WDS 
 
 
W.WS 
 
W D 5 "":-.-.  ' 
 
 
.PA5 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
WOS 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
4U4 
 
 
PAS 
 
 
r             -                       - 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
pA   " 
 
 
         ...   CUL   IMP 
 
 
 
 
 MIX- PAS .          8 
          ABR-WDS 
 
    B.R... .. DS 
 
 
 
    "WDC 
 
  : . "         . '. 'CUL 
 
  "M IX- PAS                 . 
 
 
        C  CUL.CUL 
CUL 
 
 
* I 
44 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
B R 
 
 
RAS 
 
 
Wo S 
 
 
:BR-MIX 
 
 
WD 3 
 
 
 
 
 
WDS 
 
 
IBR 
 
 
PA S 
 
 
WDS.... IMP 
 
PAS 
 
 
WDS 
 
 
        W DS   "'       .:BR 
        -o", MIX- PA 5 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 IP 
 Cf   cc. 
                      C2. 
 
 
 
MIX -PAS,  . 
      BR                // 
 
        .'..: : B R : ... ,-- 
 
 
1/ 
 
 
S...... .---,.. ,-. . . . . .I 
 
 
9 
 
 
k,, 
 
 
t 
 
 
WDSý 
 
 
N 
 
 
w1--               * 
 
  

					
				
				
 
JASPER 
 
 
COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 10. T7 N. R.9E 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
B R 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
'V I, 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
--MiX 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
:1 
 
 
3. 
 
 
CU L 
 
 
.1, 
 
 
11 
.>;  
 
 
-B e 
 
 
I: 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
:MIX 
 
 
MIX 
 
 
I.t* 
 
 
Mly 
 
 
10 
 
 
--7 
 
 
S"B R 
",'. 
 
 
- - - i-. - - - 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
  

					
				
				
 
JASPER 
 
 
COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 4 T. 7 N. R. 9E 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
      MI X- PAS 
 
 
CUL  i    0 
         i~4 
  C U. L. 
  L   "" ° ": :"' 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
.J 
3  CUL 
U 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CU L 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
'i L' ' 
 
 
PAS 
 
 
   PA 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
.. t... 
 
         I. 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
   * -iV7 
 
 
 
 
/w.. 
 
 
I 
'I 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
-  adi.... 
 
 
CU L 
 
 
A        -  '--- -' 
 
 
.. " CUL 
" C.- ' . 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
wo- . 
 
 
PAS 
 
 
PAS 
BR 
 
 
CU L 
 
 
PAS  ". 
 
 
BR- PAS 
 
 
IMP 
II 
I, 
II 
II 
 
 
II 
I, 
1L 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
BR- 
PAS 
 
 
WDS 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL   ; 
 
 
 
 
 
."      CU 
 
 
   I   . C Uo 
 
 
       .wos-B , 
       ".BR  , 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
:WDS 
 
 
B 
 
 
MIX 
 
 
. CUL 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
BR- 
M IX. 
 
 
B B  - 
 
 
 
  CUL 
 
 
 
  C UL 
 
 
 
    "BR -I 
    .WoS 
 
 
           " BR 
 
 
 
 
0:        C: .6 ::;. . . . .... ' 
 
 
.CUL     . 
          WD5 
   UCUL L 
 
 
IMP1 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
PAS 5 
 
   DV..I 
 
 
CUL    CU L 
'" . i: ": .. . - 
 
 
I   MIX 
 
 
  WoS 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
W D"S 
 
 
I                I 
 
 
I         I 
 
 
I 
 
 
 t f b  
 
 
J l&        i 
 
 
II 
     iF 
 
 
n. 
 
 
IL 
 
 
S.. ...  ... .... L- 
 
 
,,----.q..,,---- 
 
 
. 0 
 
 
N 
 
 
11 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
JASPER 
 
 
COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 3   T7N. R.9E. 
 
 
- - -r:.;bTT:Th: W05 
   -             - - 
     ,. 
  24, / 
                     4: 
 
 
-'.CO % 
 
 
 
S-, ,fl ,- e . -  - 
 
    CUL CUL "UL 
 
 
W 0 S -.' 
 
 
R 
 
 
Ix 
 
 
-.              I 
 
 
wD.5 
 
 
WD 5-PAS 
 
 
o  .4 
 
-.* D 
 
 
- - 
 
 
C UL 
 
 
-/ 
 

	
				
 
JASPER COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 33 
 
 
C UL 
 
 
T8N. R,9E 
 
 
WDS 
 
 
BR. 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
  .I 
  .. 
  "/ 
:1 
I7 
/7 
 
 
t I * I 
 
 
.. t*  "-.. 
 
 
 
I  PAS 
 
 
D$ 
 
 
"ODS 
 
 
1*  GR 
 
 
BR 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
C UL 
 
 
U L I 
UL 
 
 
WDS 
 
 
PA S 
 
 
13A 
 
 
PA S 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
PA 5 
 
 
la 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
C UL 
  Sl 
 
 
:.. ..- ., :.-.:: .9, 
 
 
CU.L 
 
 
I 
 
 
WD 3 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
I 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
I 
 
  

					
				
				
 
JASPER 
 
 
COUNTY 
 
 
QUAIL 
 
 
AREA 
 
 
SEC. 34 T B N. R.9 E. 
 
 
WOS 
 
 
WD3 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
9 
 
 
U 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
7/ 
 
 
I 
 
 
NOT IN AREA 
 
 
WDs 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
.2 
 
 
WDS : 
 
 
N 
 
 
14 
 
 
*BR 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
CUL 
 
 
S....  .. .CUL ..... 
 
 
O 
 
 
0 
 
  

					
				
				
                                                                        i
 /   ,,>., 
                      ILLINOIS        UAiI 1  ~   ?~ 1;A 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
           Lan_._AZ4___2 41 15                                          
      "-47~ 
Sparce s * 8,0   .*2  6.9  100   +,i   1,6   8.3  1,2  IO,2   *5 7,4 4,6
 7,6 .1  76,7 
 
 
SDense WV* ,'3   .7   25    ,9    .0 ,      1,2   0,0          01 .1 1,5
.4 0,0 0.0 8.7 
 
R-avel *Tade ,0 1,9   .3   1*6   1*0    05   .9    .5   24     .4 1.5  #1
  #8 .6  10,2 
Dirt Fo&Acc lob  00  201   1*4    *9   1*3   0O    so    *0   2*1 1*0
 *9  1*1 .0  12 i"' 
 
r. I prmVt .r d1      .9    02   141    .0   .7    .0    .2    #0  .2  .0
  .4 .0   4.1 
Tralls     *7    .0   .4    00    Ob   102   104   *0    00    o4  #2  *0
 1*5 .0   6.*: 
 
R* ilrostda 1.1                                                         
           1,1 
Pave, ent 1, 1                                                          
           1. 1 
 
!rn*tro~ am* *0  00   1*4  2*4   2,6   o0    1,7  ....'s 1*4  03   #3 1*9
  *9  40 1402 
Dralimý-a D* #0  s0    *0   00    *0   Z[      0  2+4    00   1e1
 #9 '60  *0   00 7*2 
 
Riv0             0      0   .0    .0   ,C     .0   .0    .0   .0    0 20,0
.0 106  4,2 
 
 
                    * init ++tlesmr  +.J ..... [ttait  +t++ 
 
  

					
				
				
 
1 4ý Q11 IJ IL 
 
 
alo 10 or  t 
 
 
ierivel[os 
AIrt roz    7<20 
 
Ivor vod    4330 
 
 
 
 
Pave :rnt  5700 
 
Sparce P1~# 42390 
 
!/edium Ffl 17C40 
 
Dence F~*   5108 
 
int, t ream*  0 
 
Dramge~ V)*   0 
 
 
1021250 
   3 
 
 
 
   0 
 
   0 
 
   0 
 
43380 
17780 
 
1725 
 
   0 
 
   0 
 
   0 
 
 
   00 
 
   0 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13010 
 
7480 
  0 
 
  0 
 
 
I3 
 
 
  27 
 
 
  74)}0 
 
 
 
 
  0 
 
  0 
 
52910 
 
 
of12800 
  4S0 
 
  0 
  4o"-1 
 
 
4720 
 
 
I.00 
 
   0 
   0 
 
32340 
 
1140 
4400 
 
140 
 
   0 
 
 
El £70 
 
  0 
 
  00 
  0 
 
  0 
  3570 
 
 
 
 
 
  0 
 
14740 
 
 
t o n i 
 
 
 
    0 
 
    3740 
    7480 
 
    0 
 
    0 
 
  17270 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    0    21 
 
    o 
 
 
2C 90 
 
0 
 
0 
 
0 
 
0 
 
 
5610 
 
0 
 
 
2Z440 
 
 
M f1j r.wceV ow, 
 
 
: 890 
 
 
I 
 
 
  0~1 
I~1' 0 20A0 30Q0 
 
o 11330 50X0 
 
Iiio   0    800 
 
 
 
0      0    0 
 
0      0    0 
3520 12000 3¶.J.0 
 
S7,7503 10& 19920 
 
1l2O    5  7920 
 
7500  17e0  120 
 
0     6010) 5XC)0 
 
 
4840 
 
0 
 
0 
0 
 
0 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  10 
 
 
1 
 
 
4440 
 
 
 
 
 
ý.'12O 
  0 
  0 
 
  joi 
 
  79 
 
  o, 
 
  U 
 
 
   0 ,2110 
 
30r;0 7,0534 
   o 21340 
 
   o    31PQ, 
 
   o     5700 
   0     15700 
0 500 437420 
 
,0 0 15.7/C0 
   3 4    c A:IQ 
 
 
   o  15QJ50 
     J.   --j, 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
I tL 1 n o  QUAsL  (X7I  AL 
 
 
At  A 
 
 
y 
 
 
tlatqv 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fallowa 
Oft" 
3...1. 
-Imprvmw 
 
 
 
 
 
soho.,o# 
 
 
Z4 
 
 
 
5. r) 
 
 
10,4 
28. 
 
 
 
0.0 
 
 
7,4 
 
 
 
 
 
 
*3O 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2.* 
 
 
1.0 
 
 
%'i w, 
 
 
o 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
0.0 
 
 
  27 
 
42,0 
13.0 
 
 
 
 
 
.2* 
 
 
3,10 
 
 
7. Z5 
 
 
 
2.54 
 
.60 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
* 81 
 
1,24 
 
 
.ram 
 
 
1 
 
 
So ~ 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
z. 72 
 
O). 0 
 
 
3c. I 
 
 
 
1#1 * 
 
 
 
 
 
* 18 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
* 10 
 
* 
 
 
.0 
 
 
4A 
 
 
Per-,*n 
.ý I$Lo 13C ýLxzýId, 
 
 
        1~ 4 
 
 
 
 
 
 
.7I 4.03 5.14 a,Oi 441     14@I  8,.36 
 
1.44 .lfs .4 0.0  0,O  0.0   1.1y 
 
1.20 0.0  .&Z .9  .25 0.0  0, 78 
 
                            0,4 
 
 
                  .22  .660, L2 
              .11          Tr 
 
 
1. 9b 
 
1,34 
 
 
   141$ 
 
.5 . 
 
 
o00 
 
0.0 
 
 
1o54 
e. 
 
 
.47 18 
 
 
 
. W 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
ILLNL OII QAI L  9PFRIR  T A L 
 
 
ladi 
 
CtdIf~ 
 
  siw 
 
 
 
hruel 
 
U12d , 
  , ýO*L4 
 
 
  2$ 
 
321. 
 
 
 
 
 
70.2 
 
0,IJ 
 
  '4 
 
 
  27 
 
271.3 
 
1K. -1 
 
 
  21 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  47.7 
 
1)0.3 
 
1?, (1 
 
4;, 1 
 
 
  * 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
:21,4 
 
13. 
 
  S 
 
 
37.7 
 
 
'4 , 
 
 
,g/4, 3 
 
173 
 
7.1 
 
23.0 
 
  7.  
 
  0, 
 
 
#O, 4 
 
 
 
7, 6 
 
 
41 
 
20,2 
 
 
19.8 
 
 
  Sw       16.1  3. 
 
 
 
 
Totaols t4 4. t3. 
 
 
0 
 
0 
 
 
1 0 
 
5,0 
 
 
2. 0 
 
4,; 
 
 
11,  
 
  * 2 
 
 
t..0 1I) 
 
 
12. w 
 
 
13. 
 
2. I 
 
 
1a-.3 
 
 
,. 7 0i.0   74 7 
 
1.1. 
 
 
  67108 
 
 
34 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1.7 
 
 
1.2 
 
 
 
 
0.0 
 
 
 
2.3+ 
 
 
4 
 
 
 
'C , 
 
 
 
3 .2 
 
3,1 
 
 
  3 
 
1  
 
Li3, C 
 
 
 
3. 7 
 
 
 
). 2 
 
 
33X- 
311.I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
31.5 
 
 
0.0 
 
0,.0 
 
 
4$84.1 
 
 
 
1372.8 
 
$61.9 
 
 
 
042.0 
 
 
 
2. 1 
 
1* I 
 
 
I 
 
 
L-£Q 
 
 
mm 
 
 
+,,,+m 
 
 
GrMb 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
                E         tleopolb 
 Repriut1'd  from  1]iiioi,  .vwdeide   of  Sei(,ioe  T'r.  'to,  Vol. 34,
No. 2,  De(.,  1941. 
 
 
 
 
DISTRIBUTION OF UPLAND BIRDS IN ILLINOIS 
                       S. CHARLES KENDEIGt1 
               University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 
 
 
  According to the life-zone concept of 
Merriam and others, distribution of birds 
falls into natural units consisting of 
great trans-continental belts. Seven of 
these zones have been     described for 
North America, each bounded on the 
north and south by isotherms of tem- 
perature. With the recognition that dif- 
ferent species occurred in the west as 
compared with the east, certain zones 
were subdivided at about the 1000 merid- 
ian on the basis of differences in humid- 
ity and rainfall. If one follows this con- 
cept the state of Illinois falls mostly in 
the eastern Carolinian Faunal Area of 
the Upper Austral Zone. The Transition 
Zone enters the state on the north and 
the Lower Austral Zone on the south, 
but the extent of penetration appears to 
be a matter of personal judgment. Such 
a concept is unsatisfactory for analyzing 
the distribution of the three hundred or 
so species of birds that occur, as it pre- 
supposes a uniform occurrence of a dif- 
ferent group of species in each section of 
the state with their distributional bound- 
aries determined only by temperature. 
  Doubtlessly temperature does affect the 
distribution of birds. For instance the 
chuck-wills-widow, Carolina   chickadee, 
Bewick   wren, mockingbird, sycamore 
warbler, Kentucky warbler, hooded war- 
bler, summer tanager, Bachman's spar- 
row and others are found more commonly 
during the breeding season in the south- 
ern portions of the state, and the black- 
capped chickadee, swamp sparrow, bobo- 
link, clay-colored sparrow, and savannah 
sparrow are mostly confined to the north- 
ern portion. Very likely all species have 
limits of tolerance to extreme tempera- 
tures, but these limits vary widely be- 
tween species. When temperature con- 
trols distribution there is little agree- 
ment between different species in exact 
limits of distribution. Likewise correla- 
tion between distributional boundaries 
and isotherms does not prove that tem- 
perature is the controlling factor without 
supporting experimental evidence. For 
instance, the northward dispersal of the 
 
 
Bewick wren appears limited by competi- 
tion with the house wren, rather than by 
the direct influence of any physical en- 
vironmental factor. 
  In seeking units of significance for the 
analysis of distributional phenomena, it 
is best to utilize the organisms them- 
selves rather than any combination of 
environmental factors. Unless distribu- 
tion limits show some harmony and cor- 
relation, then  distributional units, as 
such, do not exist in nature. Actually, 
plants and animals do exhibit fundamen- 
tal distributional interrelations in the 
form of biotic communities. These com- 
munities give the most substantial basis 
for interpreting distribution. Exclusive 
of aquatic areas, two major communities 
or biomes are represented in Illinois: 
the forest and the prairie. Their occur- 
rence in the state is shown in fig. 1 which 
was prepared originally by the Illinois 
State Natural History     Survey'.  The 
limits of the constituent avian species are 
controlled by a complex of environmental 
conditions, in which moisture, light, and 
vegetation are especially important. 
    In addition to these climax communi- 
ties, there are numerous disturbed areas 
and subclimax or developmental com- 
munities. Most of the prairie has been 
destroyed for purposes of agriculture or 
has been greatly modified. Forests have 
been lumbered or grazing has been per- 
mitted so that they no longer repre- 
sent original conditions. Marshes, lakes, 
and rivers are subclimax, but if left alone, 
the smaller lakes and ponds will gradu- 
ally become choked with vegetation and 
transformed into communities similar to 
those now on the upland. Meanwhile 
they have a varied and characteristic 
bird fauna of ducks, grebes, coots, rails, 
gallinules, bitterns, herons, and several 
species of song birds. 
  From studies carried out in Trelease 
Woods at the University of Illinois, a 
typical list of species occurring in an up- 
land forest in approximate order of their 
abundance is as follows: indigo bunting, 
starling, red-eyed vireo, crested flycatch- 
 
 
'Telford, C. J., Bull. Ill. Sta. Nat. 11ist. Surv., 16, 1926: I-VI, 1-102.

 
  

					
				
				
 
  Fig. 1.-Map showing original distribution 
of forest (stippled areas) and prairie (clear 
areas) in Illinois. 
er, downy woodpecker, tufted titmouse, 
wood pewee, red-headed woodpecker,wood 
thrush, cardinal, yellow-throat, yellow- 
billed cuckoo, white-breasted nuthatch, 
barred owl, and Carolina wren. In addi- 
tion other species occur in irregular num- 
bers.  Total abundance of all species 
averages between two and three birds 
per acre (Twomey, Hyde, MS). 
  Extensive tracts of original prairie are 
difficult to find. Abandoned fields and 
railroad rights-of-way sometime resemble 
prairie both in appearance and composi- 
 
 
tion. Representative prairie species that 
both feed and nest in grassy habitats in- 
clude marsh hawk, ring-necked pheasant, 
prairie chicken, upland plover, horned 
lark, meadowlark, bobolink, dickcissel, 
and grasshopper sparrow. These are not 
listed in the order of their abundance. 
Total abundance of all species may lie 
between one and one and a half birds per 
acre2 which is considerably less than in 
the forest. In disturbed farmland, pas- 
tures, plowed ground, and crops, abund- 
ance may drop to one bird per two acres. 
  Greatest numbers of birds may be 
found in the forest-edge, or ecotone where 
forest and open field meet and interdigi- 
tate, for here there is a greater variety 
of habitats, and birds may take advan- 
tage of favorable features in more than 
one. Many of our towns and villages, or- 
chards, cemeteries, shrubby fields, and 
woodlots are essentially forest-edge habi- 
tats.  Abundance    commonly    averages 
three or more birds per acre and includes, 
in addition to some species listed for the 
forest and prairie, the sparrow hawk, bob- 
white, mourning-dove, flicker, red-headed 
woodpecker, kingbird, blue jay, house 
wren, catbird, brown thrasher, robin, 
bluebird,   English   sparrow,   bronzed 
grackle, Baltimore and orchard orioles, 
goldfinch, and field sparrow. 
  The presence of extensive forest-edges 
was characteristic of early Illinois. Birds 
were probably always numerous as a con- 
sequence, and except for the starling, 
English sparrow, and ring-necked pheas- 
ant, were probably of the species above 
enumerated. The present paper is in- 
tended merely to introduce the ecological 
approach to the study of bird distribu- 
tion in the state. There are needed many 
more intensive studies in all habitats to 
determine the occurrence of species, their 
actual abundance, fluctuations from year 
to year, interrelations for territory and 
food, nesting habits, rates of reproduc- 
tion and mortality, migration phenomena, 
and relations to man. 
 
 
2Forbes and Gross, Bull., Ill. Sta. Nat. Hist. Surv., 14, 1922, 187-218.

 
  

					
				
				
                                                      Illinois 
                                                      Wild Turkey 
 
 
 
 
Extract from *The Farmer's Attitude Towards Bird Protection" by 
Elmer R. Waters (Indiana Audubon Year Book, 1937) 
 
 
 
 
     "One of my earliest and most vivid recollections was of the 
day when everybody combined to slaughter the last immense flock of 
Wild Turkeys. They enticed so many tame Turkeys away and were so 
destructive to crops, that their extermination was decreed by the grange,

churches and general public. I am glad to remember that my father 
opposed it, however, he loaned his gun and went along and carried me. 
I cannot remember he was at all backward in eating the turkeys afterwards.

 
     "All that day the scattered flocks of Turkeys were gradually 
pushed into a large tract of woodland, nearly Willow Branch Church, 
in the Sangamon river bottom. A circle of men, women and children more 
than a mile in diameter, gradually closed in. Flint lock, and civil 
war musket, Kentucky rifles and other miscellaneous Junk, roared in 
competition with the fine guns of the town sportsmen and the professional

market hunters. The Turkeys milled around in that deadly contracting 
circle, without sense enough to fly out and were practically exterminated.

I remember one grand old gobbler, flying so high as to be out of range 
of shot that sailed a mile away to safety. 
 
     "I vividly remember my Joy and exultation on the roar of that wild

fusilade, and my sympathy for the slaughtered birds. I had no sympathy 
for the cowardly wolves, foxes and wild dogs, nor for the savage boare 
and sows who fought fiercely to the last and made things exceedingly 
lively for the hunters. Wagon loads of all sorts of game were hauled 
away and distributed. My parents commentated on the savage lust for 
slaughter in apparently kindly folks." 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
kMvn for )s~ett: 
     Dr. A. . Sohorge? has giveri v the fo1Iowin referenoe to a 
bo~k hi the ll!etorIC1 Librar whteh i~it be of e~at vThe to thoee 
~mb~rf of the noneeetion o orin prairie: 
 
 
         Gerid, ?, An I A. t 157. ,it of piats, 
 
     chorger tells e tht the list of   ýhnts le te bet lett 
of prairie vegetation -whih he uuows of 
 
 
 
 
  Otirtis 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Illinois Conservation, F, 
 
 
    c/vetdf/ei 
	
				
 
                       Fig. 3. 
persons who are hunting chiefly for coons. If coons 
are not caught by these hunters and trappers, it is 
because they are uncommon. In Lake County, where 
few general trappers take coons (fig. 1), those who 
operate in coon-possum country average almost three 
coons each. They do well because the little patches 
of timber still remaining furnish good hunting. 
Marion, Jefferson and Franklin counties on the other 
hand are very poor because their possum hunters 
and trappers take less than one coon each. Evi- 
dently the remaining woodland has been greatly de- 
pleted of coons. The poor coon hunting in these 
counties is particularly evident when their yields are 
compared with those of the high producing counties 
bordering them on the west (fig. 3). 
                [Continued on Page 8] 
 
 
        Some Early Trapping History 
 
   Steel traps were used by Virginia fur hunters as 
 early as 1709, at least 50 years earlier than their in- 
 troduction was recorded elsewhere in North America. 
   That is one of a score of interesting facts revealed 
 through  researches  conducted by National Park 
 Service wildlife specialists into the history of the 
 beaver in Virginia. Early manuscripts and other 
 obscure sources are being investigated for information 
 concerning the beginning, development and decline of 
 fur trading with special reference to the hunt for 
 beaver, America's largest   and  most industrious 
 rodent. 
   Captain John Smith traded small copper kettles 
 for piles of beaver skins worth $250 on the market of 
 his day, but a single pelt sold for $100 in the boom 
 of 1920, the study indicated. Virginia once had a 
 large share of the 60,000,000 beaver of the North 
 American continent but estimates of 1925 placed the 
 state's total at only 10. Protective laws, first enacted 
 in 1932, have aided in restoring the animal and sur- 
 veys this year show an increase to approximately 
 100.  Trapping   of beavers now    is unlawful in 
 Virginia. 
 Unsurpassed in the building of dams, beavers are 
 being planted throughout many western states to halt 
 soil erosion and river floods and to raise water tables. 
 When they enter an area other forms of wildlife, in- 
 cluding deer, ducks and muskrats, soon become 
 abundant. The Virginia Commission of Game and 
 Inland Fisheries is seeking to increase the state's 
 beaver population, according to Carl H. Nolting, 
 chairman, and is cooperating in researches of the 
 National Park Service. 
 Trade in the peltries of beaver, fox, otter, raccoon, 
 and muskrats was the sixth most important export 
 of the Colony before the Revolutionary War, accord- 
 ing to notes of Thomas Jefferson, and in early times 
 the exchange of furs was the most powerful stimulus 
 for travel between the backwoods and the settle- 
 ments. Intensive cultivation of creek bottoms for 
 production of tobacco infringed  so generally  on 
 beaver habitats that the animals suffered progres- 
 sively as new settlers entered the colony, researchers 
 point out. 
 Poorer Indians of Virginia used    deer skins for 
 clothing, but aristocrats among the red men chose 
 beaver pelts. Skins were worn throughout the winter 
 to receive a high gloss and in spring were sold to 
 white traders for use in making prized beaver hats 
 or castors. In 1632, a tribal village at Anacostia 
 traded 800 pounds of prime beaver furs to Henry 
 Fleet in one of the largest of the early transactions 
on record in the colony. Such a lot today might 
command prices as high as $10,000. 
 
 
4 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
    REFORESTATION PROBLEMS IN THE < 
               CENTRAL STATES 
               [Continued from Page 21 
ing to the purpose of his planting, and if he plants 
mixtures of two or more species, as is often advisable, 
he must know how to arrange them so that they may 
grow well together. Following the establishment of 
his plantation he must be able to give it whatever 
protection and subsequent treatment it may need to 
meet his objectives in growing an artificial forest. 
  Lack of essential information in any one of the 
many steps of a forest planting project may result in 
complete failure. The magnitude of the reforesta- 
tion program now being undertaken and its im- 
portance to the productivity and protection of mil- 
lions of acres of non-agricultural lands in this region 
emphasize the need for keeping pace with reforesta- 
tion research. Although every forestry agency, in- 
cluding this station, is making every possible effort 
to meet this critical situation with the resources now 
available, it is a fact that much more essential in- 
formation is urgently needed to assure successful re- 
forestation. 
   In this article an attempt has been made to men- 
 tion briefly the purpose and objectives of the Central 
 States Forest Experiment Station, in its effort to work 
 cooperatively with other forestry and conservation 
 agencies. The many problems encountered in re- 
 forestation, discussed in some detail because of their 
 present importance, are typical of those to be met 
 in all fields of forestry-forest regeneration, manage- 
 ment, protection and utilization. As is the case in 
 every great enterprise, whether it be undertaken by 
 private capital in industry or by conservation agen- 
 cies for the public good, research must keep pace 
 with practice and administration for successful ac- 
 complishment. 
 
 
 
 FARMER WINS BEER BY SHOOTING CROW 
   Mike Dady, a farmer, shot a banded crow last 
 week. The band was from the Hamm Brewing Co., 
 and stated it was worth a case of beer. Mr. Dady 
 sent in the band and was informed that he would re- 
 ceive his reward within a few days. They also in- 
 formed him that several hundred crows were banded 
 and   turned  loose last year by a Kansas beer 
 distributor. 
   This has been the first band of this kind that has 
 been reported in this vicinity, and with such a re- 
 ward, it should serve as an incentive to kill more 
 crows.-South Dakota Conservation Digest, July, 
 1937. 
 
 
  ILLINOIS TRAPPERS' AVERAGES REVEAL 
     COON AND POSSUM DISTRIBUTION 
               [Continued from Page 4] 
  Natural causes such as the exceedingly cold and 
snowy winter of 1935-36; the extraordinary flood fol- 
lowing the 1936-37 trapping season in southern Illi- 
nois; and the long period of unusual drouths are re- 
sponsible for part of the reduction of coons. Human 
activities such as pasturing and burning of woods, 
pasturing of creeks, cutting of den trees and perhaps 
excessive hunting are responsible in part. Pasturing 
and burning destroy berries and drive out small ani- 
mal food. Little can be done about the weather, but 
sportsmen's organizations, farm   communities and 
individual landowners can check further depletion by 
observing practices for good woodlot management 
and erosion control coupled with care of big hollow 
trees or a certain number of trees which give promise 
of later providing good dens. Such trees afford auto- 
matic protection to coons as well as possums. When 
a coon dens up during a chase, sportsmen and trap- 
pers should leave the tree standing and acknowledge 
defeat, taking satisfaction in the thought that this 
particular coon may furnish more sport some other 
night and, perchance, if he lives until the next breed- 
ing season there will be richer hunting the following 
autumn. 
 
    NOTE-The term "coon" rather than "raccoon" is used
in 
 this manuscript because it is convenient as shown by its gen- 
 eral use among hunters and trappers, because it is used by 
 Burroughs in literary works and by Leopold in a scientific 
 way. 
    The authors are quoted below: 
    "All hibernating creatures are out before April is past. 
 The coon, the chipmunk, the bear, the turtles, the frogs, the 
 snakes come forth beneath April skies." From "Spring Jot- 
 tings" in RIVERBY by John Burroughs. 
    "On the other hand, Stoddard believes that when a coon 
 or skunk finds a series of quail nests he develops the ability to 
 find more."-Leopold. Game Management, p. 243. 
 
 
                  WINDBREAKS 
 
   "Windbreaks for Illinois Farmsteads" is the title 
 of Circular 27 by J. E. Davis, Extension Forester of 
 the Illinois Natural History Survey, published in 
 April, 1937. The publication is a timely addition to 
 those on forestry and related subjects, with the pres- 
 ent widespread interest in both large and small scale 
 tree plantings. 
   The Circular is generously illustrated with photo- 
 graphs and with plans for yard and farm arrange- 
 ment and plantings. Planting of the Windbreaks, 
 the care of the trees and the rate of growth which 
 may be expected are phases of this important sub- 
 ject included in the publication. 
 
 
9 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
                                                      Pheasant folder 
                                                      Illinois folder 
 
 
    Fritz tells me a fanmer near Gladstone, Illinois, raised and released

 
up to 50 pheasants per year from 1900 to 1909. None of these releases 
 
ever Utook~u although there are now a few birds nearby. 
 
 
                                                       AL 6/1/36 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
-V 
 
 
*rapbti 
  bertt ion 
 
 
WORLD'S GE.ATEST NEWS 
 
 
Urribunt 
 
 
SPAPER 
 
 
APRIL 7. 1935 
 
 
Sraara ou'sit 
   *ott WO 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
 
 4 
 
 
,I \ 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
             fhs  IYr Ind t i       j 1'n 
tzi~,d to emp~iz,.':e tht Od prec icea :nd ot~rs ve tri.t 
to j)Qint tt  I*e pUr!Ci*tLe  as MtLiCouO.  o~ CliA the 
u~r~s are ue tex O  in eounUtar nuýbera whi    ot0 e-Ua.)  cr 
tLe birIs are  Uail tei ea    of and that the 1i01 s    :set 
lkativeiy mash.    ie~din  eo~nervationist hes aptly   p~e 
thie lilinola !ivert o Ua51a, for th~ere is so iOh eonfpcitn 
propa~nm thaCt On   is at a LOSa to kn   wat to believe. 
    £?he riter h~a sptent onsi~ra:ibe tim in the :hhirois 
    ci: ekntr eontactiuj olubs ~an cn eLi d~yoi4 
piaces okin a £tudy of their sehtin panicls, feed:bnZ an4 
bsitin of watrf.l sn< reletive &ab1ndhnce of ducko as eoioe~d 
with othr yeark in vn effort to 0ot s the feets anf ereent 
an unbised report of eonditions as they exist over the area as 
a w ole. oo often opin±ons have been toxr*~vd too h stily hased 
Qn e riencea ~at on l~e  wh- ih Ly b Ioo~ed Oil 50 tn 
by ths     zunr'1,   ootin' places yet the Itoie dIsrictd 
suiffir fxro' stories Of unports:am~i~e pr~etilee which iny not 
be at all general. Feedin and bai~ing of birds hea been tLe 
maost ;recent center of attack,  T?1ere are n.nct     obeen 
 
 
          e~~s~e Lua' 3be f' 5n-d 
oidtre on tihis subJect, much to be said for it aMd ehc tO 
                           t d ta ir in ~st Of the 
criltiem has i1  oLe free# these WilO lays tikenl S stand~ a~iXn8t 
baiting and feediz md liars for~ed thai:? einions froz stem lee 
whAe1h5 ve drifted back tO c     of tremndous f  cuurtere *Uc 
possible by bait in duo'ks into Loies but tty havs never 
octually obaerved eonditione and seen how the birds ork ever 
fed grounds. fore starting on thi' trip the riter vS 
ztron~ly op~osed to baitin{ of dveks aing hia op~irion uT~iy 
on esas~y as so       oti as have.   Ainee obaervin conditions 
arnd practeIes Le has been forces to chanue hie mind sowhat. 
    Let us tiuen consider the Illinois iver frots all of its 
angles which tiht hve a bsriry on waterfi conditions anid 
shoot ig practices. 
 
 
    n- e llinois river prior to 1C90 w7s in its rCuul stat. 
 etcrfowi usd it as their natural fl!iht line Vo the is- 
    is~ ~piand~ouh.  Lere were laige sr~ee anid bs waters~ 
anld pot holes for sever , tsiles bek* fx' ii t. eaini a:inel 
£ro~i halee to the :, sia.PsL i a dietarie of 2C iiiea. i 
of this bacV iater andi~ over~ fi land aboundled with riattrah 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
QeeU in the fols of weed seedn , wi"d rice, Celery, duok potato, 
poun weeds, duck weeds and wuraus other feeds &hINa woald at- 
tract du=s.   ý"e botLoms were *overed ait, rwtL     o"
pinok 
and pecanh vAl  excellent food for wattrfwl. Aith this 
abui n.ao natur I feed tkre ;as no need to -ut out coiu 
and otwr feeds to hold the birds. 
 
     Uis wais a period of spring shootln.     old tinera reported 
tCat the f.Ll li'ehr was not particularLy good aMd ticre was 
little shootin- then out the aprin flight was ve7 Levy anhd 
týAL w83 the t   W = 0nos of Ihe svooubi was done. Vhese 
were also Uhe days of tWE A ekw hýu&er bt whLle the Individudl

kills wer   - i~r;e tfL "umber of hA.Pere bs conpared pith today 
w4s cc yaratively usnil, 0Vhere was e0eell1n1 OhIL the 
way froV I Afe to the LissLssIpp      and accerdi   to the 0orta 
the birds were well distributed, 
 
     bout I=0 the draji  erA-I   bjf n to put in an nep n7Jrncee 
and continued until recen years. tarýe r aere ditc ad, land 
Was druinod and diked. mbh rood duck land was loat, th0 rAver 
was confliaA to a nurrower channeL, naturad feed was cFraduaiky 
reducd to prxctieally nothng end as they later found out 
little good farm land was obtaied, an=d floo1  s c00 ae Moe 
erokx  s &nd h avier, Shis drafnnEe and jditcinW  started the 
dying off of the fn  big piak and pecan trees and Vhe flood 
or M7 finished the 3ob. ?oV moat of the area is covrew 1!U_ 
tLe rotting spars which once supplied an abudance of duck feed. 
rhe attached nips uniowin the development of drinalge districte 
best illustrates the reduction of the wrounds suitable for 
waterfawl. 
 
     vow tie area suitable for waerfowl is confined to the dis- 
trict   tween Iue and  eridosia a dlstance of 140 iles, ich 
of which is not suitable for waterfol. Thus Vte birds are 
concentrated in . much smaller ares tian foreirly, and thek'e 
naturml foed supy has been reduce to practically notuin 
except at high Water wh en sn trt weed, saw n rass and nut gras 
are available in ood quJnaitles, The concentratiLn of birds, 
however, would Slu out tine natural feeid within a very short 
tie, not more tnun tWo weeks at the ve; outside, i      t    hU d 
to depend on this alone. o owhemr Ceolors lov entered into 
the Pieture, however, to povent the ducks frG     anffvrino fronl 
ower. one is the raiing of        rge quanictes of corn in tWe 
botto  were natur 4- feeds once grew wiWh 01plAses a feeahl 
,rcnd for tWe birds other t an Whe : ý ra     feeds. AMe ot1Ir 
is tie practice of feeMiY Aid baiting of ducks wal 1&     beena 
on the increase since igO0, vn4 is n1o n    er Mie fxi m    
conservationista, and w .iWh we will discuss in more detil 
L~te r. 
 
     ghe eri of dik4 and driirAI &   ia over teoporvrAly Nt least, 
tQe an Lt of upkeep C    been more 1Xtn te land will produce S  nd 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
the ta es haive been so high. that +un of tIe drAi~ge dlitriets 
      ~ ~        U oft+e Buitabie  at+eerfowl C 1Anl+ slot+ 
the river ýve ieen taken over by ýarIvkte  ltIub", C 0L1hr-C
I 
day shootixW plaoea and tarmer wh* have heid on to their land 
have turned it into ahoo'v; ,rouds eithr reaan       te ihoOtn 
rl~ts oa+ eh~rging on a 4 y fee baais. The waterfo4l greeids 
are   uh ýor va1ale than the su rondin      fani lend an  xre 
taed en ll     Vr hAn the beft tar nd     payin  a 11-llr 
Or taoe pet acre tw~es on lud      ch -u 3;C other vTlue tU  n 
for Waterrfo4, it is thru Lhese txes on the Tuek ahootin 
clubs that the sChool diCtrCLts are r ble to aurvIve,    vly- 
nt is given to   po     t    S r oOO x durint the season and 
probzlbly 1000 men the ye-r round.   Te clubs I rovi)e a ra(k 
for apprOzA"itely bQ0, O0          0i"ýl  of aar  0uh of
Whcih is of 
an inferior  uality and could not e r eted otherwise. 
ilfoli in the linis Valley is an iMIortant industIy 
upon which a (ood     eny peole   eend either wholly    r prtDilly 
for their wbiet1  oea Th    1 howeverI is not of SufiLcient 
importnce nor ho    we be so sC) rtsihted as to let it be an 
importat fsctor In influeeiný the t     ing of or continuin 
anyat      which might artafly reduce our waterfol  ly. 
            -Ielative      e of -erfol of 
 
     In  llecti  inforAtLion as to a dance of decs durintý 
 a gIven aesaon it is 1mossible to -e ann ccurate etiýto 
 of the mnabors of LUCks aarea Inch a. the tll      aA 
 ,Aver. There are too many biQds, and the population is eontantl, 
 hiting durin  the season. It wks al3.o iupossible for tie 
 writer to   pre the    aber of bird. with other yars as this 
 ws his first opportunity to    ae observtion    on the river 
 
 depend ou informa-ion picked up from CLubs, 1us rs    natives, 
 restaurant converautiont ani hunters who have    enl       the 
 river for sev l years.  t is BeLieved thr% this  ;tý) is 
 accrate when a sufficient number of people have been contaced 
 in any on. 4istzict. -ov y have uterior otive  in tryine 
 to re one beLieve there isan abundance of birds       t when 
 the consensus of oinio    is unanau    it is safe to say hre 
 is t a inrease, If there was a dffer e of oAiion then the 
 testimony ws eighed aocordini to the interests of the in- 
 vIdVul ad the writer forV    d his on opinion as tO tthe v ale 
 of the ntate~nta. This was the C-et1od foll ed th~out the 
 su;rývey, ad the ilnor-ation is  elieved to be   amur"te, 
     icr. DF kdtchell, o o  hof he nhe      ithell 
 3ros. ahoot Cubj, a day shootig place, bein    esirona of 
 nolip, hOW r       birds they 'vere feeding endueted a little 
 ,esearch of his oWn. ie found fr. ,    meros specimns tI t a 
 well fed duck would eat at any one tine an aVerae of from 60 
 to 70 :ru in of eorn. Then ae counted tie rainu of aheiled 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
4 
 
 
oc'n tO tWe bushel ond foAn= tL t it verae4 betoeen 70, Ov 
nd 30,bv trains to the bu~hel or a bushel of shelled corn 
CunServntively aill feed on the SVrre of IHOC bindsl tet 
us Mhen go a Little furtner and fiOXre the nuMr of birdA 
fed in the state of illlUnou 1rii- Uke season and the numer 
fed in any one any. 
	
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     'eportz from the ýxvan  daitrbat are agin uneni     nus t t 
birwd tre  oz2e nup1r'ut thn Leut too ts five ye;_w,    .&0in 
tW  npreiea this - ap~LS to i oInrr of their abuWdance i" the 
rial1ard, pi"wil, Aore Muebilsl un ri neer  but ewer baid- 
yeae  nn wid eon. GreenwIng teal have beex about th, sae for 
Uhe past sevewr l ye1sa. I h wlear lKk S lub estooite- n   a 
WirAs on the WC this )eVr ýs tie Kst 1hre seasons .ut 
woether. WCe lane reporta 0or. bWlldate 'I- wlgeon t0 n 
inat year but the awea as a whole Se. s to he &cort OT t in, 
'no4dsuoku are repocted Msnct quite "o ahnWant. 
 
        Thest sonl tine reports hAve ,e t Arom ohe hErEC' dis- 
tlrct ut tk nortk end of the river.  "POently   oere :ere 
,ore birda at the beginuing of the seawon than last year but 
t e    bex laer on nos off. It is  crcn.rly Ccnoewim Vt; 
the malads w~re wore mx rona but taWkin t.he season as a 
wole the  Wbn.r or birds ar(A-und woxn Juct about equal ist 
year which soe report ,     the be=t in the pst ten years. 
Oodduoka were reporte, at wOre waVertn., Phe    rliter beieves 
fro  the reports -t.V in is sae so any that mallard are aore 
numrous than last year aqn Ant oprig,, arid both teol are 
abt the    we a  last year. ipparen~ly bluebills werv eort 
0oot have nOt bee US a!ndant s last Yar. 
 
    Taking the territory aa W whale 1o2tinv -as excellent up 
until about Koveuber Lb. FLroa hý.t tim  o" ther was prrtilc
1ly 
ao   cotin.  Ohe birs were f edMn; aý niht and rittinp in 
the open water1 uin  tie dsy. Phe reUo  for ;wzth iQ attribut d 
to the ull noon so that it A. Litt enoug. for the birds to 
see to fted at nigrhb This eplarnation may be true or it tay 
also be tlat the birdi are eMh ing tWeir habits swomnt as 
a result of the constant uLootinCr. The field pens wit a few 
enceptions have had little or no shootin   this cwn as wr    t x 
o'itions Pave not beon Avowrie to the birds woing into 
the fields 4urin the day. 
 
    Another concentration point in ll1inois for ducks and geese 
WLcI in lmei    of inwreasin iortanoe is  orseshoe L~ e near 
0aNo In the extreme aouthern part of tIe *ite, The lace iL 
in the Lh e of a hor. e ehuOv awd the i  alad in the cwnter of 
it kas bLen naade into ; refLe Sy the stat*. Tis island is 
abot 00 au.c, n4 n 1w   ned to wheat and grans to aft rat 
and hola ygese. it is eWiated tt there ar. Dotween 1  ,00A 
1"a 4O,oC Ceee cIeonctrated at thiQ spot and the nuber      i 
incre~ainL every yeIr. They are all Usnade geese. The outside 
of the l1.e i nurnunded by farwo w ich Lave been wrned into 
da   hootina pLaces.  bout 4000 geese will be Kiii'd here 
  "a aeexi. .iuero re aup itely eig:teen ahoutin, ince- 
arouad the outsine of the Lka. Waks are  leo  uncentx'ated 
in t,01 dintrict. The writer *aw a pny birds here a5 at 
4ny one sapot on thu 1l0lnoi iver. ne u0ornin0 t:e vnitr 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
6 
 
 
wa~.che4 a ste~ady fl1l1.t of birds coi~dn frorm The Lissimseppi 
  W    &der to iorseioe Lake from 8 A * to il:LC .V,  The bird. 
  were t2.yin hl eano Th flight was o/ontinuous in flocks of 
  'r m 25 to 1 0 or miore bir ds tind in to f yw . T he 8u ~s wen t 
  pr1i6" LaUy miardn, 
 
     it is eLtwied thit the e tre mre cucks AI tvee t.an 
     latyear so* even go in no far as to s~y twioc an ny but 
 that ia undoubtediy a Ulttle atrori, 
     L   ]arjst f     on the lake score ecmists of 
 has eleven goose pens and one duck peni and gill kitl th is year 
 batween QC and 0 eese. 
 
     The~ ahootixW 81orng te i1hioie  iver ixy be divided into 
 ft~r generaI. classes nane]y, river e otinj, ursh shootirng, 
 tlimbr ihole shooting and field pen sheetrly. 
     IThe river shooting is done u)stiy by coercj~l day shooting 
 elubs of The poorer rad auc in not extensive oi usunU y very 
 productive aItho at tims good bees are made. The ethod of 
 *hootin is thnlt genermlly used along rivers exce~t th t corn 
 Is u,.4 to bait the groun ai4 water in front of ti e Blind. 
 tive decoys p to t~entyfive bt~t usunity aroun fifteen axO 
 few wooden bloc&k. are placed in front of & wIillc  or bruh 
 blind or son~tjjs where there is timber Qlon th e bsan no 
 blin i. ne~eded. The Uive birds are kept thruot the seas~on 
 in wire enelosmree on the bak by the blind.   hnm    sotr 
 re uain the blin the birds are strung OUt in the usual 
 fashion, The b&ans and shallow rater are b-aited da ily w ith 
 corn either eariy £ the mounln, at noon or in the evening 
 depending on ;hie individual place. The hirds ce in to feed 
 in large nuers eairly iz the iknruiA nd Li the evenirg. 
 Aing the day &nr~4ea, doutble maybe a doen bids y e~e 
 in at a time bit meo bij flos are attracted. pparetly 
 4urin the day it ii the live blirds an a duo1 call tkiat usually 
 brins the birds within shooting e  i~ot the feed as is 
 generally aup~ose to be the ease,  Early in t ;orning arid 
 in the ewning the bireds are undoubtedly attrae ted by the f;ed 
    Zeeding is usuall  started about two weeks before the ;e son 
opens to get the birde aeeutoa#e4 to using, a particular place 
to teed. iost of the birds are shot eomxin into the deco~ys 
altho they are lso potted on the water when opportunity offern. 
The river shooeting pi ces usually tea~e fu~ll a~vant~ge of th~e 
entire. liootin time fro haf hour before sunrise to sunset. 
3ou of the larger pl aes have rest days but the aority sihoot 
wheoever they hdYve untors. mhare is some late ehooting along 
the ivr   nd some abuses of taking riore than the ba lirait 
whlen tJ in is possible aitho these abuses arti a cjuentiori of Thw 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
¶7 
 
 
enforce-ont rather than any thing Mhieh mi~ht be ascribed to 
 
   baitt D4 
     it is the gnerai praottce to a~n  puwler out with~ eacr 
 purty and usally two 0n "to Eo a bind. The pusVer outs out 
 the decoys, usen a dum< call to asist in brinying the birds 
 in an h elps to shoot the birds for the party unlen twsy 
 specify tnat they desire to do a01 of theiV own ahootin which 
 few do. The kaurr, however, by ztte law is vrohibited from 
 tmkinr a Uiit for hWself, in other words tao ron and a pusýer 
 are entitled to brin, in oely twenty-fcor birds ad not thirty- 
 s ix, 
 
    Lmrsh SiAUinn in tie met i0  ortan casys of Shootin! Olong 
 the river. Pont of the club shootiln   an  he larger day  hootin 
 plces are nr%~rh shooting, 
 
    TA  syte   of shootin in tue mrm ec is to have a pen eon- 
 structed of wire, ciroular In shpe m asdabu&t 15' to 2Q0 in 
 dameter.   meaty-flve live bir decoyA are plAed in tief 
 pens in front of the blind at th beWirmin of the season vxd 
 left t*re thnout the sean.o Tne birds are fed in tnese 
 peul aiid adltlonal quenities of grain are seattered on the 
 bank ad in the s  Low water around the blind. This feewd is 
 put out either In the rninQV irounw seven o'elock, about noon 
 or in the evening, usuPlly, hvever they start in the mrnin- 
 and finish up by noon or shortly after. 
 
    "oat of the shootin in doe in -nral holes erented by 
scooping out a  isll shilow hole or by p;utti in a siall dao 
to create   Mater hole by purinjn or on open sleuths.   7Ae beat 
shootiLg iW on the larger open sloughs. IOae of the larger 
bodieS of open water such as Cjrne Lake ad Clear Lake are set 
eside as reoting ground for the birds, avd not mlot. 
 
    ,le writer toas hear r ny n tores of the elaborate bOin 
tsed i thiC dlstrict,  4ltho .ooe of tie latrest clubs were 
virited te wriAter failed to see any elaborate, heated blinds, 
1ot of the bSinma were ordinar villiv, brvus and gass blinds, 
In the mar er Wlou     Ae a blinds is sotemW  - aU d iA thO witer 
but &ener.±ly tkey sre on tae soi5der around, Jee are fr1m 
on to three or four VMSnds to a pen of dicy;.     it  ra 
ml ler   useCS th. are usually wO so that the Whtex my 
Ajust kis poeStion 1t00r to te wind. 
 
    :me clubs uCualy have a   e r o ot with t:u R 1r . 
host oF the birds arz hot ol the win  Itho V ere ain t ey 
nire motine" peonted on tA! water, T    Ahe  oCMreiai shootin 
jlaces end ou t pus-  r wit the shooter,. The puther 
uCUally a   ;t with a duck call and il el  to shoot the bLi01. 
Altho  C is not Allowed to wet a l. iit for hi eIf.   2hK 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
  YU~t1In S07i V IL~ anon imiicýe    Z     I~, si Woerre    to w 
Cotivl  firin. The nu posu of t 6i is 1 a   onservation a" ut,..e 
ALtr t aonL a lenis Lo 0lait}    . r  Ao t or .hE shooters W* u  i-e 
down have  Ld little duck shootin   e   egeWuce an" ao not Now 
when a duoniW elone enouti to shoot at, They shoot then twe 
blAM  a, SIL wazl o0t of raqFe conseWuentLy wounding onniader- 
sble bers of bi1x s and aiso burning out a Cole in a veay 
1 ont tii.     ýhus it iA ioe     .1sirie;. not  o WLoot until the

0     oa  wishin ran, 0 We clubs do not permit shooting into 
big flock of btAds and neithor ao te bea.  e0 class of con-ercal 
day ahoooln. ;       :p.en a :aan ioes to a blind at thi bette 
eoareal places he is iCstructed not :o shoot ito the bi.dS 
as they Eet up fro.V toe water wen    a goes into the blUn"s 
and not to shoot into large f'loes. nome o  the snIle,   coo- 
MrciP l pl- es C lW  cno restrictiouns but because of U at fact 
tQeir holn. are oon burned out and they find thenfeIve5 mitt 
very poor shootin ofer t'e first few days of the seaa
	
				
 
 
 
 
9 
 
 
4he b, Lo  anw  in t%. water.  "a'I i 0 the day, hoAever  LO Meows 
;,1e     U aMd y&e it not the opori tunity to ýnhe tLe big 
lAut Lips which are attributed to f04in.      '.Urlnc the day 
V0.  Of the birds are rafted up oU CWane LVhe0 Cler 1ake aW " 
other 1ýFer rewtim grounns. About foi  r o'doV k tC I birds 
beAIi Lo Pove, They get up i bitA 11CAs    n!d literally pour 
into tL. :arsh 0oi an itee on 'hc coarL    IVer e is a"othVr 
tiAW   n tn e Us otE r M aC v n oP  o ;artnly to mintKe 'r;ef ;o 
hisha by pot tiOn duann and a few outLaw pknoeu t1ke ad- 
vante o1A it.  W"e aty  aornid anS eveviu 0 eoncentriokns 
Lmy be attributed entirely to the pxactice of feediry. Duxni 
the day i it  .  e wrL U..ltn&" Sieer thEAF"tjed  lys a AOcd

in dvwinv t0. birds into a given hoLe. Thy aýu 
arseted by thii ecoys anU duen call. The birds aeI over vhe 
buiVed gounds du~ine the day Just as they would if tr W* 
  no~ibut, ae   ti~ re and L  sho tiug Po just a spor~ty. 
Potting, the bird in the earSy V ninj "hen they aire fei 
and in Whe wvenin, iC not sporty sLoti4 but a     vCcoous 1ractiOe 
whioL shoui be wiped out. The yuubev of places     cre !ti i.u type 
ok shootiny taaso  place is in the miuori y,   rtunately. 
    For he L a part v he  a~rh shoo~n is p et~y aell :tun 
because I& Ls O& uthne      to in  e t %'t it is nt  shot txo 
heavily ot0rWise the birds wiUL stop usinv tuc' hols. 
    Ybhe woo4 s 0 uL  ubtelly uauniaL Wh e Ln o puXlo  PhooinE. 
nese ConSinu ;, lnmaL" up zivk. U. =is i. whieh wa-er uýs 
bUen yuaed, tural pot h0oles ad sCOOpe,, 4     i Uar holes 
whihn have Utn jumped full of water* Live uecoys up to tenty- 
five are placed in a hole and corn is scattered ar".ouh tVe ban 
an  in tie all0 W anoer tO v Whe birds aeusuoned to UsxiQ 
tuese noles. whe bird.s uein  these hos are prloticilly Q! 
niards ana reset to tht feed about tLne sa      as in the fyxr Oas 
a   On Ithe river. Maey C o1  in in bLi  Noos to fLed eau4Y in 
te mnrniui and in L;e evn  nd dribble iA a1l thxV the day 
in s4i   flaocs exepAinc on stora    d;ays wisn tney  cee  t th woods 
Aoles for added shrelter.  Thise nob.   ave either a bMod blind 
or 11 biind at nil 4:he soooter sn4Aiu    .1vn   a tree.   W.e 
birds are shot as t.wey , ox  in over c  e trae, a w.is .r..vide 
exOnilera shoOU  .  1hootiu in Ahese   LOW!s ueuaiy doe4 nSot 
sarýt bifore eig2t in he io q      0n &  1 by four in tk. AIfter-

noon except oard ;h: end of t sesn wen v         tY L-dit 
sre such thaL tVe birds do not wor&       on the   y s' OO later, 
hiwi type of sahootiL is doie bon  tSy pyrivae end eooinicial 
day shooting eiubs. 
 
    0et us now Lucu te tns fourth Wo last type oU oo;:4' L 4. t 
 of field penu  hotoinc.   is type of 2ostLný LCa e"    i1L fon

 vore eiricieiSl aud is ar    b les" uwdars3o- K     by . h . )n 
 t. an any o0* r' tye     v £MIA P enn 'na oe    a1 0Co AI  ,Ited pvty
7ll 
 in the a sain i; 1eton , f iu   1 1 end ;"edýeL 4  ties.  :n
i 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
10 
 
 
1filpit over Lay' a part of 2~azwiil ZounidLes Uhier or Vhe 
are jut in by s~J. pviw~te clbs by fatrx wio i~ase t. I 
pena by the ae~on or taTke in day     .......2Iby        o~V~1 
olin use, and4 by individinsis who 1:ave gone into the bh~nix as 
thLc4" p~irymJ Teanr of ilveliAhood. 
     T i1d pen ia a  e or     loc~sure of tire Vro Venty to 
t~iit{ ydar ix. diamter plced in ti  iddJe of fiI& o on 
   Shltop 14 to shou~t thr~ee niile froi te ~ia 2uZX',oufded 
with~ rxzri Lwo to five cornaloc btilnL,. ive birds up to twenrty- 
Live re placed in t'e- 2en a the~ be~in.n of thie seen n 
   e t 4e~ utaltl t~e end of t~e season, b'au&y & sxailow 
pond i seoe ouit in the pen and k~pt full of water by ut~pin. 
sa~er bttcr,      f'CW 01 the pens a~ entreiy dry but tt onea 
iith 1' ponx er    or*e ees~fui.   T ese h~oles are baxited 
heavily.   Co   is      s. e 'un       on s  nd ofteni lcft 
in piUA3. Dn 01 8 iLl above Cleair )k is fei s rich e~s 
good.   i p frtiCUiar p(7n is o at  iy 
    TVhe bir:s tre in t1e pensG feedin4 in hlarge umLeri ea1°I 
in .h oiing an, in the evening bout fou' o'Clook they et 
up fron tdc open :tr end liter~ily awair into the field pona 
to f~e r~n  t t Asa tW. tirces theore is an aoipotuni~y to  e 
hit. 2iagtrz by ?ottifl!   the bir'd o1 the groxid.  DX Ir4 tie 
dty xce)t in storrmy  tber WhejA the bixds move b&k into t;e 
  fl ld a ri they Co~ie in Th air~lea up to LUybe ! o  :n bi d 
n rc~t of t ke h0otiI4 is on the wirn;, ltho B0~e~ of the 
pleaces inue to pot the birds on tke ground, The better 
   a of pi~ec >'o not start sL~ootln( before ei4t and  
by four, Uzformtuxaty t~e re aa~e a nuioax of. thu Lln~3 oPti 
fLild pc1 w e~~e tsy  tave ao se oupLe i,a shoo. b~fue oj~znl 
d4 they nit feeoifl in L~rge f~ocku, i lrge u~xber of~ 
plhcoc r the e ve of e~e oing in the a~pxaceiui uanes 
   kit harvd for t~he wirdeun o enforce tx'C ia. I1. wi~er 
Xea d one flied pen ect  ooe ino& &o         br~ap~nIy 
f~eed~in , it n  i. ~tie t three in t~e trnin on a oon- 
1igh night. 
    The field penu biindv are re elaborate th ci~e u~ed 
in o ce~e for tie ot er types of sheerly., e nre 
u~au :lly d~e of wood and covered with cOrnshoc~a rd a:e worn 
an4 oofrtbe         ew t~re e ~nected with buzezer to In]ic~4e 
w~e  t esooter is to      riia~*nce firing but %uaualy tie pu  exr 
    iIs rof ovti.   2 :in is a rood pract~i~ :eoe .e it 
ztat'tig to sOL( ot before theu birds Ii: close enough 
enli   w  1! oi! l r v uher of  hirds.   few of  the  pn  u~e fllen°

 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
II 
 
 
decoys to Snist in drawlng the bMrdo into ta  e deceyY.   A 
iY done by ývLW ý h11f .ozen b.;: W xose ý? 4cEt bWeeL

wii, lu a driairt g tý7  itnto a b06  in t. pa er's bC I n" 2
ýeI 
q an Ut blrds a oiterit but -rz koz "ri~         wazl. t4,. 
guy er t 1rom  tik fiers Into tn e Q . in owlp; W1e,1  sin Z    the 
i t bb>U uc Fa       t. e tt- e  toL V  ywgpproceed to ne f o0 e1iit.

it iU a vc:: cffective ucLod of brC 01   bi:x Lill  ii not In 
vny ge"r .i,e    ý  of yet. 
 
 
 
by tKe yuter ci..    ýh;otin  plaee0. i few I prluFItMn 
st~riete: r'enfo4vnt 0i ri dmbtt~dly reduce the~se to S .I i~iM. 
wield Phoot!in  is "At in 1torUN  wean  V .. and a.fter  T , 
 
    ttat NO Qt c;.,&ý lEelih;  av O   t -zk :1  a-    t  0-l 
ruppen if feu !    erL ý tCp.u 0ntirel? T' -n.! Ulf        of 
the q " f;ione tit  r   trio n.o fin W1 3  aYswkr to. ; 
 
 
w0 Aone. T fledin An" ua iL  Q2ly t2Ii o;Vir teor 0 tr. 
 
tLcy Wouni ot"er~is4 stoy in ti    teLtrritoa y because 3n2i  1 
oenU    1ivai  (8 bUý d4  wýiJ =on cl.lan a,, *m~t n0ttu11
 feeN 
We re ib axn We bips would move on south. It in clsid thAt 
6te birdz would go straisht twhlu and would not atay nore tZ n 
a see& on wo if t iy aoro nou fad.   Tere i, h1w3,    , a,  tle 
to suttuanuite    W plonto   Undauuteliy  w! ....  noK 
in as  xg zuor  ut they u o00d  Ltay around in nu1bers 
suffici  6i sueppy  ood Whotiail.  fJ te fed nere PIt 
taere th would turn to the corn fiet;  as ý  hey do OItar zhe 
                 fof Zhe places now iaving ,oo4 shooting 
would, aowevea, get "o Whootlnp wlit~out feedirs bacmuie t 
dirda o   noN a t r13lly u~c the  :w AMe field -cn - I.ould 
10L no shooti to epeak of.    it t~v fedin!   : n   toN-e,  a 
large ýr:et foe tW  local voin crop Au l    e e.iMnKI  ted, ;nop 
a ae from nhe birds eovink Wo the f ieds WouCd       e hiAh, 
MY eUbS wolad Wi~band t4oig MA n" out uf Vor':, thj     bifd 
w60ld We Loze 1ctera t       od U oAlz Lot be so well rot-ate  4n 
tLe Motl .il.eda wo.ol be m, largei t.ýr .t  . r . 
LOLt Syatea, ; .s ,1.1JA not Ae   e   ap 0d th   e, o   1 y wou N! 
".e hAd Xii Ic: i ally.    he f0eA to be oSnder0    A0t 
troz1ly thQ in the fOct L;t ýore hirJe woTld UW  nd Wbte 1y I, 
blUghtered if the - aiuW   were not     , for in aite of 1Br>e 
of the. eiriti1.em of the lu'bc they p.oteot the biri~, lheve  
sbliler number of shooters and 010o0t  &Bwer  yu Q=n would be 
the Cese if th L,  v1! ;e up the l rd. .not.er thiniw tn 'n- 
sider is thet t'e bL.h5 leav   th5 riyer ko n"e hetter e.n ilon 
thn they coar% in UnE '. in b< t cr ?t e to sifT for them- 
ZeCvos thr0 th! tInter in TAE LOutY.   jt , eesy no tell the 
birds %  ha0 v  Jusi ao, '  In fVo- tholý  gic ha ave been AzKr,:

for n-1 time'.  2!i-S juoq. coans   in eW r  thin ahJ i ht bq Yvi 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
    bee  u~nd oaziou ti* e ft~i an-d in wond ~rftil eondition 
  sa ieault ofZ he o~n          ZidA cn irds does ror goo than h:ry so 
   h~lnot teiii~ated but it doe need ,oiere !Wltton wfhieh 
#ill ;end to reduce h    aobile abse    of the  rcie 
    it ±5ifl in~ je~   o LOQe tdt one5 or tWO clubsa Y3ent tne 
rive*r pe~ruit onty d~ole b:raele shotgu~ns ¼o be used. 
 
 
      £ofa tiitre ave been. t'O ethods uese       enoneidered 
feo" Lna~tin the bnItin ad feedlii: probleua -- one to stop it 
altogether, the htirtor            tntiia~et rr,>e. the f~ed 
one may no     2he objection to t1e i::t h~ve Ire~dy been 
1;&ted. Qcnsideited theoe iceiliy the second :olhtion sounds 
logicl 1iut when one cosidiers P.. frc t ay t:< biixds act 
it woui aecwis.P   little, i~he prinCIp~l    vj,o:c of feed is 
to hoid the iir wL~hu ee t~.n are&~s an to lt the to use 
cerain hoii~eh Jiether Orx u,t thit feed a nec in rot o 
 
illy li~~t nle- the decoys regi41  of wher+ the  ~in is 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
and t-en start feeding. It Tiight prevent the concentrationl 
of feeding birds right in front of the blinds early in the 
xrrniZL end in the evening but *he man who pots t1be birds &e 
they feed thus vuýYJne big sl.aughters is the outlaw who would 
MVe nc scM0ples about sneaking up and ýhooting where the 
feed was put down.  uc"h a reUlfition would mke little or no 
dJiference to the large club ,hih h, d siffoent water u crea 
to pert.it feeding 100 yds. flro- the blind but it would 7or! a 
hardship on the little reilow wa has perhaps only  forty 
with one sall hole where it is physcally itpossible to feed 
i0C yds. fro0 the blind. Such a rulin  would be in. favo of 
the ieajthy shootcr end against the  i1 of small means who 
could not belonc to the aere club,  In addition auDh a rei- 
lation would not be xforeble for if the feed were dropped 
in the water it would be alrst i~ossible to check up. 1h- 
writer wouId consider such legat lateon ,  as unfair and not 
practieal of~ enforcement. 
 
    After watclhng the way the birds work to the feed through- 
out the day tihe iost satisfactozy regulation seems obvious. 
The birds feed early in the iiorning in large numbers and go 
to the rest  icunds shortly after sunrise, during the day they 
wor  but in small flocks so that large kills are not pos ible 
about   four In the afternoon the birds get up from the rest 
oUUUa-,n3nd swarm in to the feed making 4zaost unluiýted kills 
pomsible.  It is fairly dar, at half huxr before sunrise and 
a potter cn sak in and cut loose with an. autoi-Atio into the 
feeding birds before opening time and sneak away in the half 
lht without the warden being able to locate hit". The ;S 
thing is tr-ue after sunset. otters nay and d1o enek in and 
pot feeding birds and  et away under cover of 6 nfss.   an y 
birda are also lost by shooting up to sunset because of the 
dar1ners. The writer therefore suests that the shooting 
time for the country as a whole be shifted to from sunrise 
until four o'clock.  Jlueh a rline would be enforeable be- 
cause there is sufficient ligh  t each end of the day to 
permit the warden to detect and follow violaters. it will 
overce   the opportunities for the abuses whiV  h arise fArom 
iaiting of poattv larg   number of birds as they fed. The 
early closing time should also be of advantage in the areas 
where feedInc is nt done for as it is how the bird are 
continually burned into ar -hey come into the open marshes 
and when they are burned into at nitt the tendency is for 
the birds to turn and ,ive to feedin grounds further south, 
."he writer believe' that this eairly closing tlme wold result 
in better shootin in the north in the open -ýrshe and the 
birds would stay around loner. 
 
     In event there is too strenuous ob.ection to fixing the 
 above sh.otin time fo-rý the country c- a whle the tIii might 
 well be eit for o reas where a rtin  is the aeneral pr:ctice 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
14 
 
 
only, zauh as the 7llinois River Valley andi tihe 2rie arshes. 
In this Case tc e opening ti  !iWht better be i"ioved up to 
Seven o'ClOloI. LAUch a regulation will eet with- the gerai 
app rov,;o   of the ju'i vte cl   n  the coii4er ial day sho1t in 
Daoes. Tile better place alreedy preatia, even   orter shoot- 
ing ixourt and I. ould give 6n o4ortunlity  o get at the out- 
iaw. Lualh a law would be enforceable, and aor   oplish the 
pur)po of meeting the obJeetions to biting and feedin- to 
a large ;easure fa_ would met with th eo-)-eratlon of those 
 
    A regulation which un have sug~t~d is a zglntion to 
prohibit pottin birds on the grond. Lils would be   c good 
thing if it could be enforced but the enforcement would be 
difficult and no zreulation is hotter than unenforceable 
reg'uat ion, 
    Lihere is need f~or coopei~tion beL cen the state arnd ff~dersl 
off iers. Tae writer Under ten a that 4he Diireotor 7ve or1ers 
for the state men to stay a~ rri iOfe    ul' enbc~ 
Creecih wOUld not ap'oint t;he 'eputaes tie ireetor wýated but 
appointed aoii en wron Thompson oppesed. The state w~ardens 
vre inometent for the moot part and apparently pI   y little 
attention lto waterto~l vlitiont for the   t pert. :a lon 
a5 8UCh conditions exist it will be herd to et any re1Clation 
enforced and  heCre will be a lare number of vIolatilo1. 
    aumra seea to be prevalent of trapping but no con seeou 
to be able to put his finer on it. 
 
 
    tallarJ, p1ot uis r ~win neal and wooddUea are more 
nuerua then last year as re t1~e bluewirig teal *lthe there 
was practically no shooting on the latter beceuse of th~e laee 
open season. 
    In spite of th)e Larg haber of birds around the shooting 
aas not been particularly eO~d bec~use of the weather eondit~ns 
and the thot that t1 birds have been wor~ings mol:e at ni~ht 
du'ing the fNl. of the moon, Shootin has been particularly 
poor in the field pens and kills have been :relativeiy smII. 
    iaterfocling is en iw~ort~ant ooonoimte faeto~r in the Illin~ois 
Valley from A~~to heri~4sis eu~iying soe Z.C4 or mre eien, 
affording a r:aret for about 00,O00 buo eta of coin much of 
w~ich is a poorer grade. About a quarter of t la a:mint is 
raised by the clubs on Pei  onproperty.   Xe club property 
taxes maintain t1e school districts, to a large extent. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
                                                15 
 
    AperoXiv-ely  413,00C birdW are fed pe* day duriný the 
s7ason an omly about IZ% of thn nutcr fed in on. day 0   re 
killed. 
    Ahootinr pretioes are with a few eocetion     goS, shoot .n. 
does not 6  L befree eit ai a-OPat tour or eartA  er  Oand 
1ar:e flocks ire not shot into aL th    better privaite  4   omýr-

eaIL clubs. 2ihere ave n     'rou7 "Aujes by sm-di outlaw5 pao es, 
and poac"ehy. NighE shtotix    and pottinP is prevalent in soYe 
of 1: fiWd "    i e, a tho tae nu0 0r i4Uj sv nJaw . 
 
    Auzanof 01 i SMA i"%jy A  t.t6g05d O  ' n   Macl~ tLhe Shoot in

time fron saven to four in fea ar oi 0-un rieo to four for the 
cuu~try 3j a Whole. 
 
   0o0   cao z&:rion bets  en UL     nd federal ofMfcers And 
strIcte, law enforcement is nueeesta4  . 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
16 
 
 
    In addition to L r    Pru  r pus er71 f r0e , and  , LIve, t  , -eI 
 
Ait  their aorege ar4 nproxvikste a"Ount of ryain u~d pepr 
tmon were oa tMn  d; 
 
    Itephen cr~ee. - fe3: in ie vares. 
 
    W lot - plus0o Wv'j ionvetiA tor for W7:ASn. 
 
    OUs=er ;Srrett - .0to N Wael ingUiWueV iad agent for some 
thLity a:o  i&.L shooting plaees WOth marh 3     field pen type 
rotitnt $  1ooteS to theri, 
 
     ic-rd Er o   -       a uth of ýeardztwn haB one shootlnr 
pen,. 
 
    ouch Aoh lub -   0ivate AAub M anres, two blinds, 
Wenty-six neabcyn, avertge between seven anc eight    ushels 
of ceorn per day. 
 
    Sred I. Oxinx - ýeoretary illinos lIver Duck   hoeters 
A~woeakition. 
 
    "i reaChIy 0o- Ar4 Gun club - inivaie club 170C cres, tCiWy- 
thine, ie rs, 5.0 acres set avide as rei ge, feed 5OC to 
b0 busDeyiis of sorn Cei ýCAonl, Seven. pens 
 
    L. M. na"hausen - rivte CSub lGOQ   eares all under water 
wklich is A Y ed and ju, 1ed, feed abou t -OC6  busý LS of corn 
us1 ow wILat 0nd barley duriig seEasn,. 
 
    ji  . .U' 1rty -F irAer with two field pens ta.- ibn  ay 
  1 0 UV    0 A, -00 acsoe  farx feeds auout LOs b eLs of Acovn pr 
 
 
     nae.Ll  ~int -tiv~wc jku   0.Q "cie 7Arr, t";et vfied 
 p=31, feed nbea dO bnosMys of corn per season, 
 
    Lh      Club - inea z  je,      about C"G 1 u he0 of 
 corn an jop 0o-n. 
 
     Auiven Creek ub -  ji !Vite club, eigh, penv, fed 440 
 jujws of Coan iast sea, on. 
 
    M It2hell ,Iros. - C riril dY shootin pisce, tour pens 
 fee. bteen c 40= bni Z nO0 bus-els of orn durlr  aeusn 
 !il s so 837L birds from est pen last year. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
I7 
 
 
   Louis fTIrff - ;omiercia Diy Shootin= Plaoe 
   Director 2" "&o 
 
   C-i nwrifht Gun diub - Private Alub1v,  aC      n  pen 
twC Averuei, fed 5L o 70 7L shyeis o  coin then quWt  as baWd3 
ere no"t woin    in to ther. 
 
   C0rtWriuht Untinc ,iub - rlve slub, S0O acreo saný, 
foun pens, seventeen 1ee     feed on fverae In00 1M  Nise  of 
coan l u" n, seasoln. 
 
   Old  iver ýuck Club      Oivue Alub, qQL0 mcrs, four    ens 
(u6e twenty birds in tI   pen and tie out five), tVrce UIOberp, 
  f~edab~    o50  shele of corn per sean~n.   X2i 1Z768, 
 
 
      I*?r AeM Asub -        ywvte Club, ,00 t pees, 
tOree rmbers, feed aocut aeven buslevs of corn per day. 1iant 
rye in fall in dr   river b0d nn, ýYftcr it gs stprteJ pip 
wmter in n±es    Voom UKe. Jed 150 bunnenL of Soor   'fVr season.

 
    "'uiver ee. Gun Club - i r vfte Mlub, 800 acres, three pens, 
feed about LOw bWAheS c omr sens ri. 
 
   Fred Appert -Co so reial dac,    &Q So war o rs, 
fou0 penn, fKen about O00 :cc  b e  of covn Chirty buahaw of wheat. 
 
   u. . -. cI2a  - Coýurai 1 Lay &oot  ani farAng, 
t  ee pens, fee; A    bye ea n corn i0C hui  lsv Areat. 
 
    Crane ike Club - : riva    .2ub, k450 arcel, 12L0 wcre   rest 
ronund, twenty uepbern, fourteen pens, feed about   0   buAM   els 
of corn and wiLeat, do not Weed /Eno uand. 
 
    Clenr Oh, nUKl COub -     Avljte Club, X00  acrens, all of 
Clear iý in cret ground shoot arahen    nd tQW;r Uolea, 
syevnteen men ber*, 
    ile Lite Cl~ub - Coneri'U  day shoo~ing place, CG>00 4cres 
(thIee other e . elubs on pr.rty) :hree 0", avTri oe . 
 
b00e010 of cor   &nd wo t     nn  C  e ated , A0 w es 
gro;Unc 0 Jed CO birds0 to.l nIt 
 
    .uOk Island r- unAlný club -    weAbers un  day   o 
,Ww sereA, 700 Cees qp, five Aetbcrs, f. n  , 
acres rst Vani ..    L 14 
       nadb- cui o  1g  ' LakeW( 
    %'oodla~r Gun Club -7 An- Clut, WCC oea, eV'n           , 
eight penn, feeC LOG0 bushels o   corn seasn, >o(    
	
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Pri1cetoln Mub - >rtvateý lub, 1"40     n"e, "V

pnnS, reod &boUt 15N0 out ý 1  of corn, planted so fe lax and

ziflet but did not do ncell, 70C acres not u!iot. ill up to 
~eeber 83 wn 50. 
 
   01i": 00a. - ionreiaj aay Khoo~itg cjizice al;d Knberv, 
1.10 ac'es, .eval hrbar, t~irteen Xoýes .don't us     pens 
takc bixdo C trlin        in aA nLi .k), f .ed abMot 00 bul " Ls 
of corn por soasJf. 
   Lnaeen Fdra unoin rlub I I      a 0 Uoo   n0 f geese at I o  o- 
sloe  C I eeen cooc ponu zac onie duWo    at, v/   no aes, feed 
01iY ay ±n3  o of cozy jer dIy, killed 71j C  eese Ia st    Orn 
and oveZ uO W     o iU0lo/t  L 
 
    SAury. l  coniAtuoni  of the gic az   contents of 
 ~eun on te T11inMiM     I ver reveAled 1   t* folloWKin: 
 
 1. corn,    eWvteed 6. enpty   ii. wiest      Is. leisYt spiKe 
 aaorn         / wor" 1L. a~in -1 
 e. epty         c. cofn i. 1't~Led root 
 4, CC L L1 ot J. CC 1           ii. Z0 L7. tweeI , 
 5. corn      10. corn 15. corM     corn, 0r.s 
 
 is. sedje .Af, xootstOwS M5. watarhen , rice 1ut gass 
 10. corn, svevg Leaf            0. 0r0,= rootstock 
 Lb. cors, rice Cut gra s, water 27. "  raes n oo ttor's, pondweed,

       loop                     Q a 1r hem, 
 L, sa, tweed, ;ace "iondweed 
 0". " Lilv, . 10,10 lily seed 
 26. corn,  ravs 
 24, corn, guasv 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
TR.MK. REG. U.S. PAT. OFF; 
 
 
t 
 
 
2 (  
 
 
 
 
 
CA 
 
 
4I 
 
 
2 
 
 
4: 
 
 
 
4: 
w 
 
  

					
				
				
 
I 27 
,   ,,,   4 
 
 
0' 
 
  

					
				
				
    RESTORATION OF SPRING LAKE 
    OCCIVIES ATTENTION OF ILLI- 
          iU)4OIS SPORTSMEN 
 
  There is a strong movement being fostered in the 
Prairie State to cause Illinois government officials 
to restore the vanished glory of Spring Lake, once 
acknowledged among the finest hunting and fishing 
grounds in the entire country. This action, led by 
the Pekin Chapter of the Izaak Walton League, 
seeks to regain for sportsmen throughout the state 
the whole acreage that formerly comprised this 
paradise for game and fish. Leaders in the move- 
ment declare that the time is ripe for successful 
action. Efforts are being made to have the Spring 
Lake area converted into a federal bird refuge or, 
this failing, these militant sportsmen, fighting for 
the restoration of a former hunting and fishing 
paradise, will seek to persuade state conservation 
officials to aid in restoring the former beauties of 
the lake. A brief history of the Spring Lake area 
may be interesting to those not familiar with its 
past glory. 
  About in the center of the state of Illinois are 
situated Tazewell and Mason Counties, which are 
bounded on the west by the Illinois River. This 
area has been a Mecca for duck shooters since rail- 
roads and highways have permitted visitations, and 
there are today in this region more clubs and pre- 
serves given over to lake, marsh and stream hunt- 
ing than any other equal space in the state. 
  Without consideration of the merits of drainage 
projects in so many parts of the United States, which 
reclaim thousands upon thousands of acres for farm- 
ing, sometimes economically, let us look at the 
sportsman's side-the tragedy of changing the face 
of nature. 
  Hundreds of thousands of years ago nature began 
the task of making this particular region a sports- 
man's paradise. Geologically speaking, it may very 
well be one of the oldest portions of the American 
continent as disclosed by formational phenomena. 
In any event we know that Indians came and found 
this place very much to their liking. Here were 
lakes, rivers and forests, full of fish and alive with 
game. Several tribes lived hereabouts. In this 
section are found today evidence of the prehistoric 
race of mound builders. Were they the progenitors 
of the savages met by the early fathers who paddled 
from Lake Michigan to the Mississippi? 
  A region valued by the Indians has a call to 
the white man, woman or child who loves the out- 
doors. Wildness gets close to the heart. One of 
the many beauty spots in the extreme Southwest 
part of Tazewell County was a body of water nine 
miles long and three wide, with a translucent depth 
of twelve feet, having at its lower end an outlet 
into the Illinois River. Spring Lake, it was called, 
and in 1913 it covered 12,000 coveted acres. 
  The organization of a drainage and levee district, 
perhaps inspired by motives of economical progress, 
was the nemesis of Spring Lake. By the simple ex- 
pedient of sinking a barge load of sand in the canal 
which connected this spring fed lake water with 
the Illinois River at the northwest extremity, the 
engineers emptied Mud Lake, Wade Lake and to 
a large extent Spring Lake, which has dwindled 
to a narrow, shallow, moss encrusted creek, only 
the width of a city street in some places and three 
miles less in length than before it was disconnected 
from the flow of Illinois River. True enough, a 
lot of land was made by this engineering exploit 
and in the restricted area the water remains good, 
but it will no longer support abundant fish life 
because it does not receive a quota of food through 
the canal from the Illinois. In the good old days 
before drainage schemes were fathered by political 
appropriations, there were three steamboat landings 
on the east shore and a busy traffic wended up and 
down the pellucid waters. Boats carried coal and 
cattle, barges-a dozen at a time-were moored at 
the Smith-Hippen Company Elevator. Sportsmen, 
following the example of the two presidents, Benja- 
min Harrison and Grover Cleveland, who came here 
to shoot and fish, found Spring Lake a favorite spot. 
Excursions were advertised and run by the rail- 
 
 
roads and handbills boasted of the superlative bass 
fishing. Sometimes these scrappers went to nine 
pounds! 
  Spring Lake in its original condition was one of 
the best resting grounds for migratory waterfowl 
and a natural spawning bed for game fish. Although 
the drainage project was for the redemption of agri- 
cultural land and claimed to be ninety per cent 
success, it destroyed navigation for both commerce 
and pleasure. That this engineering feat though 
geared to scientific calculations, was not a good 
financial venture is testified to by the defaulted 
bonds of the Drainage District and the cries of the 
present land owners groaning under $11 an acre 
taxation. Land coveted when farm      prices were 
high and going up has lost its attractiveness. 
  The Pekin Chapter of the Izaak Walton League 
of Illinois has prepared for distribution a history 
of the Spring Lake area together with information 
touching present conditions. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                        ,       /       A 
 
         r/ 
 
  

					
				
				
 
, bINt 
 
 
I NlIEDNIifl DIPVQ 
 
 
"0 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
'on 
ts, 
 
 
 
r, 
a 
 
 
and game to provide better sport. 
n  ",0% Y A M w" mV-A-UV,,,,, ,Vi 
 
 
UU      LIMII11W      I IUI- 
 
 
GROUP TO ADVISE 
 
        ONSE                    ' 
 
 
 
 
 
 Otto Hasss leo     Chiago Is 
 
      Named Chairman. 
 
 
      BY    BOB BECKER. 
  'Illinois now has a staff of conserva- 
tion advisers as the result of action 
taken yesterday by Gov. Emmerson. 
According to an Associated Press dis- 
patch  from   Springfield five well 
known sportsmen have been appoint- 
ed advisers to the Illinois department 
of conservation, of which Ralph B. 
Bradford is the head. 
  "Those named by -the governor are 
Otto Hassel, Chicago business man 
and sportsman; TW, R. James, presi- 
dent of the west park board, Chicago;- 
Tosiah Tretharne, president of the Illi- 
nois division of the  izaak Walton 
league; Ben C. Overman, former di- 
rector of the Izaak Walton league, 
and William C. Duncan, Alton manu- 
facturer.  Mr. Hassel was named 
chairman of the group. 
    Northern Illinois Sportsmen. 
  At least four of the five advisers 
are well known to northern Illinois 
sportsmen. ,Mr. Hassel is one of Chi- 
cago's most ardent duck hunters and 
owns an extensive shooting preserve 
on the Sangamon river. W. R. James, 
active in the Lincoln Park Trapshoot- 
ing club, and an expert wing shot, 
was one of the leaders in the recent 
fight to give Illinois the month of 
November for duck hunting. 
  Josiah Treharne of Joliet is known 
to thousands of sportsmen throughout 
the state because of his work as head 
of the Izaak Walton league and more 
recently for his leadership in the cam- 
paign' t9 abolish the open season on 
hen pheasants. 
  .Advise Conservation Board. 
  Ben   C. Overman is one of   the 
state's most interested students of 
conservation problems and Is conver- 
sant With the quail situation down 
stt.M.Duncan is one of the lead. 
ing sportsmen In the southern part 
of the state. 
  Although no information Is avail- 
able: regarding the duties of this board 
of advisers, It Is presumed that the 
members will counsel the department 
of conservation regarding policies and 
a program to give the 340,000 Illinois 
hunters and many more thousands of 
fishermen In the s -te enough fish~ 
 
 
r. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
RESPASSING by irresponsible hunt- 
    ers, fishermen and trappers, with 
careless and sometimes wanton destruc- 
tion of property and livestock has be- 
come a serious menace to the farmers 
of Illinois. 
  It is true that a farmer may post his 
land and prosecute trespassers. How- 
ever, this is unsatisfactory, as no farm- 
er has time to be a policeman, and in 
many instances prosecutions are said 
to have been followed by deliberate 
property damage. 
  The farmer should own the game and 
game birds on his farm. He is the one 
who feeds and protects the game and 
he should be entitled to compensation 
when he permits hunters to kill any of 
the game. The hunter has no more 
right to take game from the farmer 
without permission and without paying 
for it than the farmer has to go to town 
and get money, groceries, clothing or 
legal or medical advice without paying 
for them. 
  Realizing these facts a group of 
sportsmen met and incorporated, not 
for profit, the "Sportsmen's Mutual." 
This organization has worked out a 
plan which to all practical purposes 
places the ownership of game in the 
farmer on whose land it is found; fur- 
 
 
nishes him with protection against the 
irresponsible and unprincipled hunter; 
protects him against property damage 
that may result from hunting; compen- 
sates him for increasing the supply of 
game and for extending the privilege 
of hunting to sportsmen who are will- 
ing to do their share to increase the 
game supply and permit the farmers to 
profit from it. 
  This plan was submitted by these 
sportsmen to individual farmers in dif- 
ferent sections of the state for their 
criticisms and suggestions. It was then 
submitted to the Illinois Agricultural 
Association and to the attorney for the 
association for further suggestions and 
to be sure that no harm could possibly 
come to the farmer from participating 
in this plan. 
  Under this plan the Sportsmen's Mu- 
tual proposes to lease from the individ- 
ual farmers the shooting, fishing and 
trapping rights for the members of the 
Mutual. Very few, If any, of the men- 
bers of this organization will ever de- 
sire to do any trapping, but we do feel 
that by including trapping in this lease, 
we will be able to save for the farmer 
and his boys the trapping on his farm. 
The revenue which the farmer's boys 
w$Ul Aoi-1vA tinm *h tlm-u wehoinn. 
 
 
                    AND 
   GAME FISH PRESERVE 
                                 'OF 
 
 
 
 
,SPORTSMEN'N'" MUTUAL!' 
 
                 HUNTING FISHING - TRAPPING 
 
       r '^R MEMBERSA- FAMILIES ONLY 
 
 
   C. F. M A INS A E L D  SPRINGFIELD 
   ý-XVCUTIVU SECRETARY 
                                                     ILLINOIS 
 
 
   PATROLLED BY GAME PIZOTECTORS 
 
 
   Let Game Pay Taxes 
 
Sporsmen Plan to Pay for It-By C. F. Mansfield * 
 
 
Rqwi ed From Prairie Famer August 22, 1931 
 
 
Springfield, 1111sols 
 
 
erly protected, will hmount to a tre- 
mendous sum for the entire state and 
in many instances will bring in more 
than enough money to pay the taxes. 
  Under the terms of this lease no 
member of the Sportsmen's Mutual may 
hunt without first securing permission 
from the farmer upon presentation of 
his membership card, hunting license 
and property damage insurance card. 
The farmer specifies the amount of each 
kind of game that may he killed and 
the member is limited to that number. 
At the end of the day's hunting the 
member of the Sportsmen's Mutual 
checks out at the farm and pays the 
farmer for the privilege of hunting 
based upon the amount of game that 
he has killed. 
  The Sportsmen's Mutual has pur- 
chased an insurance policy which fully 
protects the farmer against any prop- 
erty damage that may be caused by 
any of our members. 
  This lease is not a cloud upon the 
title to the property as it is specifically 
provided that the sale of any or all of 
the land covered by the lease automati- 
cally cancels the lease. 
  In order to insure an Increase in the 
game supply and to prevent overcrowd- 
Ing or excessive hunting on any farm 
the membership in the Sportsmen's 
Mutual is limited to one member for 
each 200 acres. The State of Pennsyl- 
vania, which has the best hunting in 
the United States, has only 57 acres 
for each hunter. In addition to this, 
a minimum of $12.50 per member is 
spent each year for the propogation 
and protection of game and fish on the 
leased farms. 
  To further promote cooperation and 
a friendly spirit between the farmer 
and the sportsmen, the Sportsmen's 
Mutual issues a guest card to each 
farmer who signs a lease. This guest 
card is good anywhere in the county 
and is to be used under the terms of 
the lease. 
  We believe that if we can lease two 
million acres of land in Illinois we will 
bring to the farmers of Illinois a new 
source of revenue that in many in- 
stances can be developed to more than 
enough to pay their taxes. We will also 
provide a protection for their property 
which they have never had and which 
they are needing more and more each 
year, and at the same time will in- 
crease the supply of game and game 
birds for everyone. 
*Executive Secretary Sportsmen's Mutual, 
 
 
will derive from the furs when - 
 
 
r 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                      For Release, Tuesday P.M. M4arch 10th 
 
     Springfield, Ill., I~varc lOth ----Mre than 50,000 acres ofiland 
in Illinois have been leased as game sanctuaries and shooting, fishing 
and camping grounds by the Sportsmen's Mutual, according to a state- 
ment made by executive secretary, C, F. Mansfield cf Springfield, here 
 
to,1y, at A meeting of the Senate Forestry, Fish and Game Committee. 
     "Under the terms of this lease the Sportsmen's Mutual proposes
to 
set aside part of the land as sanctuaries, to carry orn a campaign of 
predatory animal and bird control and to stock these sanctuaries with 
game and fish produced in our own game farms and hatcheries" Mansfield

said. '.The organization also proposes to assume full legal liability 
for damag e done by any of its memberb -to farmer 's property, 
     "The farmer will be pajid for the privileges extended on the basis

 
of game killed ana grain fed. His property will be patrolled by 
 
skilled gaar.e protectors paid by the organizatlion and enrtirely free 
froe the influence and control of wat~eful spoiis p-olitieians. 
     "Ten thousand acres leased in each county in Illinois, or a 
total of 2,OOOO00 acres protected against game hogs, hawks, crows and 
otier predatory birds and animals and stocked with game and fish from 
our own game farms and hatchieries is the goal which the organization 
offieers have set" said Mr. Mansfield. 
     "The almost complete breakdown in law enforcement by the conser-

vation departrrent, coupled with a failure to maintain and properly 
operate state game farms and fish hatcheries, apparently is one of 
the underlying causes for the desperate shortage of game and fish in 
 
i2ýinois. Abandoned game farms, neglected fish hatcheries, with at

least one of tlhem used for boating and a swimming pool, seem to be 
the outstanding] results achieved *in the past two years although the 
sportsmen of Illinois during that period have paid int- the Conser- 
 
vation department more than a million dollars in license fees. 
 
     "Unless this session of the legislature stops all shooting for
one 
year to give the quail, prairie chicken and'pheasant an opportunity 
to return to a normal population, the farmers and nature undoubtedly 
will put ?n a permanent closed season. 
 
      "Sportsmen of Illinois do not relish the idea of a closed season

but it is the penalty we must pay for not sooner demanding efficiency 
and a wise expenditure of our license money and the elimination of 
wasteful spoils politics in conservation." 
 
  

					
				
				
 
/, 
 
 
Bonds Gain Support 
 
 
HE proposed bond issue to develop in Illinois a big 
    statewide system of lands devoted to conservation, rec- 
reation, and public hunting and fishing has gained friends 
rapidly during the past two years. At the general election 
last November 1,756,000 voters cast their ballots on the 
question of a $14,000,000 bond issue. 
  Of this large vote there was a majority of almost 18,000 
in favor of it. The proposition received about 150,000 
more votes than any of the eight proposals then before 
the Illinois voters, but because of the peculiar law govern- 
ing such matters the bond issue failed by almost 117,000. 
   In 1928 the vote on a similar $20,000,000 proposal was 
defeated by 400,000 votes. The Legislature of 1929 re- 
duced the amount to $14,000,000 and re-submitted it to the 
voters at the election of 1930. Friends of the measure in- 
                               tend to re-introduce the plan 
                               in the present general assem- 
                               bly in order that it may again 
                               be submitted to the voters in 
                               1932. 
             r   o, New York has developed 
                               her great public parks pro- 
                               gram through bond i s s u e s 
                               and California is now devel- 
                               oping a system of state parks 
                               with funds obtained from a 
                               "bond issue and by local and 
                               private contributions.' The 
                               only other state, in addition 
                               to Illinois, New York and 
                               California, ever to vote on 
                               such a proposal is Pennsyl- 
                               vania. That state voted upon 
                               and defeated a $25,000,000 
                               bond issue for state forests, 
                               but in that case public lead- 
                               ers, after seeing the wide- 
                               spread public interest in the 
                               program, definitely promised 
                               to appropriate funds from 
                               public coffers as rapidly as 
                               needed. It, therefore, served 
                               a most useful purpose and 
                               was worth all the effort made 
                               in behalf of the bond issue. 
                                 The Illinois proposal was 
                              unique in that the bonds were 
                              to be retired from funds de- 
                              rived from hunting and fish- 
                              ing licenses and not from 
                              other sources. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
Just for your information we have sent out 6,000 of these today. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Closed Season on All Game Urged 
                     By SENATOR CHARLES W. BAKER, Chairman 
                           Senate Fish and Game Committee 
 
 
                      SENATE BILL 100 PROHIBITS ALL SHOOTING 
 
 
    Springfield, Ill., Feb. 3, 1931-Repeal of the game code, a closed season
on all game in 
Illinois for two years, and the ownership of all game declared to be in the
owner of the land 
upon which it is found was advocated as the solution of the desperate shortage
of game exist- 
ence in Illinois by Senator Charles W. Baker of Monroe Center, Chairman of
the Senate Fish 
and Game Committee in a statement issued here today. 
    "Years of restrictive legislation coupled with the payment of many
millions of dollars in 
hunting license fees to the Conservation Department have failed to maintain
or increase the 
supply of game," said Senator Baker. "The farmers who have prohibited
shooting have done 
more to save a remnant of our wild life than all of our laws and the game
wardens who have 
been paid by the hunting license fees. 
    "The prairie chicken, quail and the partridge of former days are
almost extinct. These 
and other varieties of game will soon be found only in museums unless we
take immediate and 
drastic action," Senator Baker said further. 
    " enniov shnntinff hut I am willine to aive it un for a counle of
years so that mv children 
 
 
HoN. CHAS. W. BAKER  and the children of other citizens of this state may
have some opportunity to enjoy nature as 
   Monroe Center      I have done.                                      
                                   I 
   "The voters failed to approve a plan to establish sanctuaries and
public recreation grounds in every county in 
the state at the last election, so stopping of shooting apparently remains
as the last opportunity to protect our fast- 
disappearing birds and animals of field and forest." 
 
 
                                Secretary Mansfield Announces 
       New Sportsmen's Mutual-Farmer Co-operative Game Preserve Plan 
 
                50,000 Acres Now Available for Members-Goal Set Is 2,000,000
Acres In Illinois 
 
    Springfield, Ill., March 10-More than 50,000 acres of land in Illinois
have been leased as game sanctuaries and 
shooting, fishing and camping grounds by the Sportsmen's Mutual, according
to a statement made by Executive Secretary 
C. F. Mansfield of Springfield, here today, at a meeting of the Senate Forestry,
Fish and Game Committee. 
    "Under the terms of this lease the Sportsmen's Mutual proposes to
set aside part of the land as sanctuaries, to 
carry on a campaign of predatory animal and bird control and to stock these
sanctuaries with game and fish produced 
in our own game farms and hatcheries," Mansfield said. "The organization
also proposes to assume full legal liability 
for damage done by any of its members to farmers' property." 
    "The farmer will be paid for the privileges extended on the basis
of game killed and grain fed. His property will 
be patroled by skilled game protectors paid by the organization and entirely
free from the influence and control of 
wasteful spoils politicians. At least fifty percent of the annual membership
dues will be expended for game and fish 
propagation and protection. 
    "Ten thousand acres leased in each county with a total of 2,000,000
acres in Illinois protected against game hogs, 
hawks, crows and other predatory birds and animals and stocked with game
and fish from our own game farms and 
hatcheries is the goal which the organization officers have set," said
Mr. Mansfield. 
 
                              CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT BREAKDOWN 
 
    "The almost complete breakdown in law enforcement by the conservation
department, coupled with a failure to 
maintain and properly operate state game farms and fish hatcheries, apparently
is one of the underlying causes for the 
desperate shortage of game and fish in Illinois. Abandoned game farms, neglected
fish hatcheries, with at least one 
of them used for boating and a swimming pool, seem to be the outstanding
results achieved in the past two years al. 
though the sportsmen of Illinois during that period have paid into the conservation
department more than a million 
dollars in license fees. 
    "Unless this session of the legislature stops all shooting for one
year to give the quail, prairie chicken and pheas- 
ant an opportunity to return to a normal population, the farmers and nature
undoubtedly will put on a permanent 
closed season. 
    "Sportsmen of Illinois do not relish the idea of a closed season
but it is the penalty we must pay for not sooner 
demanding efficiency and a wise expenditure of our license money and the
elimination of wasteful spoils politics in 
conservation." 
 
  

					
				
				
 
                  LEGISLATIVE BULLETIN 
                                            of the 
 
                       SPORTSMEN'S MUTUAL 
 BULLETIN No. 57a2                                                      
     MARCH 31, 1931 
                     SYNOPSIS OF BILLS INTRODUCED PRIOR TO MARCH 31st 
 S. B. 100, Baker-Prohibits killing all game and game birds. No time limit.

 S. B. 180, 181, 182, Searcy-Provide Department of Conservation may lease
but not buy lands for game and fish pre- 
     serves and for forest preserves. 
 S. B. 202, Mason-Fishing in fish preserve with one hook and line only. 
 H. B. 85, Handy-Shortens season on squirrels and foxes and raises non-resident
license fee from $15.50 to $26.50. 
 H. B. 87, Kuechler-Prohibits shooting quail and prairie chickens until 1934
and then allows five day open season. 
     Prohibits use of dog or gun in killing minks. 
H. B. 177, Borders-Prohibits all trapping except wolves. 
H. B. 394, Rush-Repeals ten cent fee now collected for each bird or animal
or dozen eggs sold by game breeders. 
H. B. 431, Allen-Employees of wholesale fur buyers to pay license fee of
$5.00, breeders to pay 2% on amount of 
     sales. 
H. B. 432, Allen-Extends date for use of seines from April 15 to April 25.

H. B. 433, Allen-Removes all protection from foxes. 
H. B. 473, Waller-Prohibits use of gun holding more than two shells. 
H. B. 497, Waller-Prohibits shooting of any game bird within one-eighth mile
of any place where corn or grain is 
     deposited. 
H. B. 550, Allen-Prohibits possession of any game bird ten days after season
has closed. 
H. B. 551, Allen-Prohibits killing of prairie chicken indefinitely. 
H. B. 552, Allen-Non-resident tourist fishing license, good for seven days.
Fee $1.10. 
H. B. 685, Roe-Prohibits killing all game birds except migratory birds until
November 10, 1933. 
H. B. 697, 698 and 700, TICE-REAPPROPRIATES $960,000.00 FOR FLOOD RELIEF.
NOTE-THESE BILLS 
     WILL PROVIDE STATE TAX MONEY FOR DREDGING THE MOUTH OF THE SANGAMON
RIVER. SEE 
     QUESTION 19 ON PAGE 4. 
 
                                   Committee Action 
    Both Senate and House, Fish and Game Committees have met and decided
to refer all bills amending the game 
code to "Game Code" Sub-Committees. Fish code amendments likewise
will be submitted to "Fish Code" Sub-Com. 
mittees. 
                            Personnel of Sub-Committees 
                   SENATE                                        HOUSE 
                                                       Rep. Henry C. Allen,
Chairman 
Game Code                                     Game Code 
    Sen. Simon E. Lantz, Chairman.               Rep. Martin B. Lohmann.

    Sen. Ray Paddock.                            Rep. Harry M. McCaskrin.

    Sen. Charles W. Baker.                       Rep. J. E. McMackin. 
Fish Code                                        Rep. James J. MeVicker.

    Sen. Victor P. Michel, Chairman.             Rep. Truman A. Snell. 
    Sen. Martin R. Carlson.                   Fish Code 
    Sen. William R. McCauley.                    Rep. John Acker. 
                                                 Rep. Fred Bestold. 
                                                 Rep. Carroll Bush. 
                                                 Rep. E. W. Mureen. 
                                                 Rep. William G. Thon. 
 
Destruction of Rest Grounds and the end of 
 
Duck Shooting in the Sangamon-Illinois District 
 
will be the answer unless H. B. 697,698 and 700 
 
are killed or amended to exclude the Sangamon River. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
SPORTSMEN'S MUTUAL 
                   INCORPORATED NOT FOR PROFIT 
 
 
           OFFICERS 
        GRAND PRESIDENT 
     WILLIAM DUNCAN. ALTON 
     GRAND VICE PRESIDENTS 
TRUMAN A. SNELL, CARLINVILLE 
  THOMAS A. JOURNY, ROCK ISLAND 
COL. GEORGE G. SEAMAN, TAYLORVILLE 
    GUY B. WAKELEY, HARVARD 
  ROBERT N. CRAWFORD, MENDOTA 
        GRAND TREASURER 
   E. E. CRABTREE, JACKSONVILLE 
      GRAND MEDICAL OFFICER 
DR. P. R. BLODGETT, CHICAGO HEIGHTS 
  GRAND EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
  C. F. MANSFIELD, SPRINGFIELD 
 
 
OFFICE OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
     LELAND OFFICE BUILDING 
     SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 
 
 
   Incorporators 
 
 
     BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
WILLIAM DUNCAN, ALTON 
BROOKE ANDERSON, CHICAGO 
TRUMAN A. SNELL, CARLINVILLE 
THOMAS A. JOURNY, ROCK ISLAND 
E. E. CRABTREE, JACKSONVILLE 
JOHN H. WALKER, SPRINGFIELD 
DENNIS McCARTHY, SPRINGFIELD 
COL. GEO. G. SEAMAN, TAYLORVILLE 
DR. A. E. RIVES, E. ST. LOUIS 
H. C. NORCROSS, CARLYLE 
C. F. MANSFIELD, SPRINGFIELD 
          38 
 
 
    Brooke Anderson-Chicago and Highland Park- 
President Red Top Steel Post Company, Past President 
Campfire Club, Member Izaak Walton League, Member 
Advisory Board U. S. Biological Survey, Prominent 
Sportsman and Big Game Hunter. 
    E. E. Crabtree-Jacksonville--Past President Illinois 
Bankers Association, Former Mayor Jacksonville, Trustee 
Illinois Woman's College, Banker. 
    Truman    A. Snell - Carlinville - Attorney-at-Law, 
President State Elks Association, First Vice-President Illi- 
nois Division of Izaak Walton League of America. 
    Col. George   G. Seaman-Taylorville-Active     in 
Legion, First State Commander in Illinois, Farmer, Presi- 
dent Illinois Reserve Officers Association of U. S. 
    William  Duncan-Alton-President Illinois Stoker 
Co., Duncan Foundry and Machine Works, Incorporated. 
 
 
    Thomas A. Journy--Rock Island-President Rock 
Island Rod & Reel Club. 
    Dr. A. E. Rives-E. St. Louis-Physician and Surgeon, 
President Associated Egyptian Anglers, Park Board, E. 
St. Louis. 
    H. C. Norcross-Carlyle--Journalist, President Illinois 
Sportsmen's League. 
    Dennis McCarthy-Springfield-Secretary Joint Labor 
Legislative Board, Brotherhood Locomotive Firemen and 
Enginemen. 
    John H. Walker-Springfield-Former President Illi- 
nois State Federation of Labor, Secretary-Treasurer United 
Mine Workers of America. 
    C. F. Mansfield-Springfield-President Midwest Sup- 
ply Co.-Secretary Illinois Uniform Conservation, Forestry 
& Fish & Game Laws Commission-Member Legislative 
Committee Illinois Division Izaak Walton League. 
 
 
Robert H. Morse, Chicago 
C. J. Hug, Highland 
Frank T. Sheets, Springfield 
Charles W. Firke, Monticello 
Frederick Grant, Terre Haute, ind. 
John L. Smith, Springfield 
W. A. Carlson, Chicago 
George D. Duncan, Alton 
P. W. Beda, Chicago 
R. R. MacLeod, Springfield 
0. K. Owen, Terre Haute, Ind. 
H. N. Scott, Chicago 
Gail B. Ranson, Springfield 
N. Landon Hoyt, Chicago 
 
 
A Few of Our Members 
E. A. Russell, Chicago 
H. E. Procunier, Oak Park 
J. A. LaChapelle, Chicago 
Carroll E. Gray, Jr., Chicago 
Jesse F. Matteson, Chicago 
C. S. Pope, Chicago 
George F. Henneberry, Chicago, Ill. 
Neil Metcalf, Momence 
George C. Davis, Chicago 
Charles Einfeldt, Oak Park 
Nelson L. Barnes, Chicago 
Franke Meine, Chicago 
Edwin F. Swift Jr., Chicago 
 
 
Henry G. Miller, Chicago 
H. C. Aulwurn, Blue Island 
F. P. Hixon, Lake Forest 
Leslie Wheeler, Chicago 
F. Matthiessen, Beverly Hills, California 
Fred H. Farnsworth, Chicago 
R. E. Hammond, Chicago 
Irving J. Bissell, Grand Rapids, 
    Michigan 
Dr. Herman H. Cole, Springfield 
John J. Mitchell, Chicago 
William Einfeldt, Oak Park 
Stuart Logan, Chicago 
 
 
             What the Sportsmen's Mutual Will Provide 
The Sportsmens Mutual Will Provide in Addition to Our Leased Hunting and
Fishing Grounds: 
 
 
  Membership in hunting, fishing 
and camping clubs, with Club Houses 
and cottages. 
  Our own game propagation and 
protection. 
  Interest in and use of all club 
grounds, wherever located, for all 
complete members. 
  The opportunity to help in a pro- 
gram to establish conservation and 
forest preserves, and public recrea- 
tion grounds. 
  The combined power of the pur- 
chasers of more than three-quarters 
of a million hunting and fishing lis- 
ences in Illinois alone, to wage un- 
ceasing and relentless war against the 
 
 
criminal extravagance and misuse of 
the sportsman's money by wasteful 
spoils politicians. 
  Travel accident insurance, includ- 
ing accidents incurred while hunting 
and fishing. 
  Insurance against property damage 
caused by members while hunting. 
  The opportunity to help establish 
a fund to care for less fortunate 
brother sportsmen and their families. 
  While they are still available at 
present low prices, suitable hunting, 
fishing and recreation grounds. 
  An interest in the enhancement in 
value of these sites in which each 
member has an equal interest and 
 
 
which should greatly exceed the fees 
and dues. 
  Association with the highest type 
of sportsmen. 
  Trapshooting, bait and fly casting, 
hunting, fishing and other outdoor 
sports in competition with other real 
sportsmen. 
  For you and your family the en- 
joyment of camping, boating and 
bathing at your own resort, away 
from the nerve racking noise, heat 
and dirt of the city. 
     The Sportsmen's Mutual 
        Leland Office Bldg. 
          Springfield, Ill. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
                                     Questionnaire 
    We all know that migratory waterfowl and all other kinds of game are
becoming less plentiful each year. 
    The officers of SPORTSMENS MUTUAL are striving to stop this decrease,
to restore our game supply and our sport, 
and to prevent the loss of the millions of dollars that are invested in gun
clubs. 
    This questionnaire is submitted so that we may have the best judgment
of those interested. 
    Our Legislative Committee will be governed by the MAJORITY VOTE of our
members in working for or against 
the following propositions before the general assembly: 
              VOTE ON EVERY PROPOSITION BY UNDERSCORING YES OR NO AS DESIRED

 1. Shall all shooting be prohibited for three or more years? ...................N.......................................................
Yes  No 
 2. Shall all shooting (except migratory waterfowl) be prohibited for three
or more years? ................ Yes           No 
 3. Shall all shooting  be  prohibited  for  two  years? ...............................................................................-.............
--- Yes  No 
 4. Shall all shooting (except migratory waterfowl) be prohibited for two
years with the provision that 
    the Conservation Laws Commission be empowered to conduct a game survey
and investigation in co- 
    operation with the U. S. Biological Survey and declare season open after
one year if game supply is 
    found to be norm al?  ..................................................................................................................................................
 Y es  N o 
 5. Shall shooting be prohibited within one-eighth mile of any feed pen?
..........-........................................... Yes  No 
 6. Shall live  decoys be  limited  to  five  per  pen? .......................................................................................................
 Yes  No 
 7. Shall guns be limited to two shots and one gun per man, not including
pusher? ....................................... Yes  No 
 8. Shall a bill for a State-wide system    of conservation and forest preserves
and        public   recreation 
    grounds, providing for 35%     sanctuaries and 65%    public shooting
grounds in every county, to be 
    paid for by 30% of the present license fees and 90% of any increased
license fees be submitted to refer- 
    endum  in 1932 --------------------------------------------------------------------
--.....................................................................................
  Yes  No 
 9. Shall certain days be rest days with no shooting?---------------------------------------....................................................
Yes  No 
                                                              (Indicate which
days each week.) 
10. Shall open season be shortened? (Indicate  dates.) ..........................................................................................
 Yes  No 
11. Shall daily bag limit be reduced?     (Indicate number.) .....................................................................................
Yes  No 
12. Shall season lim it  be  established? ...........................................................................................................................
 Yes  No 
                                                                (Indicate
number for season.) 
13. Shall hours of shooting be limited each day? 9---- ..........................................................................................
Yes  No 
                                                                      (Indicate
Hours.) 
14. Shall shipping permits  be  prohibited? ..................................................................................................................
 Yes  No 
15. Shall employees of the Department of Conservation be prohibited from
owning or operating shoot- 
    ing clubs or fishing resorts where a fee is charged or from acting as
guides, pushers or caretakers 
    at clubs? ........................................................................................................................................................................
 Y es  N o 
16. Shall all trapping of fur bearing animals be prohibited? ..................................................................................
Yes  No 
17. Shall a hearing be arranged before the Game Code Sub-Committee in Chicago
on April 20 and also 
    at Springfield  on  April  22? .................................-...............
 ..............................................................................
  Yes  No 
18. At which hearing would you like  to  appear? ..................................................................-....................................

19. Shall House Bills 697, 698 and 700 be amended to prevent expenditure
of any state money in dredging 
    the mouth of the Sangamon River?       SEE PAGE 2 -----------------------------------------
...............------------------------------ Yes  No 
 
    We shall appreciate having your answers but, of course, WE CANNOT COUNT
YOUR VOTE UNLESS YOU 
ARE A MEMBER. 
 
C. F. MANSFIELD, Executive Secretary SPORTSMEN'S MUTUAL, INC. 
    Enclosed please find ten dollars ($10.00) for membership in the Sportsmen's
Mutual and for Legislative service. 
                  (If you have applied for membership write the word Member
after your name) 
 
............................................... ...................-    
- ................................................ 
              Name of Shooting Club                                     
    Name 
                                         SStreet                        
                City 
 
                                                                        
    State 
 
    I/ you want this questionnaire mailed to your friends send us their names
at once. 
 
                             Vote Will Be Tabulated April 15 
 
 
       "BREED MORE DUCKS AND GAME" 
 
                   WILL BE THE OUTSTANDING FEATURE OF OUR NEXT BULLETIN 
                                      DON'T MISS IT. JOIN NOW. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                         Release P.M. Papers, July 9, 1931. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     Springfield, Illinois, July 8th, 1931 ...... Distribution 
 
of live pheasants was started this week by the Sportsmen's 
 
Eutual from the 17agner Game F"rm at Hanry, Illinois, accord- 
 
inj to a statement made by C. F. IMiansfield, executive secretary, 
 
here today. 
 
     "The Sportsmen's Mutual this year has placed 3,000 pheasaný.

 
eggs on land2 leased<4jx Illinois for hunting by members of the 
 
'"utual.$ Weexpect to distribute 2,000 live birds this month. 
 
These birds will be liberated only on leased land and will be 
 
protected by game protectors. The farmer will then be paid 
 
for the shooting privilege extended to members of the Sportsmen'S 
 
Mutual. 
      "OThe first shipments were sent to Vermilion, ?iatt, McLeu:, 
 
Logan, Woodford, Macoupin and Greene Counties.   The balance of 
 
the 2,000 birds will be released in other countie.s to complete 
 
the stocking of our shooting grounds which now amount to more 
 
than 100,000 acres." 
 
  

					
				
				
 
           STATE OFILLINOIS 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
             SPRINGFIELD 
 
 
RALPH F. BRADFORD, DIRECTOR 
R E. DUVALL, AS-. Ds-cT-O 
 
 
                                 October 20, 1930. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
.r. Aldo Leopold, 
Gaoe Survey, 
421 Chemistry Building, 
'2a-iison  isconsin. 
 
Dear sir: 
 
           Comp-ying with your request of October 
st,        I a enclosing herewith fignres so,,ing 
the distributi    of oheasant egs and pheasants 
b, this Deoart ent during the past two years, 
and for the egg   distribution -eriod of 1930. 
The birds whicl have been produced in this year's 
hatching operations at the State Game Farms will 
not be distributed until after the exriration 
of the hunting season, probably abo t Deceb er 
12t. 
 
           I am 
 
 
                        Assistant Director 
 
 
 
 
R 
Enc osures. 
 
 
   ROOM 121 STATE CAPITOL 
TELEPHONE: CAPITOL !4 0 STATION 87 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    .10                   -        13 
     325                -       325 
              39         -        39 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3roan                              _15.. 
Nrot1,                  377       377 
 
 
    Cl k78               -            7 
,C1ay         78         --8 
Coler        117        --        17 
Coo1          ---      ?i,417   1A417 
LUfoZ        104.       -        1034 
 
 
 
Ci::ff r195             --           9 
 
 
    (3 ltl     5         20        91, 
aoug~e        3          -         05 
 
 
 
 
 
   1ey        95        -195 
 
 J~n@On       '(5       -        '05 
 
 ze 3ne             39  -- 
 
   -el         -. 4-05            41 
 La2d1197 ln 
 
 
1 .1 . 1 1 v 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
00 
  IViZk tOfl 
 
  C fl)Uh 
C f:fl 
C (1) 
  oon 
  Cou n 
 
  zion 
       *'1 
 on 
 
 
 
 
 on- :r 
 
 (fl   
 tie 
 
 
 itt 
 Ike 
 o>)e 
 22. :1. 
 uto 22 
 
 ich nd 
 oo 2nd 
 t    jAj 
 1 in 
    tIY)fl 
 ehuy. xr 
 eott 
 helby 
 tzk 
 V 
  ei.11 
 nion 
V  ilion 
abash 
 
aff flA ton 
1A to CtA8 
 
i' i-,n 
 
  )O £rd 
 
 
    I  
 
    13 
 
 
 
 
    1r, 
     
    4(5 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   p 
  p244 
 
 
 
     (I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14,434 
 
 
71 
Li? 
0 
975 
13 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
-C 
FA( 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
155 
 
 
us 
 
 
 
 
 
' us 
 
 
 
 
 
5:, 
 
14 
 
3 
 
 
    LA 
    13( 
    cii 
 
  I 
    200 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    I 
 
    7G 
    019 
 
    011 
 
 
    05 
 
 
 
     :3 
    24? 
    105 
    (JGO 
    l 44 
 
 
 
 
      C 
 
    /1. 
    £372 
 
 
    'Cu 
    I-ic 
 
 
 
 
    550 
 
 
20,45 
 
  

					
				
				
O74 1(UI 
 
 
               STATE OF ILLINOIS 
             Department of Conservation 
 
             MEMORANDUM 
 
 
                         D a t e ... ...... . . . .. .. .... ............
. .... . . .. .. 
 
 
 
S u b j e c t  -- - --- - -- -- -- - ---- -- - -- -- - -- -- -- ----- - ---
- - -- - --- - -- -- -- - -- - - -- -- - --- - - - - --- - --- - ---- ...
... .. 
 
 
 
 
 
   Pheasant Egg            Total         39,e32& 
 
 
   Pheasant s              Total          1, 500Q 
 
 
Director. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
PHEASAT EGG DIATRTUTION 0 - 192 8. 
 
 
County 
 
 
Adamrs 
Alexander 
Bond 
Boone 
Brown 
Bureau 
Calhoun 
Carroll 
Cass 
Chamuo ign 
Christian 
Clark 
Clay 
Clinton 
Coles 
Cook 
Crawford 
Cumberland 
De Kalb 
De 'itt 
Douglas 
Du Page 
Edgar 
Edwards 
Ef f ingham 
Fayette 
Ford 
Franklin 
Fulton 
Gallatin 
Greene 
Grundy 
Hamilton 
Hancock 
Hardin 
Henderson 
Henry 
Irocuois 
Jackson 
Je soer 
Jefferson 
Jersey 
Jo Daviess 
Johnson 
Kpne 
Kankakee 
 
 
Yorkv ill e 
 
  152 (3) 
 
 
 
  65 (1) 
 
 
 
  13 (1) 
  13 (1) 
  1,95 R 
  97 1) 
 
 
1,439 (4) 
 
   26 (1) 
   39 (3) 
 
 
   13 i1) 
   2 6 ý 2) 
 
   13 (1) 
 
   26 (1) 
1,200 (2) 
  156 (12) 
 
  26 (1) 
 
 
 
  325 
  195 (4) 
  78 (3) 
 
 
 
  351 (3) 
 
  139 
 
 
Alton 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26 (1) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
52 (1) 
 
 
Wagner 
 
 
78 (8) 
39 (1) 
195 (14) 
39 (3) 
13 (1) 
52 (4) 
26 (1) 
 
 
143 ý7) 
39   3) 
117 (7) 
39 (3) 
52 (3) 
39 ý2) 
 
117 (9) 
 
299 (8) 
104 (8) 
78 (4) 
247 (i16) 
91 (7) 
 
52 (3) 
104 (5) 
117 (2) 
1310 (13) 
455 (26) 
65   5) 
143 (9) 
26 (2) 
39 (3) 
221 (14) 
52 (3) 
221 (6) 
208 (10) 
553 3 (34) 
13 (1) 
 
 
130  I 
143 (9) 
273 (1-6) 
 
 
Evans 
 
 
   13 (1) 
   78 (2-) 
   52 (4) 
 
   189 (4) 
 
   39 (2) 
   52 (1) 
   429 (io) 
   26 2( 
   2 (2) 
   39 (2) 
 
   486 (3) 
1,58i (104) 
 
   26 (1) 
   494 (18) 
 
   26 (1) 
   91 (4) 
 
 
 
   24-7 (6) 
   78 (2) 
   3-5 (3) 
   156 (10) 
   39 (3) 
   78 (4) 
   351 (4) 
 
   26   1 
 
   91 (6) 
   52 (4) 
   299. (4) 
   65 (4) 
 
 
   78 (/ 
   130 (4) 
 
 
Totn4ý 
 
 
  243 
  117 
  247 
  39 
  13 
  306 
  26 
  338 
  104 
  585 
  73 
  338 
  175 
  52 
  525 
3,051 
  117 
  78 
  832 
  104 
  104 
  351 
  117 
 
  52 
  364 
  195 
  234 
1I811 
  260 
  221 
  403 
  39 
  247 
  26 
  117 
  637 
  455 
  932 
  65 
  13 
  26 
  442 
  208 
  273 
  542 
 
 
(10) 
(3) 
(18) 
(3) 
(1) 
(9) 
(1) 
(18) 
(2) 
 
 
 
 
 
(i0) 
(5) 
(6) 
 
 
 
 
(3) 
(110) 
 
() 
(8) 
(5) 
(9) 
 
(3) 
 
 
(17) 
('7) 
 
(15) 
(13) 
(20) 
(13) 
(7) 
 
 
(1) 
(4) 
 
14 
18) 
412) 
 
 
14 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
PHEASANT EGG DISTRIBUTION. 
 
 
  County       Yorkville   Alton     Wagner     Evans       Total 
Kendall         1.3 (ý4                26 (i)   126 (2)     315 (5)

Knox             13 (1                156  12)   13 (1)     182 (14) 
Lake            208 (2)               182 (13)   65 (4)     455 (19) 
LP Salle        449 (16)              117 (8)    52 (4)     618 (28) 
Lawrence        -                     312 (24)   13 (1)     325 (25) 
Lee             200 (1)               429 (31)  260 (8)     889 (40) 
Livingston      208 (2)               260 (14)   52 (1)     520 (17) 
Logan           156 (1)                26 (1)    113 (2)    295 (4) 
Macon            26 (1)     ----      130 (7)   156 (6)     312 (14) 
ýLacoupin        78 (1)     39 (1)    169 (12)   195 (,)    431 (20)

Madison          65 (3)     13 (1)    169 (12)   117 (7)    364 (23) 
Marion          390 (1)     ----      152 (4)     13 (1)    455 (6) 
Marshall        169 (2)               i 30 10)   91 ()      390 (18) 
Mason                      260-(1)                          260 (1, 
.ýassac         ....13                    (i)     13 (1)     26 (2)

ýc DOnough      ...                   507 (38)    65 (5)    572 (43)

"'*c Henry      495 (2)     ----       52 (4)    91 (4)     638 (10)

ic Lean         .......                91 (7)    195 (10)   286  (17) 
Menard          ---        247 (1)     --.---               247 (1) 
iercer          .......                78 (5)    600 (1)    678 (6) 
Lonroe          ---                    13 (1)    494 (32)   507  33) 
onhtgomery      ---         52 (4)    ---        78 (3)     130 (7) 
Morgan          ---                   117 (4)    ---        117 (4) 
Youltrie        600 (2)     ----       26 (2)               626 (4) 
Ogle            377 (3)     ----      208 (1Z)   ---        585 (16) 
Peoria          226 (3)     ----      182 (9)    52 (4)     460 (13) 
Perry           --                    156 (9)    260 (1)    416 (10) 
Piatt            26 (1)                65  5)    100 (1)    191 (7) 
Pike            360 (2)     ---65 (2)            169 (13)   594  (17) 
Po-e ---                              130  7)    ---        130   7 
Pulaski         ----                  143 (6)     39 (1)    18 ~7 
Putnnn          ---                    52  4)     13(1       65 
Randolph        -------9(4                        78 (1'19l5 
Richlnd9 150 (1)                      234  5)     13 (1     13979 
Rock Island     ---         26 (1)    130  8)     65 (1)    221 (1 
Saline          234 (18)    ----                 234 (5)    468 (23) 
Sangamon        416 (3)                13 (1)    499 (17)   928 (21) 
Schuyler         13 (1)                13 (1)     39 (3)     65 (5) 
Scott           ---         52 (1)                65 (4)    117  (5) 
Shelby                      ----                  91 (6,     91  (6 
Stark           ---                               13 1)      123 15 
St. Clair       ---                   260 (13)    52 2i     31    ib 
Stephenson      221 (3)      ....                130 9      351  12 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
-3- 
 
 
PHEASANT EGG DISTRIBUTION. 
 
 
County 
 
 
Tazewell 
Union 
Vermilion 
WSbash 
Wprren 
W4'shington 
Wayne 
White 
Whiteside 
Will 
Williamson 
Winnebago 
Woodford 
 
 
Yorkville 
 
  299 (3) 
 
  676 (3) 
 
  13 (1) 
 
 
1,825 (2) 
  734 (5) 
  400 (2) 
 
 
13,972 (145) 
 
 
Alton 
 
 
130 () 
 
 
 
 
 
13 (1) 
 
 
260 (1) 
 
 
1,170 (15) 
 
 
Wagner 
 
 
Total 
 
 
              637 (18)   1,066  (2-2) 
   ---        104 (a)      104   8) 
              143 (II)     819  (14) 
   ---        351 (27)    351   (27) 
              585 (19)    598   (ao) 
   ---        195 (14)    195   (14) 
   ---        143 (7)     143   (7) 
   26 (1)     182 (13)    221   (15) 
   ---        117 (9)   1,942   (11) 
   13 (1)     741 (28) 1,488    (32) 
   ---        221 (12)    481   (13) 
               39 (3)     439   (5) 
   ---        455 (15)    455   (15) 
 
10,023 (599L4,112 (583)39,277   (1342) 
           S<                / 
 
 
Items in oarentheses indicate numbOers of individual consignments. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
December 30, 
 
 
County 
 
 
   orkv i 1 e 
Crates Birds 
 
 
A dwi s. ......... ...... 
Alexander ........... 
Bond  .. ....9.9 ..9 
Boone 
Brown 
Bureau 
Calhoun ............. 
Carroll ........... .. 
Cass ................ 
Champaign ........... 
Christian ........... 
Clark 
Clay 
Clinton ............. 
Coles ....9 .......... 
Cook ....... . .9 9 .. 
Crawford ............ 
Ci-mberland 
De Ka3b  999999999..99 
De itt . . 
Douglas ............. 
Du Page .......... .. 
Edgar 
Edwards ............. 
Iffinghbam ........... 
Fayette . ............ 
Ford .9999.9.999.9... 
Franklin ............ 
Filton 
Gal latin ............ 
Greene .............. 
 
Hamilton ............ 
Hancock 
Hardin  9999..999.999. 
Henderson 999..9..999 
Henry  ........... .. ... 
Iroquois 
Jackson 999    ,.. 9,9 
Jasper 
Jefferson ........... 
Jersey 9............. 
Jo Daviess .99..9.9.. 
Johnson ........9  . 
Kane  9oo... 9..... .... 
Kankakee ...... . .... 
Kendall ............. 
Knox *...  .......... 
Lake ................ 
La Salle ............ 
Lawrence 9     . 
Lee 
Livingston .......... 
 
 
3 
2 
3 
 
4 
 
 
 
10 
2 
 
1 
 
 
16 
 
 
6 
 
 
 
2 
 
6 
37 
6 
 
 
 
24 
 
 
5 
6 
5 
4 
3 
 
 
5 
3 
1 
3 
1 
4 
 
 
DI S.2P 1UTI' I . 
 
 
      Alton 
   Crates Birds 
 
 
3 
4 
 
 
1 
 
 
  Distribution 
Crates   Birds 
 
 
6 
6 
 
3 
2 
4 
 
 
50 
 
 
4 
2 
 
 
1 
4 
 
1 
2 
 
1 
4 
 
 
1 
 
 
6 
6 
 
6 
12 
6 
 
4 
 
 
22 
6 
 
 
52 
 
6 
37 
6 
 
 
15 
4 
1 
 
4 
11 
1 
2 
5 
7 
8 
6 
3 
 
 
50 
 
 
24 
 
 
28 
44 
6 
30 
 
6 
6 
12 
4 
 
25 
 
 
6 
 
4 
I 
 
4 
 
 
 
2 
1 
 
1 
 
 
5     25 
 
 
2 
 
 
 
 
2 
 
6 
3 
3 
3 
9 
ii 
3 
2 
2 
 
 
1 
1 
 
 
1 
 
 
21 
 
 
16 
 
1 
15 
13 
 
 
13 
16 
 
 
400 
 
 
45 
 
12 
416 
 
  1 
  15 
  13 
 
 
  13 
  16 
 
 
2 
 
1 
6 
4 
3 
2 
9 
11 
4 
3 
2 
 
 
1 
 
 
Phi'ý SA "--,I 
 
  

					
				
				
 
2.     County      Yorkville     Alton         Distribution 
                 Crates Birds  Crates Birds   Crates Birds. 
 
 
Lgan  .   .1                    2                    3 
Macon ............. 5           1                    6 
facoupin *..... *.     15       5   95          5  110 
adson *.... *....... *125       1               1  137 
Varion .............. 10 6                     11   30 
?arsha II............ 3 3                      3     3 
Wason ............... 1                                     1 
1 as1sa             1                                     1 
Wc Donougi ...5 .....   55 
c Herry .,. .......... 4                                      4 
e Len .. ........... 2 18                       2   18 
,enard 
r~ereer *~~9S~e*5                                                      5

,'onroe ..............  1       1               1     1 
Vontgomery ........** 3         4                    7 
Worgan 
Moultrie ............ 5                                      5 
Ogle . ................ 3 4                     3     4 
Peoria .............. 2 4                       2     4 
Perry . . ............. 1 3          4          1     7 
Piatt .. ....... ......         11             11 
Pike ................ 4                                      4 
Pope ,.. * ..... .. . ,         3                    2 
Pulaski ............. 6 20      3               9   30 
Putnam .. ........ . 2                                      2 
Randolph ............ 2  2      1               3   50 
Richland ........               6                    6 
Rock Island ....... 7  12                       7   12 
Saline ,........... 5   6                       5   38 
Sangamon ..., ...... 3 30                       3   30 
Schuyler .. ......... 
Scott w .... .. . . . 1         2                    3 
Shelby o ........... . 2                                      2 
Stark                                           1.... ... .. i          
                           1 
St. Clair ........... 4 8       2  608          6  276 
Stephenson o ...... .. 1 1                      1     1 
Tazewell ............ 1 12      3               4   12 
Union ............. ,                               12 
Vermilion ..,,....... 2 2       2               4     2 
WIaba sh .............. 2                                     2 
17arren , ........... 2 10      1               3   10 
Washington .......... 1                                     1 
-yne . #12 
White ...............           2                    2 
Whiteside .......... 3                                     3 
il    .......... ..~...* 5 117                      11 
71illiamson ........ 3          3               6   24 
Winnebago .. ......... 4                                      4 
Woodford ............ 3 11                      3   11 
 
 
555      87 1,207 
 
 
326 1,762 
 
 
TOTAL 
 
 
239 
 
  

					
				
				
 
ALL AGREEMENTS ARE CONTINGENT UPON STRIKES. FIRE, FLOOD, ACCIDENTSOR OTHER

         CONDITIONS UNAVOIDABLE OR BEYOND OUR CONTROL. 
 
       ADDRESS ALL CORRESPONDENCE TO THE COMPANY. 
 
 
 
 
 
                  MANUFACTURERS 
       WE S"TiERN AMMNUNI" T I ON 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                mTiAf NI. I 1 i 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7      :NTALTON, ILL 
 
 
0M-i , 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alfred -L G~wes   1Qt 
 
Gerg Lynn, bRatb 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Sh, ha 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Earl Ames 
Hermen W. Korsmeyer 
 
Carthage Lake Clu, Burlington, 
  Iowa 
New Crystal Lake Club, Burlington, 
  Iowa 
Treadway Rod & Gun Club, Daven- 
  port, Iowa 
Paddy Island H. Club, Burlington, 
  I owa 
Peter Friedrich, Havana 
 
Harry MC0arty, Topeka 
 
ILeo H. Borgelt, Havana 
 
H.E.Hoag & Neil Metcalf,Momence 
Coontail Gun Club, MeUedosia 
 
Eugene Edes & 3 others, Delaven 
 
John C. Sohulte, Havana 
 
Roy tatthews, Bluff Springs 
 
0. C. Gruybb, Springfield 
 
Martin Reinel, Chicego 
 
Chas. Squire & Chas. Walker, 
  Topeka 
Tri City Gun Club, Beardstown 
 
George t Wheeler, Putnam 
L.A.England, MgrH , E.Point Club, 
  Havana 
Elmer darren, Easton 
 
 
HW.           Prt., d    le 
 
 
 
 
 
   .t., Pekin 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lewistown 
 
Arenzville 
L. M. Pilger, Sec., Burlington,Ia. 
 
R. R. Burns, Sec., Burli.gtonIa. 
 
P. beeni-lxen, Sec., L.E.Treadway, Supt. 
  .Beardstown, Ill. 
 
Fred Sheagren, 312 Wash. St., 
Burlington, Iowa 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
W.E.Boyd, Pres., Meredosia 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3116 Lawrence Ave., 
 
 
LI VýhjKNIt 
 
  

					
				
				
 
C   QY 
 
 
C, . fLetivv 16-Isn. ý 1~1a1 
 
 
 
 
A. 1. kvh     a4 
 
 
 
 
A,~ T.      ýood~r 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
      Pua 
Arthu & rJ drih  9".01onk 
 
 
 
 
Jt. C. ,uua, '1vt4.r 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
K. A. v tZ 
 
 
   SS      r  V 
 
BleAA-     cub ereA 
 
Jals          A 
 
 
Go*. Narbieht, Pr*.. ,N 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John tavent, "K~--e 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          Maflin, P ýe.  Plymoth 
 
  

					
				
				
 
D          Q F 4iS 
 
 
ROY"Olv lw  :,awntRl 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3tftnr ton t Asn  iý4ý 
 
 
 
 
ft11ovia l   o  11-tn  -ýO 
 
 
 
 
 
blue ta. l $m Ir, htý4k 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lete Reple A. 4W. Oi 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Oltv roon. f f i, *4 r~k ove 
 
 
 
son i 1,alreh 
 
 
J. C.  To ion  ,ýioj C-.A, 
T.DL. Vw,ýn 61 J t-.6   ý01. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4." *0k4kJ,,     Ar.4s 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
F. J. Tot L6., tiv 
 
 
 
 
 
Lk r - ý n  *x ,$ 
J. Yt. t t,        A. 
,;k  i 
 
 
J 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
0. R. -noaaA          t 
 
Pp~t~e 0-.nCu~b# 
 
 
A 1roW P. Anderso,  n 
1157 "Ilw 
 
 
 
 
John~   naber , roezt Cit 
 
L~ .  flto iWar  ne 
 
 
 
 
 
P!ler     j 
 
 
Curles Attun lu, P'-mori 
 
 
 
 
 
QNau , Q-ot um clu, O3kv ýrdcmhw 
 
 
 
Joh L. ni-ay, ,14dr 
Allo ,ln lb 6rwil 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    L flit 
O'ed1rs Gan Uu, 8#1ownmt 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
bmre & S  1w,? .&d    o, 
 
 
  Om    N, 
 
 
P., VL. ;.J   7 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    a~~~a$r t#41O. l';tO 
 
 
0ý0 r. w,? m   1  w f 
 
  

					
				
				
 
JL I 
 
 
Ouk Z.1&xn ii &AY. Clb, Nw1rit 
 
  SRiver Gm .'Olb, Lwrlstm,ý 
 
 
 
 
 
  bic-,~          t tS  t 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  LsknIubk , ots".u 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ThS-4t .Rb.R  01U, OhicAý' 
 
 
 
 
 
Jor!Rn Q. YI-tor,  to,33  'Suy4. 
 
Jue' ý    19401w.ntqy. 
 
 
 
 
   chiokotAe  u,  rI 
 
 
xCr.mw Ave.,,"icg 
 
 
 
op, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
. A.      Rs. OO- M. 
 
 
 
 
 
   14rl-rb F 4,., F?*Il 
 
 fntý.  cl*1. ý-t r  o 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 jea* Z". Ie 
 
 
 
 
 
 
      ýrle t 'r k- 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
fla Mk ¥.a. Al l* ¶~B 
Villa 
North-?ctt Om  olubt fj. ?1? Ine 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rgfr  Rrar Ao)- ;i  lb 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ýýjxwnJo  Ol , Gv ru 
Peki kd & Q Clu, Nki 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
motbtibr e  m  ('ub 
 
 
  i.  L. NLxt1A , M~f~vrr 
 
 
 
S.aro Lqk .ýn Azt.U, Jiiz 
 
 
 
   Uicel ~ice ~m lu, Mtowla 
 
 
 
 
 
A.trvo W&, kluntine A kb, 
 
 
Jlekýl Co4kr Paorlvb Nk 
 
 
A * .   . tlR, ,   ,~~dvl 
 
 
            30Z  L*,  p it 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
,.          .. 10 L O 
 
 
 
 
!    a. Jr ll . 4A ni A. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
0.U *gl  e.,   at.p 
     at in ýýt  4100ifb. outnl W. 
   Ol4oT  aýo  + ~sl 
   .Sea, 
 
 
rol 7Aute: Nork. OottteeofjO 
 
 
",i;4j% QL%ý (,4 or    1iW1 
       1 4 o 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
v 
 
 
i-. A. J.n~t~hsma  *~ 
 
ý410- Jonson,  ff1 
 
 
Aý,*F~ V*1OmMibt, V1*l pVpIoa 
 
 
 
 
     l4 uns Olububnll 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
fria~l Gutn cw lubs ot'ol 
 
Nepnae tua Club,, !N.r.<1Lftk 
 
 
 
 
Peki Juck i7ub Pekin1. A~ 
 
 
 
 
 
 
,41n ~4 & ua WQub,, ýln 
 
 
 
 
fTaz CityOunClu, Laos 
 
 
,        t. pu 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ft. A, bh, o., 
 
 
 
J*Qt 3w0 e. V 
c/o .pr , ti o.,  ,  tola 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
F. ipt  , Pre&.$ 
 
 
 
 
 
t L. Oth, lo., 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
i, AI 
Ho.r  "A11,  ýýG.,  vi 
 
 
)1ýe~o.i U II X ;v   ý 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
V 
 
 
  ~Rbr. at 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
0416 Rsled C lub,      .. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
v. 11,1 
 
 
 
 
 
J.L.  0140, B*4.tw 
 
 
 
 
F. r. Jh 
   Allos ff ating tKV 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   8B4 ht, *b  I 
 IAp~.ta -A.w, 
 Fre A.Fr. Monr, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          dantid, Ussiltos 
 
Olsd W.v d Club,, Xrlord 
 
 
   7.00- A.S W.e 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
kýýIC'Z3 to  Uwove  4a~y 
 
 
Temia Adg., $syil P~di~nebvlasa., 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Oo'0. 4, qoU~ 337 Varnt ""A.0 
  51we £slaai& 
 
 
WE, t.Alien, pr...    Neorls 
 
  

					
				
				
 
  ¶14 QU 0? 1LRZ# 
 
1ft - 
 
 
JL 
Dw trol T11.~ ff.IIW Cm#Cil 
 
 
- 
 
 
&        & Clu ,, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ot. r. A hta,  J 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Z. JAzff &     Cit 
bru   O°a Club, 
0*. h. fLov#pt? & l*, kt 
 
 
 
 
 
  Sut    ob, L41  lp~rt 
 
 
Mr,    tr, J,        441 
   O I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
l.   Xeu , 6c, Vermont 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Petrk. L,  yar, N 
 
  

					
				
				
 
LICENSED HUNTING CLUBS OF ILLINOIS 
 
           1928-1929 
 
 
Homer Coleman, Walter Hood & 
   Fred Cline 
 John W. Johnson 
 
 Simon Hohenstein 
 A. E. Hutchisomn 
 
 Chas. C. Hartwig 
 
 I-ster Barlow & 
   Elmer Harford 
 
 George Hall 
 
 Ray Hampton 
 
 Earnest 0est 
 
 Duck Slough Club, Rushville 
 
 Pecan Grove Gun Club, Chandler- 
   ville 
 Silver Lake H. & F. Club, 
   Burlington, Iowa 
 Andrew R. Gilmore, 
 
 Mike Basso 
 
 J. D. Taylor 
 Everett Buster 
 
 Mallard Gun Club, Bureau 
 Chillicothe H. Club., Chillicothe 
 
 Wabash Gun Club, Naples 
 
 Louis Moser, Tremont 
 
 Pete Harshman, 
 Willow Lodge Gun Club, Lomax 
 
 George J. Bauman, 
 
 Burlington Island Club, Henderson 
 
 Leonard Lane 
 
 The Cartwright H. Club, Spfld. 
 
 Frank Shakelford 
 
 A. S. Clemmns 
 Carthage H. & F. Club, Carthage 
 
 Dick Osing 
 
 Fred Bestman 
 
 C. C. Himmel & H.F.Deverman 
 
Roseville Rodd& Gun ClubRose- 
  ville 
 
 
Besrdstown 
 
  Saidora 
  Mokena 
 
  Morris 
  Chicago 
 
 
  Bedford 
 
  Beardstown 
  Havana 
 
  Bath 
 
  John C. Graff, Secy., Rushville 
 
  J. E. Armstrong,Pres., Chandler- 
  ville 
 
  R. T. Dietlein 
 
  Mason City 
2011 E.Vash St., Springfield 
 
Saidora 
 
Peoria 
 
John Weeks, Sec., Bureau 
 
Fred J. Larchn, Pres., Chillicothe 
 
J. E. Stumpf, Sec., Naples 
 
 
Rockport 
L.R. Bolick, Lomax 
 
Chenoa 
 
W. T. Doughty, Henderson 
 
Saidora 
 
J . Hry Hane, SY C23e ., Sprn feld 
 
Carrollton 
 
Saidore 
 
R. D. Denton, Sec., Carthage 
 
Bath 
 
Des Plaines 
 
Topeka 
 
W.A.Lee, Sec., Roseville 
 
  

					
				
				
 
LICENSED HUNTING CLUBS OF ILLINOIS 
 
            1928-1929 
 
 
J. E. Knapp 
 
Amos Robinson 
 
Hlrman Koke 
 
San Jose Gun Club, San Jose 
 
Mueller Land Improvement 
  Trust & Mueller Co.,Decatur 
 
Cascade F. & H. Club, Burlington, 
  Iowa 
 
John G. Friedrich 
 
Marion Co. H. & F. Club, 
  Centralia 
 
Allegheny Gun Club, Chicago 
 
 
Cyprus Grace 
 
Fred Poor & Mervin Barnes, 
  Bellview 
 
John A. Herring 
 
 
Jacksonville 
 
Pittsfield 
 
Bath 
 
Roscoe Smith, Pres., San Jose 
 
 
Robt. Mueller, V-Pres., Decatur 
 
 
 
Havana 
 
0. B. Rettinghouse, Sec., 
Centralia 
 
By Geo. G. Leibrandti Lincoln 
State Bank, Chicago 
 
Miller City 
 
 
Saidora 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
       SYNOPSIS OF A BILL FOR AN ACT IN RELATION TO THE ACQUISITION 
SESTABLIJS .ENT BY THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, OF A STATE-WIDE SYSTEM 
OF CONUERVATION AND FOREST PRESERVES AND PUBLIC RECREATION G 
AND THE PROVISION OF MEANS FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE COST THEOT, BY 
AN ISSUE OF BONDS OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 
 
       $14,000,000.00 thirty year Bonds at not to exceed 4l% interest. 
 
       Not to exceed $1,400,000.00 per year to be issued or sold. 
 
       No bonds to be issued until there is a surplus of $750,000.00 
in the Bond Issue retirement fund. 
       If surplus is sufficient to do away with the necessity for 
selling Bonds in any year the surplus may be used and the Bonds pro- 
vided for in that year shall be cancelled. 
 
       The Department of Conservation to acquire an average of 2000 
acres of upland in each county where possible. 
 
       The Department also to purchase 80,000 acres as nearly as 
may be of river bottom or marshland. 
 
       The average price for all land not to exceed $50.00 per acre 
if possible. 
 
       The lands shall be chosen for their scenic beauty, avail- 
ability for general recreational purposes, suitability for re- 
forestation and forest purposes, propagation of wild life and suit- 
ability for fishing and hunting purposes. 
 
       25% of the land shall be set aside for sanctuaries for song 
and game birds and shall be reforested. 
 
       10% to be set aside for general recreation for Boy Scouts, 
and similar organizations and Civic and Church organizations and 
camping and picnicking for all individuals. 
       No hunting or fishing aJllowed on this 35%. 
 
       The remaining 65% of lands shall be open to any person holding 
a hunting or fishing license for hunting and fishing. 
 
       Provides for a Conservation and Public Recreation Board of 
seven members to advise with and assist the Deatment of onser- 
vation in selecting land and carrying out all provisions of this Act. 
The term of office is so arranged that a majority of this board holds 
over from one administration to the next. 
 
       One prominent banker, 
       One prominent member of organized labor, 
       One person prominent in forestry and 
               reforestation work, 
       One active member of some organization 
               interested in public playgzrounds, 
       One member of farmerts organization, 
       Two prominent sportsmen. 
 
       The Department of Conservation shall have full charge of these 
lands for reforestation, development of recreation grounds and other 
necessary management or development. 
       Provides for the usual legal requirements as to the issuing 
of the Bonds and method of paying for the land. 
       Provides for annual report to the Governor by the Director of 
Conservation. 
       Provides that monies derived from sale of licenses for hunt- 
ing, fishing, etc., shall be used to retire the Bonds and pay the 
interest, but if the funds are not sufficient then a tax shall be 
levied for this purpose. 
 
       Provides for submitting the proposition to a referendum in 
November 1930, showing the form of the ballot. 
       Provides for publication in newspapers in different sections 
of the State. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
HOUSE BILL NO. 570. APPROVED JUNE 26, 1929. 
 
 
       AN ACT IN RELATION TO THE ACQUISITION AND ESTABLISHMENT BY 
THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, OF A STATE-WIDE SYSTEM OF CONSERVATION AND 
FOREST PRESERVES AND PUBLIC RECREATION GROUNDS, AND THE PROVISION 
OF MEANS FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE COST THEREOF BY AN ISSUE OF BONDS 
OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 
 
       BE IT ENACTED BY THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, 
REPRESENTED IN THE GENERAL ASSEIBLY: 
 
       SECTION 1. A State-wide system of conservation and forest 
preserves and public recreation grounds shall be acquired and es- 
tablished by the State of Illinois, and the State of Illinois (Act- 
ing through its officers), is authorized and empowered to issue, 
sell and provide for the retirement of bonds of the State of 
Illinois to the amount of fourteen million dollars ($14,000,000.00) 
for the purpose of paying the cost of acquiring and establishing the 
State-wide system of conservation and forest preserves and public 
recreation grounds. Before this law which authorizes the debt to be 
contracted and levies the tax for the payment of the principal and 
interest of the bonds to be issued as an evidence of the debt, shall 
go into force and effect, it shall be submitted to the people at the 
general election in NovemberI A. D. 1930, and receive a majority of 
the votes cast for members of the General Assembly at such election. 
       2. The State-wide system of conservation and forest pre- 
serves and public recreation grounds shall be composed of all fish- 
ing and hunting grounds and of all fish and game preserves, refuges, 
rest grounds and sanctuaries now owned by the State of Illinois, and 
of tracts of land to be acquired in various places throughout the 
State, under the provisions of this Act. 
       The Department of Conservation shall acquire as nearly as may 
be, an average of 2,000 acres of upland in each county in the State. 
Land lying along or traversed by a stream of water which is elevated 
and dry except for the channel of such stream may be acquired as up- 
land. The department shall also purchase 80,000 acres, as nearly as 
may be, of lowlands, land commonly known as river bottom and/or 
marsh land. Both upland and lowland shall be purchased at an aver- 
age price of not to exceed $50.00 per acre, if possible. 
        The lands acquired under the provisions of this Act shall be 
 chosen for their scenic beauty, their availability for general rec- 
 reational purposes, their suitability for reforestation and forest 
 purposes and the propagation of wild life and their suitability for 
 fishing and hunting purposes. 
        3. Of the lands acquired under the provisions of this Act: 
        1. 25% shall be set aside as sanctuaries for song and game 
 birds and wild animals, and for fish hatcheries and preserves, and 
 shall be reforested. 
        2. 10% shall be set aside as camping, including tourist 
 camps, hiking, picnicking and general outdoor recreational grounds; 
 and 
        3. The remaining 65% of such lands shall be open to the 
 public for fishing and hunting in accordance with the "Fish Code of

 Illinois" and the "Game Code of Illinois" except that trapping
is 
 prohibited. 
        The lands so set aside as sanctuaries for song and game birds 
 and wild anirdals, and as camping, hiking, picnicking and general out- 
 door recreational grounds shall not be used for hunting, fishing or 
 trapping purposes, nor shall any hunting, fishing or trapping be 
 permitted therein, except that the department may destroy any pre- 
 datory or destructive animals or birds on such land, or remove rough 
 or undesirable fish from preserves. 
        The lands so set aside as sanctuaries for song and game birds 
 and wild animals and to be reforested shall be handled by the de- 
 partment in accordance with the most approved methods of forestry 
 having due regard for the conservation and propagation of game. 
        The department may devote not to exceed one hundred acres 
 of each one thousand acres of the land acquired under the provisions 
 of this Act to the production of grain suitable for feed for song 
 and game birds and for wild animals. The department may do the work 
 necessary to produce this grain or may lease this land to others 
 who will produce the grain for a grain rent that is customary in 
 the locality. 
        No part of the lands .open to the public for fishing and hunt- 
 ing may be leased except for the production of grain as above pro- 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
-2- 
 
 
vided but the Department of Conservation may lease a portion of the 
land set aside for general recreation to associations or organ- 
izations organized for humanitarian purposes and not for profit, as 
Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Catholic Boys Brigade, church and civic 
clubs, farm bureaus and labor organizations and like organizations, 
for a nominal rental of not to exceed five dollars per annum and 
for a term of not to exceed five years, but not more than five acres 
shall be leased to any one group or organization. All moneys so re- 
ceived shall be paid into the conservation and public recreation 
fund in the State treasury. 
       The Department of Conservation may close not to exceed 25% 
of the lands open to the public for fishing and hunting for a period 
of not to exceed one y~ear and prohibit fishing and hunting therein 
during such period in order to permit fish and game to propagate. 
       4. The issuance, sale and retirement of the bonds and the 
acquisition and establishment of the State-wide system of conserva- 
tion and forest preserves and public recreation grounds, and every- 
thing incidental thereto, shall be under the general supervision 
and control of the Department of Conservation, subject to the 
approval of the Governor. The Department of Conservation is author- 
ized, empowered and directed to take whatever steps may be necessary 
to cause the bonds to be issued and sold and to cause the State-wide 
system of conservation and forest preserves and public recreation 
grounds to be acquired and established. 
       There is hereby create an advisory board to be known as the 
conservation and public recreation board consisting of seven members 
to be appointed by the Governor with the consent of the Senate. Of 
the members of this board, one shall be a prominent banker, one a 
prominent member of organized labor, one a person prominent in for- 
estry and reforestation work, one an active member of some organ- 
ization interested in public playgrounds or other like recreational 
grounds, one a prominent farmer and two persons who are prominent 
sportsmen, of this State. 
       Of the members of such board first appointed two shall be 
appointed for a term of two Nears, two for a term of four years and 
three for a term of six years from the third Monday in January, 1931, 
and until their successors are appointed and qualified. Thereafter 
their successors shall hold for a term of six years.  The Governor 
may remove any member of this board at any time for failure to 
carry out the duties herein imposed or for any other misconduct in 
office. The members of this board shall receive a per tiem of not 
to exceed ten dollars per day and shall be reimbursed for their 
actual expenses incurred while performing their duties under this 
Act. None of the members of such special board shall be an em- 
ployee of the State nor shall any member be interested, directly 
or indirectly, in the sale of any property acquired under the pro- 
visions of this Act. If any such member is interested in the sale 
of any property so acquired, the contract for the purchase of such 
property shall-be void and any conveyance executed in furtherance 
thereof shall be voidable at the option of the Department of Con- 
servation. 
       This conservation and public recreation advisory board shall 
have the power and it shall be its duty: 
        To advise with the Department of Conservation and to assist 
 the department in selecting land to be acquired, in the management 
 and development of these lands, in determining which portions shall 
 be set aside for sanctuaries and reforestation, and for public rec- 
 reation grounds, in formulating rules and regulations governing the 
 use and occupancy of these lands, and in carrying out all of the 
 provisions of this Act. 
        5. For the purpose of raising the sum necessary to carry out 
 the provisions of this Act, bonds of the State of Illinois to an 
 amount n6t exceeding the sum of fourteen million dollars (014,000,000 
 00) shall be issued and sold as herein provided. The bonds shall 
 bear interest, payable semi-annually, from the date of their issue, 
 at the rate of three and one-half per centum per annum, unless 
 financial conditions make a different rate advisable, in which case 
 the Department of Conservation may, with the Governor's approval, 
 issue part or all of the bonds at any other rate of interest not ex- 
 ceeding four per centum per annum. The bonds sh%ll be serial bonds 
 and be dated, issue and sold from time to time as the establishment 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
-3- 
 
 
o-f the State-wide system of conservation and forest preserves and 
public recreation grounds progresses, and in such amounts as may be 
necessary to provide sufficient money to carry out the provisions 
of this Act, except that bonds for an amount in excess of one million 
four hundred thousand dollars shall not be issued and sold during any 
one year; PROVIDED HOWEVER, that the first sale of bonds shall not be 
made until there is a balance or surplus of at least seven hundred 
fifty thousand dollars in the conservation and public recreation fund. 
       Each bond shall be in the denomination of five hundred dollars 
($500.00), or some multiple thereof, ind shall be made payable with- 
in thirty years from date. The bonds shall be engraved and printed 
by the Department of Purchases and Construction, under the direction 
of the Governor and he-signed by the Governor and attested by the 
Secretary of State, under the seal of the State, and countersigned by 
the State Treasurer and by the Auditor of Public Accounts. The bonds 
shall be deposited, until sold, with the State Treasurer; and when 
sold, the proceeds shall be paid into the State treasury and become 
a part of the State bond conservation and public recreation fund, 
       6. In any year in which the current revenue or accumulated 
surplus is sufficient to make unnecessary the selling of all or any 
part of the bonds to be sold in that year, such bonds may be returned 
to the State treasury marked cancelled if an amount of such revenue 
or surplus equal to the amount of the bonds so cancelled is used for 
the purchase of land as provided in this Act. 
       7. The Department of Conservation shall have the care, control, 
 supervision and management of the State-wide system of conservation 
 and forest preserves and public recreation grounds, and its officers 
 and such of its employees as the director may designate, are vested 
 with police powers for the enforcement of the laws of the State and 
 the rules and regulations of the department. 
        8. The Department of Conservation, in addition to the other 
powers vested in it by this Act, is empowered: 
        1. To receive lands by donation or devise for the State-wide 
 system of conservation and forest oreservos and public recreation. 
        2. To make and enforce rules and regulations for the use, 
 care, improvement, control and administration of the State-wide sys- 
 tem of conservation and forest preserves and public recreation 
 grounds. 
        3. To lay out, construct and maintain roads, trails, bridges, 
 camp sites, shelters, houses, and other reasonably necessary or con- 
 venient improvements. 
        9. All payments for land purchased or obligations incurred 
 under the provisions of this Act Shall be made by the State Treasurer 
 out of the State bond conservation and public recreation fund upon 
 warrants drawn by the Auditor of Public Accounts, based upon bills 
 of particulars and vouchers certified by the proper official of the 
 Department of Conservation having knowledge of the facts upon which 
 such vouchers are based, and audited and approved by the Director of 
 Conservation and approved by the Governor, acting through the De- 
 partment of Finance. 
        10. The Department of Conservation shall, on or before the 
 first day of February of each year, make a full report to the Gov- 
 ernor of all business transacted by the department in carrying out 
 the provisions of this Act during the year ending on the preceding 
 thirty-first day of December. The Governor may cause the books and 
 affairs of said department relating to the work provided for herein, 
 to be audited in each year. 
        11. The money in the conservation and public recreation fund 
 created by and under the provisions of "An Act to revise the law in

 relation to the conservation of fish, mussels, fro-s and turtles in 
 the State of Illinois, and to provide penalties for the violation 
 thereof and to repeal all Acts in conflict with this Act," approved

 June 30, 1923, as amended, and "An Act to revise the law in relation

 to the conservation of game, wild animals, wild fowls and birds in 
 the State of Illinois, and to provide penalties for the violation 
 thereof, and to repeal all Acts in conflict with this Act", approved

 June 30, 1923, as amended, shall first be appropriated and used for 
 the purpose of paying and discharging the principal and interest on 
 the bonded indebtedness, herein provided for, then due and payable. 
 Each year after this Act becomes fully operative and until all of 
 said bonds shall have become retired, there shall be included in and 
 added to the tax levied for State purposes, a direct annual tax for 
 such amount as shall be necessary and sufficient to pay the interest 
 
  

					
				
				
 
-4- 
 
 
as it shall accrue, on each and every bond issued under the pro- 
visions of this Act, and also to pay and discharge the principal 
of such bonds at par value, as such bonds respectively'fall due; 
and the respective amounts of such direct annual tax shall be 
appropriated for that specific purpose. The required rate of such 
direct annual tax shall be fixed each year by the officers charged 
by law with fixing the rate for State taxes on the valuation of 
real and personal property in this State subject to taxation, in 
accordance with the provisions of the Statute in such cases. How- 
ever, if money from other sources of revenue has been appropraited 
and set apart for the same purpose for which said direct annual 
tax is hereby levied and imposed, then said officers shall, in fix- 
ing said rate of said direct annual tax, make proper allowance and 
reduction for any such money so appropraited and set apart from 
other sources of revenue. Said direct annual tax shall be, and it 
is hereby levied and imposed as herein provided, and such direct 
annual tax shall be assessed, levied and coflected in the same 
manner prescribed by law in the case of general State taxes, and 
shall be paid into the treasury of the State by the officers 
legally entrusted with the duty of collecting and accounting for. 
general State taxes. No such direct annual tax, however, shall be 
levied for any year in which a sufficient amount of money from 
other sources of revenue has been appropriated and set ap!rt to 
pay the interest qs it shall accrue on smid bonds for that year 
and also to pay and discharge the principal of any of said bonds 
falling due during such year. 
        12. This Act authorizing the State to contract the debt 
 for the purchase set forth herein, and as an evidence of such debt, 
 to issue bonds of the State of Illinois to the amount of fourteen 
 million dollars (ql4,000,000.00) and providing that in case other 
 sources of revenue are sufficient no direct tax shall be levied 
 but in case such other sources of revenue are insufficient any 
 deficiency shall be raised by a direct annual tax and levying a 
 direct annuaol tax sufficient to pay the interest on such bonds, as 
 such interest shall accrue, and also to pay and discharge the 
 principal of such bonds at par value, as such bonds respectively 
 fall due, but providing that such payments may be first made from 
 other sources of revenue, shall be submitted to the People of this 
 State at the general election to be held on Tuesday next after the 
 first Monday of November, A. D. 1930; said Act shall be so sub- 
 mitted on a separate ballot, which shall be in substantially the 
 following form: 
 
 
(STATE-WIDE SYSTEM OF CONSERVATION AND FOREST 
          PRESERVES AND PUBLIC RECREATION 
                 GROUNDS BALLOT) 
 
 
Shall an Act of the General Assembly of Illinois 
entitled, "An Act in relation to the acquisition 
and establishment by the State of Illinois of a 
State-wide system of conservation and forest pre- 
serves and public recreation grounds, and the pro- 
visions of means for the payment of the cost there- 
of by P n issue of bonds of the State of Illinois," 
which in substance provides for the acquisition and 
establishment by the State of Illinois, acting 
through its Department of Conservation, upon rec- 
ommendation of a special board of seven members, 
subject to the Governor's approval, of a State-wide 
system of conservation and forest preserves and pub- 
lic recreation grounds; sets aside 25% of such 
grounds for sanctuaries for song and game birds and 
wild animals and, to be reforested: 10% of such 
grounds for camping, hiking, picnicking and general 
outdoor recreational purposes, the remainder to be 
open for fishing and hunting; gives the Department 
full power to execute the Act; provides for control, 
maintenance and regulation; authorizes the State to 
contract a debt for such purpose and to issue 
tl4,000,000,00 of serial bonds, bearing interest at 
not to exceed four per cent, not more than $1,400,000 
00 worth of such bonds to be sold in any fiscal year; 
 
 
YES 
 
 
NO0 
 
 
NO 
 
  

					
				
				
 
-5- 
 
 
       This question shall be so submitted at said election, and an 
election on this question shall be held and returns thereof shall 
be ml.de, where not otherwise provided herein, at the same time and 
in the same manner and by the same officials as in the case of the 
election of State officers nd in accord.nce, as near as may be, 
with the provisions, of the -eneral election laws of this State, 
The Secretary of State is authorized, empowered and directed to cer- 
tify to the county clerk of each county the form of the ballot and 
also to take every step required by this Act ind by the general 
election laws of this State to be taken in such cases; the res- 
pective persons whose duty it is under the genernl election laws 
of this State to c!use notices of election to be given and bnllots 
to be printed, and the elections to be held a7nd the results there- 
of to be n.scertnined !nd declmared, are authorized, empowered and 
directed to take every step required by the Statutes of this Stpte 
to be taken in such cases, so as to cause this question to be prop- 
erly submitted to the People of this State. 
       13. The Secretary of State is authorized, empowered and di- 
rected to c".use publicn.tion of this Act to be mae, one each week 
for three months at least, before the vote of the people shall be 
taken upon this Act. Such publicAtion shall be m%de in at least 
two daily newspapers, one of which is published in the city of 
Springfield, and one in the city of Chicago. 
       The Secretary of State shall further cause a copy of such 
Act and a digest thereof to be published at least once each week 
for four weeks immediately preceding the election at which this Act 
is to be submitted to the people,, in at least three d,ily newspapers 
published in Chiclago other than the newspaper published there se- 
lected for the publication above provided and in at least one daily 
newspaper published in each of the following cities:  Savanna, Free- 
port, Rockford, Waukegan, Elgin, Aurora, Sterling, Dixon, Rock Is- 
land, Princeton, Streator, Joliet,..Aledo, Kankakee, Galesburg, 
Peorin, Bloomington, Macomb, Canton, Pekin, Champaign, Danville, 
Lincoln, Decaitur, Quincy, Beardstown, Jacksonville, Springfield, 
Mittoon, Carlinville, Alton, Vandalia, Robinson, Olney, E. St. Louis, 
Belleville, Centralia, Mt. Vernon, Fairfield, DuQuoin, Benton, 
Carmi, Herrin, Harrisburg, Cairo, Metropolis, LaSalle, Ottawa, 
Pontiac, Effingham, Morris, Lawrenceville, Wheaýton, Mt. Carmel, 
Augugsta, DeKalb, Monmouth, Pittsfield, Clinton, lainrshall, Litchfield 
Murphysboro, Yarion, Ann-, iparta, Nashville, and two newspapers 
printed in some language other than English. 
       14. The provisions of this Act for the payment of the prin- 
cipal of the bonds a't maturity and of the interest thereon, as it 
shall accrue, by a. direct annual tax which has been levied herein 
for that purpose, or from other sources of revenue appropriated for 
that purpose, shall be irrepealable until such debt a.nd interest 
be pDaid in full, and for making such payment the f?ith of the State 
of Illinois is hereby pledged. 
 
 
APPROVED JUNE 26, 1929. 
 
 
provides that the first sale of bonds shall 
not be made until there is a surplus of $750, 
000 in the conservation and public recreation 
fund; requires monep in the conservation and 
public recreation fund derived from the fees 
for licenses to fish and hunt to be first used 
for payment of the principal and interest of 
such bonds but in case such fund is insuffi- 
cient provides for the levy of an annual tax 
sufficient to pay the interest as it shall 
accrue and to pay off the bonds within thirty 
years from issuance; provides for publication 
and for submission to the People; makes the 
provisions for payment of bonds and interest 
irrepealable and pledges the faith of the State 
to the making of such payments; go into full 
force and effect? 
 
  

					
				
				
 
President 
 
 
MAKE DAILY ENTRY EACH 
     NIGHT 
 
 
Hunter 
 
 
Address 
 
 
H 
e-u 
0m 
 
 
0 
z 
 
 
C I  m       0. 
   I-     0           0 V  0 o 
 
 
[.. ..         1, 
    1 1   ... i~ i .. .I..... ... .......?.. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
           II 
 
 
 
 
 
       j.  ......  ;Il  i Vi?22 i - ... 
            -~7- 
 
 
 
 
 
                     !T 
           T . 
 
 
 
 
                1.. 
 
 
 
           S. .. ...      1 7...'.... 
 
 
 
              1.1..... 
 
                   l . . . ... . . . .1 
 
 
                 POST ON YOUR CLUB BULLETIN BOARD 
"IF YOU WANT MORE GAME AND FISH FOR ILLINOIS RESPECT STATE AND NATURE'S
LAWS" 
 
 
.14 
 
 
924-11-11-":' ýSTATE           OF ILLINOIS                  
  01 
        DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
   GUS H. RADEBAUGH, DIRECTOR        FRANK E. ABBEY, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 
             HUNTING CLUB DAILY REGISTER 
                 MIGRATORY BIRD KILL-ILLINOIS GAME CODE, SECTION 27-A. 
N a m e  o f  C lu b   ...... ....................  ..............N.........................................
.......... ..... L ocation   .........................................................................
L icen se  N o  ........... 
 
  

					
				
				
				
				
 
 
THESE ENTRIES TO BE MADE AT 
      DEPARTMENT OFFICE: 
Pollution      ........................................................ 
Aquatic Growth ....................................... 
Depth      of   Water ............................................. 
Delivery      order entered .................................. 
No. of Order .......................... 
Hatchery or reclaiming 
  Station .............................. 
Truck     ..................................................................

Railway       Car    ....................................................

Checker ............................................................. 
 
 
Approved by Director. 
 
 
APPLICATION FOR RESTOCKING FISH 
 
                                      Date .............................................

Town  or City .................................................................................
.County . ............ I ............... ........................ 
                   Closest to point of Delivery 
 
 
To the Department of Conservation, State of Illinois: 
    We, the undersigned citizens respectfully request that a delivery of
fish breeders be supplied for restocking purposes. We 
guarantee When fish are delivered in fish car that all tr    portation charges
from   fish car to waters will be borne locally. We 
further agree to co-operate to the fullest extent with the Department Inspectors
and Investigators in the protection of these fish 
during spawning or closed season. We are pleased to give your Department
the following information: 
 
Lake  or Pond Name: ..........................................................................................
Location?  ........................................................................

                                                                        
    Miles and direction from town or city above 
Private or Public Owned? ................................ Source of Water
Supply? ............................................................ Depth
............. feet; Depth during 
 
drouth ...................... feet; Is lake or Pond free from Pollution?
........................... ; Is aquatic vegetation present? .......................

 
River or Stream Name: ................................................ In
what Water Shed? ...........................................................
River depth...................... feet; 
 
Depth during drouth ..........      feet; is aquatic vegetation present?
........... ."."'Is factory waste or city sewage emptied in River

 
or Stream?......____; If so how much? ....        ................ Delivery
Instructions: Railroad entering town or city  ................... 
 
Hard Road Nos. ............ ; Name and telegraphic address of party to be
notified ................................ 
 
Last delivery of fish made to these waters? ..................................................
Was increase in fish population noticed? . ....... 
 
We are pleased to endorse this application: 
(State Senator, Members of Legislature, Judges, City or Town Officials).
 Name of Applicants:             Address: 
 
 
..       . .... . ..............I....'...... .° . ........... ... ...
. ... ... .°..... 
.......°°.......°......°... .........°°°.°°°...o..
.......... ....o......°°....................°°°°........

......'........................................*°° ....°.....-.,.°°..........
. . , . .o°. °°° ° o °°° °° ,°
° 
 
 
(87392-3M-4-28) 9 qIW 
 
 
.................................. .. ....... ............ .... ,..o.o ..
...... . ..... .... _. 
 
......................... ............................. ... ...o.°.....°
, 
 
 
Any additional information please write or type on back of this sheet. 
                            (OVER). 
 
 
             STATE OF ILLINOIS 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
   GUS H. RADEBAUGH   FRANK E. ABBEY 
         DIRECTOR             ASST. DIRECTOR 
 
 
I 
 
 
.... ...... ............. . ... 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
1fF 'y© 
 
 
ma'IW I shi 
 
 
Wantl 
 
 
Stlate 
 
 
in . 
 
 
Reamnact 
  I Ir 
 
 
N    ýr"atu" e,ý a Lagws 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
LIST OF STRIP KINE OF ILLINOIS, CLASSO1 AS SHIPPING MIN&S. 
 
 
                       Po-it Off it.oe 
Name of Operator          of t        ain offie of       General Supts  
     Remark 
                          mn         the compan 
 
 
Black Servant C.Co. 
 
Gayle Coal, Co. 
 
 
Harrisburg Coal 
Aiining Co. #2 
 
Huskeq Coal Co.#l 
 
 
Huskq Coal Co.#J 
 
Maoth Coal Co. 
 
Perfeotion Coal Co. 
 
Prosperity Coal Co. 
 
 
Pyramid. Coal Co. 
 
Tiger Coal Co. 
 
Ute.& Electric 
  coal co. #1 
 
United iýlectrio 
  Coal Co. #4 
 
Uni ted Eleotric 
  Coal Co, #5 
 
United leotrio 
  Coal Co, #9 
United Eleotric 
  Coal Co. #12 
 
VauHoose Coal Co. 
 
Yaakeo Branch 
   Coal Co. 
 
 
9lkvifll 
 
 
 
 
Harrisburg 
 
 
Carterville 
 
 
 
 
Marion 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  I, 
 
 
Ci~ba 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Catlin 
 
Gearion 
 
 
Georgetown 
 
 
(a) Address same as 
 
(b) Address same aS 
 
 
310 Adms Bd1g. 
Danville 
645 Rookery 314Bg 
Chicags 
 
Harrisburg 
 
 
960 Old Colony 
Bldg, ,Chiag 
 
 
 
Denton 
 
DTL(;4oin 
 
1418 Yisher Blg. 
    Chicago 
 
 Marion 
 
 Canton 
 
 
 DDanv ill a 
 
 
T.S.Cousins (a) 
 
 
J.H*Crawfor%4 (a) 
 
 
HeAgasky (b) 
 
 
            "(b) Not working 
 
).C.CJobn (a) 
 
Jas.lMsherry a) 
 
J."dmW ian 
   Herrin 
 
C.F.amiU.lto (a) 
 
Carter Norristb) 
 
 
J.B.Pjmelvjille( a) -* 
 
 
if 
 
 
if 
 
 
if 
 
 
if 
 
 
if 
 
 
Herrin 
 
 
An 
 
 
if 
 
 
if 
 
 
if 
 
 
R.L.VmHoose (b) 
 
 
   Trre Haute,        T.L.Lnh (a) 
     Ind. 
 
that of the mine. 
 
that of the main office of the company. 
 
 
* Vice Free. & Gen. Manager, 
 
 
I 
 
  

					
				
				
(4497--3M--9-28 9Q 
 
 
    TD IS INDENT1     b E, made and entered into this ........................................................................

A .. D .. 119 ............  b et w een   ..............................................................................................................................................................

 
of the town of ---------------------------------------------------------------------,
County  of ................................. ...............................
 State  of 
Illinois, as party of the first part, and the State of Illinois, acting by
and through the Department of Finance 
for the use of the Department of Conservation of said State, as party of
the second part, 
    W ITN ESSE  TH :  That ....................................................................................................................................................

the said party of the first part, for and in consideration of the leasing,
and of the covenants and agreements 
herein mentioned and to be kept and performed by the said party of the second
part, has demised and leased to 
the said party of the second part the following described lands, pieces and
parcels of lands for the uses and 
purposes only hereinafter set forth, to-wit: 
    (1) ..................................................... ..................................
....................... 
 
 
    (2)   ................................................................................................................................................................................

 
    (3)   .......... ..................... .......................... ..........
.......... ................................................................................

 
 
To have and to hold the above described premises to the said party of the
second part and to their successors 
in office  from  the ---------------------------------------------------------
... -day  of ....................................................................,
A. D. 19 .......... 
to the ...................................................   ay  of ------------------------------
....................................   A . D. 19 .......... 
    And the party of the second part for and in consideration of the leasing
of the premises above described 
and the covenants and agreements to be kept and performed by the party of
the first part, agrees to pay to 
the said party of the first part on  or before the ...............-....................................
day  of ............................................. 
of each and every year during the term of this lease, the sum of one dollar
($1.00) as rent for each of said 
parcels of land. 
    And the party of the second part covenants with the party of the first
part that at the expiration of the 
terms of this lease, it will yield up possession in so far as it has rights
and privileges hereunder, to the party 
of the first part without further demand or notice, in as good order and
condition as when the same were 
leased by the said party of the second part, loss by fire, inevitable accident
and ordinary wear and tear 
excepted. 
    It is mutually understood and agreed by and between the parties to this
agreement that upon the con- 
sideration above set forth the above described premises are leased to the
said party of the second part for no 
other purposes than that of the conservation, propagation and protection
of game and fur-bearing animals, 
game birds, song, insectivorous and other non-game birds in section 46 of
the Game Code of Illinois, 
said party of the second part shall have at any time and all times full right
and authority to enter upon said 
premises for any and all lawful purposes in connection with the propagation,
conservation and protection of 
all game and fur-bearing animals, game birds, song, insectivorous and other
non-game birds at any time found 
or raised upon the said premises; that it will, through its officers, deputies
and agents, make such efforts as it 
may with the forces and means at its command, to protect the same from all
persons whatsoever; that is to 
say, that this leasing and contract is expressly understood and intended
by and between these parties as and 
for a game preserve, and that no game or fur-bearing animals, game birds,
song, insectivorous or other non- 
game birds thereon shall be taken or destroyed by any person, including the
parties hereto, during the term 
of this leasing, without the mutual consent of both parties. 
     It is further mutually agreed between the parties hereto subscribing
that the party of the second part 
may plant on such parts of the premises as may be agreed upon between the
parties, but not to exceed five 
acres for each 1,000 acre reservation, patches of grain of the kind fitted
for food for game and game birds, 
and that such rental shall be paid for the same as may be mutually agreed
upon by the parties, but such rental 
shall not exceed the usual or customary rent of similar land in the vicinity
or locality. 
     It is also mutually agreed between the parties hereto that such grain
as may be planted by the party of 
the second part, shall be permitted to mature and remain upon the premises
during the entire season, and to 
be used for no other purpose than as food for the game and game birds thereon.

     It is further mutually understood and agreed by and between the parties
hereto that the said party of 
 the second part as represented by all its duly commissioned officers shall,
at any and all times during the term 
 of this leasehold, have free access to, over and upon all of the premises
herein leased only for the purpose of the 
 conservation, propagation and protection of the game thereon. 
     It is further understood and agreed by and between the parties entering
into this covenant that the party 
 of the first part shall do all things possible and reasonably within his
or their power to prevent any 
 hunting or shooting upon the said premises, and will assist the said party
of the second part in spirit and in 
 fact to make the terms of this lease effective as affecting the propagation,
conservation and protection of game 
 and fur-bearing animals, game birds, song, insectivorous and other non-game
birds; that it will, during the 
 seasons when game are exposed to cold, stormy or snowy weather, make such
provisions as it may deem best 
 for the protection and feeding as well as the conservation of all said game
and fur-bearing animals, game 
 birds, song, insectivorous and other non-game birds. 
     It is further mutually understood and agreed between the parties hereto,
that the said party of the second 
 part will furnish and cause to be posted at ............................................................
convenient and prominent places 
 on said premises, signs advising all parties that the said premises have
been legally constituted a game preserve, 
 and that all game and fur-bearing animals, game birds, song, insectivorous
and other non-game birds thereon 
 are protected at all time during the started term of this lease, and provide
the same at its own expense. 
 
     In witness whereof the parties hereto have set their hands and seals
this-.. -----          ----------- - ------ ......... 
 
 day of ------------------------_ ......... .A. D. 19 ..... 
              d a y.                                    . . .. . . . . ..
. . . . . -- - - - -- - - - -- - - - - ....... .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. ..
.. . ....... ............... ... 
 
 
 
                                                                   STATE
OF ILLINOIS, 
 A pproved :                                         By .............................................................................................

                                                                       Director
of Finance 
                 Director of Conservation 
 
  

					
				
				
(4497-3M-9-28 9C 
 
 
    THIS INDENTURE, made and entered into this ..........................................
day of. .............................................. 
A..D ..119............ betw een  ..............................................................................................................................................................

 
of the town of -------------------------------------------------......................
  County  of. ...............................................................-
, State  of 
Illinois, as party of the first part, and the State of Illinois, acting by
and through the Department of Finance 
for the use of the Department of Conservation of said State, as party of
the second part, 
    W ITN E SSE TH :  That ...................................................................................................................................................

the said party of the first part, for and in consideration of the leasing,
and of the covenants and agreements 
herein mentioned and to be kept and performed by the said party of the second
part, has demised and leased to 
the said party of the second part the following described lands, pieces and
parcels of lands for the uses and 
purposes only hereinafter set forth, to-wit: 
    (1) ............................................................................................
......................................... ..........................................

 
 
    (2)....-_---. ............................................._- --------------.........................
. .................................. 
  ......... .................. ............................ ...... ....................................................................................................................
-............. 
 
 
  3    ) ...... ...........................................................................
.....................................................................................................---
*..... 
 
To have and to hold the above described premises to the said party of the
second part and to their successors 
in office  from   the ................................ ..........................
....day  of ... .................................................................
,A . D . 19 .......... 
to the ....................f............................... day  oft --------------------------day
------o--------.---------- --...........  A. D. 19 .......... 
 
    And the party of the second part for and in consideration of the leasing
of the premises above described 
and the covenants and agreements to be kept and performed by the party of
the first part, agrees to pay to 
the said party of the first part on  or before the ....................................................
day  of ............................................ 
of each and every year during the term of this lease, the sum of one dollar
($1.00) as rent for each of said 
parcels of land. 
    And the party of the second part covenants with the party of the first
part that at the expiration of the 
terms of this lease, it will yield up possession in so far as it has rights
and privileges hereunder, to the party 
of the first part without further demand or notice, in as good order and
condition as when the same were 
leased by the said party of the second part, loss by fire, inevitable accident
and ordinary wear and tear 
excepted. 
    It is mutually understood and agreed by and between the parties to this
agreement that upon the con- 
sideration above set forth the above described premises are leased to the
said party of the second part for no 
other purposes than that of the conservation, propagation and protection
of game and fur-bearing animals, 
game birds, song, insectivorous and other non-game birds in section 46 of
the Game Code of fllinois, 
said party of the second part shall have at any time and all times full right
and authority to enter upon said 
premises for any and all lawful purposes in connection with the propagation,
conservation and protection of 
all game and fur-bearing animals, game birds, song, insectivorous and other
non-game birds at any time found 
or raised upon the said premises; that it will, through its officers, deputies
and agents, make such efforts as it 
may with the forces and means at its command, to protect the same from all
persons whatsoever; that is to 
say, that this leasing and contract is expressly understood and intended
by and between these parties as and 
for a game preserve, and that no game or fur-bearing animals, game birds,
song, insectivorous or other non- 
game birds thereon shall be taken or destroyed by any person, including the
parties hereto, during the term 
of this leasing, without the mutual consent of both parties. 
     It is further mutually agreed between the parties hereto subscribing
that the party of the second part 
may plant on such parts of the premises as may be agreed upon between the
parties, but not to exceed five 
acres for each 1,000 acre reservation, patches of grain of the kind fitted
for food for game and game birds, 
and that such rental shall be paid for the same as may be mutually agreed
upon by the parties, but such rental 
shall not exceed the usual or customary rent of similar land in the vicinity
or locality. 
    It is also mutually agreed between the parties hereto that such grain
as may be planted by the party of 
the second part, shall be permitted to mature and remain upon the premises
during the entire season, and to 
be used for no other purpose than as food for the game and game birds thereon.

     It is further mutually understood and agreed by and between the parties
hereto that the said party of 
the second part as represented by all its duly commissioned officers shall,
at any and all times during the term 
of this leasehold, have free access to, over and upon all of the premises
herein leased only for the purpose of the 
conservation, propagation and protection of the game thereon. 
     It is further understood and agreed by and between the parties entering
into this covenant that the party 
 of the first part shall do all things possible and reasonably within his
or their power to prevent any 
 hunting or shooting upon the said premises, and will assist the said party
of the second part in spirit and in 
 fact to make the terms of this lease effective as affecting the propagation,
conservation and protection of game 
 and fur-bearing animals, game birds, song, insectivorous and other non-game
birds; that it will, during the 
 seasons when game are exposed to cold, stormy or snowy weather, make such
provisions as it may deem best 
 for the protection and feeding as well as the conservation of all said game
and fur-bearing animals, game 
 birds, song, insectivorous and other non-game birds. 
     It is further mutually understood and agreed between the parties hereto,
that the said party of the second 
 part will furnish and cause to be posted at ............................................................
convenient and prominent places 
 on said premises, signs advising all parties that the said premises have
been legally constituted a game preserve, 
 and that all game and fur-bearing animals, game birds, song, insectivorous
and other non-game birds thereon 
 are protected at all time during the stated term of this lease, and provide
the same at its own expense. 
 
     In witness whereof the parties hereto have set their hands and seals
this ------------------------------------------------------- 
 
 day of..-------------- ---------................A. D. 19...._ 
              ..                                      . . ..a y. . . . ..
. . .. . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . ..
. . .. . . ..... .... ................. 
 
 
 
                                                                   STATE
OF ILLINOIS, 
 Approved:                                           By ...............................................

                                                                       Director
of Finance 
                 Director of Conservation 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
N o ............... ..............................  STATE OF   ILLIN OIS

                                        DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                             Springfield,
Illinois, .......................1......... 92 
     I HEREBY CERTIFY THAT,                                             
                                               .. 
 
 
   of  H   R E  YC    RC ounty ......of......................................-........I...............State.....of.................

 
 o .......  ....... ............................. ...........................................................
.,  C o u n ty   o f  .................. _ _...........................................................................
..................... .,  S ta t e   o f  11I  p s , 
 has paid the FEE OF TEN DOLLARS ($10.00) to the DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION,
Springfield, Illhtiois, 
 and is hereby authorized to hunt Migratory Birds and Waterfowl on the lands
and waters described herein and 
 owned, leased or controlled by the above licensee, subject to the provisions
and penalties of The Game Code'of 
 Illinois and The Migratory Bird Treaty Act. 
 
                        LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION OF LANDS AND WATERS 
 
 
 
   S. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . ............................. ..........................
...................... . . .. . . ................... ........................................................................
. .................. ................... .................. .................
.  ............. 
 
 
                                  EXCERPTS FROM       THE GAME CODE OF ILLINOIS

    "Sec. 27A. Every person, association, club, corporation, and all
persons, firms and partnerships owning, holding by lease or other- 
wise, or controlling land and water, or land or water, used or intended to
be used in whole or in part for hunting migratory birds, or having 
a privilege to hunt thereon migratory birds, shall make application upon
blanks furnished by the Department and pay a license fee of ten 
dollars ($10.00) to the Department of Conservation and secure a license covering
such land and water, or land or water, from the Depart- 
ment of Conservation, before such person and guests, persons and guests,
firms and guests, partnerships and guests, members of such 
association and their guests and the guests of said association, members
of such club and their guests and the guests of said club, stock- 
holders and members of such corporations and their guests, and the guests
of such corporation, shall upon such land and water or land or 
water be permitted to hunt or kill migratory birds. 
    Every such person, association, club, corporation, and all such persons,
firms and partnerships. respectively: 
    (1) Shall keep an accurate daily register showing the number and kind
of migratory birds killed by each person, including officers 
and employees hunting on such land and water, or land or water; and 
    (2) Shall respectively issue, at the end of each day's hunt, to every
person, officer and employee hunting on such land and water, or 
land or water, a certificate or statement in writing of the number and kind
of migratory birds killed by him or her on that day, thereon. 
    Such daily registers shall be exhibited to and shall be open to inspection
by all officers of the State and county authorized to make 
arrests or serve process, and to all persons having authority to enforce
the game laws of this State, including the officers and employees of 
the Department of Conservation, and every person having migratory birds in
his or her possession killed on any such land and water, 
or land or water described above in this section, shall show and exhibit
for examination his or her several certificates or statements, herein 
above named, of the number and kind of migratory birds killed on each and
every day of such hunting when requested to do so by any of 
the above named officers of the State, county, persons having authority to
enforce the game laws of this State and officers and employees 
of the Department of Conservation. Failure to produce such certificate or
statement in writing shall raise the presumption and be prima 
facie evidence that all game in such person's possession was killed on one
day. 
    However, no person living on or owning any piece of land shall be required
to secure any such license or to keep any such daily register 
for the privilege of hunting migratory birds thereon, either for himself
or any member of his family, or for any guest or guests from whom 
no compensation is received, either directly or indirectly for any hunting
privilege extended to him. 
    Nothing contained in this section shall be construed to permit any person,
on other land and water, or land or water, to kill more than 
the daily limit of migratory birds named in this Act, and to that end every
person hunting migratory birds on such other land and water, 
or land or water, shall daily keep his own record of the date and number
and kind of migratory birds killed on each day of such hunting, 
and likewise every such person having migratory birds in his or her possession
killed on such other land and water, or land or water, shall 
show and exhibit for examination, his said record of the date and number
and kind of migratory birds killed on each and every day of such 
hunting, when requested to do so by any of the above named officers of the
State, county, persons having the authority to enforce the game 
laws of this State, and the officers and employees of the Department of Conservation.
Failure to produce his own record by such hunter 
shall raise the presumption and be prima facie evidence that all game in
such person's possession was killed in one day." 
 
 
 
          [SEAL]. 
                                                                        
        Director. Department of Conservation. 
    NOTE.-This license, the daily record, and premises must at all times
be open to i tio f employees of the Department of 
Conservation and other authorized officers of the law. Hunting Club Licenses
expire on    5, following date of issue. 
 
 
(59502-100-11-26)                2 
 
  

					
				
				
 
                              On the skirmish line. Frank Collins about to
go into action 
 
 
 
 
 
Next Door to Chicago 
 
 
Shooting pinnated grouse, or prairie 
           chicken, in Illinois 
 
 
By BOB BECKER 
 
 
"W"     rE'LL have an Irish water-span- 
  I/*/ iel, an English Labrador re- 
  V//triever, a wire-haired pointing 
          griffon, and--" But I didn't get 
any farther. 
  Bill rose to hlis feet, dramatically ex- 
tended his right arm and in a deep bass 
voice said: 
  "Hold your horses, ladies and gentlemen. 
The elephants are coming," as if to imply 
that I was going to lead a circus parade. 
  Then and there the consultation broke 
up in wild confusion. Thus started our 
plans for an unusual prairie-chicken hunt 
involving everything, as Bill said, except 
the use of a poodle dog and a Russian 
swamp hound-whatever that is. 
  Laugh if you want to at the list of dogs 
enumerated, but I'm here to tell you that 
you can go prairie-chicken hunting with- 
in sixty miles of Chicago with an Irish 
water-spaniel and a Labrador retriever 
and get a wonderful day's sport. Yes, sir; 
laugh that off, gents-if you can. Now read 
on, and we'll tell you how we did it with 
these two dogs, as the griffon wasn't al- 
lowed on the scene until later. 
  Frank Collins, the well-known sports- 
man and trap shot of Morris, Illinois, 
invited us down for a whirl at the chickens 
on his place. Frank has without doubt the 
most remarkable private hunting preterve 
to be fotrnd on the prairies anywhere near 
Chicago. There are thousands of acres in 
his tract bordering the Illinois River,-You 
can take , big wagon, attach a couple 
of horses to It, climb aboard, ramble over 
one atretch of Frank's prairie and see 
prairie chickens, quail, pheasants, snipe 
and ducks In a few hours. 
  One day last fall we stood in one of his 
fields and watched a covey of seventy-five 
Srairie chickens whir away out of sight. 
  alk about your Dakota landscapes! Can 
you visualize the hunting that Frank has, 
and all within sixty miles of a city of 
3,000,000? 
  Frank owns an intelligent little Irish 
 
 
water-spaniel named Queen. I had shot 
ducks with Queen in the blind, and I 
knew that she loved to hunt and could 
handle that type of gunning. Frank said 
that with Queen he could get prairie chick- 
ens and if we'd come down he'd show us 
how it was done. 
  Now there is nothing unusual in this 
program if you're familiar with the way 
some of the boys up north handle the water- 
spaniels. I know one breeder up in Sas- 
katchewan and one out west who train 
their water-spaniels to hung'to gun just 
like the springers and cockers. The dogs 
rove within range of the gun, put up the 
birds and then retrieve. When the duck 
season is on, these water dogs take to the 
water like true retrievers. 
  But I had never seen an Irish water- 
,paniel gallop on a prairie to oust prairie 
chickens for hunters; so frank's invita"' 
tion to come down with Bill Hart and his 
Labrador retriever listened like a million 
dollars. Bill and I piled Diana, the non- 
slip retrieving Labrador, into Bill's bus, 
and away we went to Frank's "feudal" 
estate early on the morning of the big 
day. It was no trick to get down there, 
as sixty miles of concrete whizzes by 
in a hurry when you're on the way to 
a hunt, 
  Frank was all ready for us at his lodge 
outside of Morris. He had ordered a fried 
chicken dinner to be served in the field. 
When we checked in at his place, he an- 
nounced that we would drive in our cars 
only as far as Bargo's farmhouse and then 
wed leave the gas buggies behind. From 
that point on it was a case of rolling over 
the prairie in Bargo's big wagon. 
  No covered wagon in the days of '49 
could have been more picturesque than our 
"rubberneck" wagon as it started across the 
prairie toward the haunts of the prairie 
chickens that morning. Bargo sat on the 
front seat, a jovial 220-pound driver whose 
wear and tear on a plug of tobacco was 
awful. Queen, excited at the prospect of a 
 
 
hunt, was tearing around the wagon, tip- 
ping over the water bottle and rough-hous- 
ing all of us in general. Guns stuck out of 
every corner of the wagon-armament 
enough to equip a regiment. 
  It was a great day for a ride in the. rub- 
berneck wagon-if you had a cushioned 
seat. First through a field bordered by 
cornstalks, from which blackbirds flushed 
by the thousands. To the right, sailing low 
over the -weeds, we could see a marsh hawk 
hunting for mice. Passing one small pot- 
hole, we flushed a few teal. As far as we 
could see there was nothing but corn, buck- 
wheat, fallow fields grown high with 
weeds, wild sunflowers, thistles and rolling 
prairie. 
 
"I''VERYBODY       out I" called Frank, 
  1.ithe boss of the covered-wagon outfit, 
after a short ride. "This is a good field for 
chickens. C'mon, Queen. Get busy now I" 
  So we piled overboard into a forty-acre 
field which dipped to a shallow valley. 
Queen, tail going, romped ahead of us. 
Porky was on my right. Bill Hart was on 
my left with Diana, the Labrador, taught 
to heel when her master walked with gun. 
Down the field we moved. 
  Porky had all the luck. A bird was put 
up not twenty-five yards from him. I saw 
the old twelve get into action, and then 
whaml down came the chicken, a clean 
kill. Queen rushed in to retrieve and shortly 
brought up the first bird of the day. 
Three more flushed ,a couple of minutes 
later, but we didn't get a shot. The ex- 
pedition moved across the fields to the big 
sweep of prairie which rolls gently away 
from Frank's wonderful duck pond, known 
as Round Pond. 
  "Now, boys," said Frank, making no, 
move to get down from his back seat on the 
rubberneck wagon, "here is where the! 
shooting really begins. I'm going to let 
you fellows do your stuff while Bargo and 
I follow with the wagon. Spread out a bit,. 
keep in line with Queen ahead of you, andi 
 
 
4, 
 
  

					
				
				
2/23I29 Les"4 
 
 
Mgo$ of *Sam" Los Ustri mic of 111. 1&BrtwA 
 
 
(Bu1*tin of   ist  B    Vo. ZW Art. I Ot*Ut 23.) 
 
 
Aar N.    Aar,  No*   Ae.        M& 
 
 
am 
 
 
       r~w                      175 
 
 
1, 
 
 
No. 
 
 
       Popatmm pr q.Iti 4 *as 
 
 
2"u  aU 
 
 
11 fall 10 
 
 
...   16 - -.-.-. -.- - ..... . 
 
 
*tm . . . - 
 
 
O 5 - S 5 S 
 
O - - - - - 
 
 
 
O 5 5 
 
S S S S S S S 
 
 
state 
 
 
7 
 
2 
 
 
yan 
 
 
90"bft% 
 
Contra 
 
Itertbom 
 
 
Contra 
 
sertkows 
 
 
com - - 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
Woods - - a a 
 
Su      a - -- 
 
UatsA Ulw - 
 
 
U5 
 
 
-mai a 261ln 
 
 
3-- 
 
 
w a t &e     mn   x 
 
    la   I         S t  S 
 
  zax,. sefius toaesfl*Ar 9T 
 
 
Numer -e sq gMie of al winter Sir" In th sevra 1wi 
 
 
              I  21 
 
  Plowtgrova 
  Pastur 
  swmp          IMO 
  Orsbar 
  Woods 
  three 
  I~st*and fuow 
  Tar" =a"rasms I To 
 
    ft~iay tro qpr"Ma 
 
Puig -'   rrw -way 
 
 
I 
 
 
a 
I 
I 
I 
I 
 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
 
 
Nartka  a     t" 
 
 
f 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
 
 
ufttftl 
numas 
 
 
 
 
 
   T4 
 
   779 
   430 
   19W 
 173P# 
   4" 
 
 
Id 
 
 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
£ 
I 
S 
I 
 
 
Iw   - 4 . 
 
 
a a -Ow*- 
 
 
$p 
 
 
4" 
03 
ba T 
a 9 
06 
319 
d-0-0 
130 
LM 
n33 
1013 
M 
W 
 
 
ON 
 
  

					
				
				
File Illinois 
 
 
                         Digest of 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 1~   5,000.0  Frairi Chike*~ *$stbm4 k1114* in Nebrs        14 few 
      Your* ho*  of which 4,000j,00 for maret 
 
p.2   "Th tru  pina~ted grouse in neve  f . except whr ma ha 
         br xthe so, O   thewet    and dotted th prairies with 
     trove of treos.4 
 
P-3   600 chicken killed in 10 days in 1972 in Mcea 4*., 111. by 
     Capt. A. R. Bogardu an Mils ohnson.      50 birds per C   per da 
 
 
 
         **esoconfiold of S. 1. Iow, t*       a f mir j~ys spr on 
 
 
 
         nubrwhich will gather Into wht westerner call &*ack      Ist

      realy rowr-ble ever grws in the coutry soeAgy hain 
      his foliow." U heio* packo can be mad t. be by Mopw4 
      flushing). 
 
P. 5  *It Iss a bif th-t Iincreae  with the first sores of cOvlYL1tI.%, 
      pauaso with the seondand dis~appears with the third. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
                             quail in Ifllnoi 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          The year  925 wa the banner oner for qmail3, when 10,975 
 
were distributed. and a record was kept of the release of birds by 
 
counties. The numbers pt out in each county are shout M   the map, 
 
whore each dot represents 10 birds, 
 
          In 1926 the number was smaller because o so many 4yiug in 
shipment ar inability to get them, and a great may ordrs had.to 
 
be eancelled. We have a recor  ef 5,000 which were release& ana 
 
asinine that the aproportions went. into dLifferent counties as 
 
in 1925, In 1.927 qu~ail distribution was curtailed on accout of 
 
umay c~'ng In shipment a4 the high cost of the birds, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                    5c 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
in Illinois by Counties (Tota 16,521 bird) 
 
 
AlexuLna' 
3.3" 
 
 
Calhoun 
 
 
 
 
 
Clay 
Colo# 
Clin~ton 
 
Craford. 
 
DeKalb 
Dewitt 
Douglas 
 
 
 
 
Fayette 
Ford 
Franklin~ 
Fulton 
Gallatin. 
Green 
 
Hn-sck 
 
 
 
 
Jackson. 
Jasper 
Jefferon. 
Jersey 
JoDwwlies 
 
Kakakee 
 
Kendall, 
 
 
  50 
 
  100 
 
  400 
 
  50 
  100 
  10M 
  375 
 
  87 
  100 
  81 
  25 
  50 
  75 
  125 
  100 
  275 
  100 
  500 
 
  200 
  m7 
200 
300 
175 
95 
1M 
50 
250 
100 
 
225 
50 
 
185 
175 
 
175 
100 
125 
75 
1W0 
 
 
Knox 
Lake 
LaSall. 
 
 
 
MLeem 
Livigsto 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Monacon 
 
 
Pearion 
PMarhl 
 
 
 
 
 
Miorgan4 
 
 
 
 
Soott 
 
 
Pike 
Poenlin 
Pulaski 
 
 
125 
35T 
375 
  25 
 
  100 
  M2 
  350 
  200 
  275 
  50 
  1M 
  100 
  574 
  M2 
  150 
  150 
  M5 
  50 
  256 
  281 
  200 
  75 
  175 
  125 
100 
225 
75 
175 
 
425 
187 
50 
50 
450 
 
75 
50 
200 
675 
547 
50 
475 
575 
 
 
waxne 
White 
ibiteside 
 
Winnebago 
Woodford 
 
 
160521 
 
 
100 
50 
175 
250 
275 
473 
50 
1-50 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pheasants and Pheasant *go 
 
 
          Ix 1924 there were 40,000 phasant eggs disritbute& 
 
   adin 92  this nubrwas increased to 65#000** In 1925 
 
about 5,000 pheasants were turned. loos in the state btL reords 
 
by couies are incomplete, 
 
 
Mr. R*.4bxmg: 
 
 
(Perhaps Glen Palmer, of the eorkvile State 
 
Game Farm,, coul& oontrite Sme data on the 
 
phe"Asats pxt out in. 1,925 a&u 1926.) 
 
 
*       ' i s aco  te list of adesses of partie.a receivin 
   both pheasant a  cIuk eggs, but we did not use thm, 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ph.ats tim - 14) * 
 
 
Champaiga   14 
Clinton     58 
Co          28 
D0tt 
Franklin    10 
   Fulton12 
Iroquoisw   12 
Jo Davkess        U 
 
Lake        12 
Lee         10 
 
 
 
   Ile-Lean12 
auon             4 
Madi1 60 
 
   Mercer10 
Pike        12 
Scott       20 
Steh 
St. Cl&ir   70 
 
 
   Willison, 10 
 
 
Total -    708 bir4A. (.ut of 5,000) 
 
 
 
 
 
  For which we ha& reorl of 708 reiea.& 
  by outies, out of over 5,000. 
 
 
(im SEA 1926) * 
 
 
pheamuts. 
 
  

					
				
				
File lii 
 
 
P. 10 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Th birds of "'here Texa and Loisian a" smaler and darke t~ the

.**wo bird. 
 
 
    In wvo   P1r~airie %o$oot on th      Lan na family covey, as t.* 
the boln~te, ba in winter, in so" setioAsq the    rost in tross    In
the 
fall sevral coey *.ng  ato in a pekm    torte ftahim of pamgn        n 
   crae uai.  Prf. 1. Yo. L, Dea  .   She writer that at An* Iowa dur 
   In h earl o*jtMss he tnequotIl tam4 paks moberi  as.w  as a thous 
asd birds an that they habituall rosted in tb* lon gras      b~siL  slogh.

The prairi hen is mirtr      in the not~npart of its rw^        a, 4 to a
cerain 
 
 
 
    In Novber and Doeo    lag  fteoks of prairi chiken*.aa     frm nr~th

    or   oaM a~ souther         to settle for the winter in northern Miss-

    oui and southern Ioa~. This migmti~n vwis in bulk. with the seveity of

    .the winter. 
 
 
    Th  eaiatLa in1hic   tbo bird is heldm be roolise4 fr~ the fact 
that in10   h  upya     r   3 oý5abaenhr          o  the 6egw&

 
 
 
 
 
    So rslutatý,A  ocxs.-ai0 7 is it to fly that it m~ hardly 'bo
t-t ap, and 
1ofeassW Cook  Worms tbo writer that severl tios *11* htmtia      Lanothr

Viaa.*ta. he sowa pointie dag J~uk and cath a thre.4.auth* grm        prairi
he. 
 
 
    At %he bogiaixg of tha* ninteeth cetur     the pWraii en bas   osrol

alxm~nt througtou QhL*sa aM  tuy   It Isenw rareLa botb states A pr 
of the groa it bes lost inta los.t It hat, gaine  by a westm4r and northwar

mov*mt.   It has followe  the grIaif told& of the pioner o athe T' ain*,
and 
with the ext~njiýnof gat in cultur  inte Rinnsta andMaaitoa it bet'
becom 
p1aat~if tbe"  Acodn    to Dr Hst4 it was by n me-asscmo   *he the 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
Xxtaits fro %rus & wIt14 utk      of the VU 5' 
 
 
  *t*.   a firt eL   to          m~o a d be "ye tq a t In Uh1inois as
hate a. 1f36 
  & hute was emtt   1z l oc  if heoul beg a dozen In a da.   Som yeaslaer.

  witb wh less effart on .,-4 have shot 50 inaa, and ters wer reords of 
  100 to a s LhAg gv. 
      rw foro   status of the bird As tbi Zst to well Indicted byA~bl 
 classicosorheetitoas at Rodrol., in 1810. Audbon wys 
 
           Inths     yo duing the win~ter     th m Or*" woldoter th
 oro 
      -ar aM feet with the poultry, slight 6ath     hoss or5 #walk ia the

      ver stwots of the villags,.  I reollect having cauht sveral In 
      a stable at Nouearso where the had t.11*we. som Wild Tvr  s  zn 
      the e.use of th   wowinter, a friend of min, who wae fond if prý

      tiein  riflehoig     killedtpad of fort4 in onemas    n    u 
      pick*  non of them up so satiated with aimo Var hot as wel as ever

      hev~w of his faily   My ow servants pref#ere th  fattest fiLLeh of

      bacns to their flteh and not unfrequtly laid them asid as unf it for

      cooking.   *     They coaul not bay* boon sol& at %or* tho  mes
cset 
      *piece#0         $ o rare bay they becam is the markts of P ilab1elpha'

      New Tork  and Boston tat they sell at trom five to tea dollars the
pair, 
 
 
      So fat'as the sportm  is sinoerti, the pririi hem is mxov extint in

 
 
 
        Thrughits operati '- the sal of the prairie hem "as viiiulmty
*toppe 
  io V902 and 1903 inall2. the 1ar stitles of the last. 
 
 
  ?#13 
 
      3. N. N~elon In  n  th writsr that La the osarly seveties in northwsoter

/  llino's the fprints La many pl~es *xro    the prairiv  in spriW, after
the 
  ptairio hon*snuted, "d of tea g-Mred for bouheoUd use laer numbers
of the 
  *ga tbus oteeps0 
 
         The~ Prii h  Mhs the wlyant~ge ha~vrw of yielding more ts&dil
to 
     dmoticti)n he  thre 1ýb.hite, and bttang atfowts thomit ho mode
to establish 
  pr   m~rvs of dametientea Virds for rotocn coutry Ore th         speiens
is ex 
  $Lad,   Su.stsftl *ntor-prias of this kind would be profitable. ~Th   
suh 
    dwsticatiit is rmseabl* sand &v  fonsible, the apýýns
  quotat Las from Audubo 
 
           Th Pinneet Or-)u  is easily twol n eatssii k~pt. It also breads
in 
       confiemen, and I bR-tv 3ften felt surpiesd thAt it has not boon fairly

       domeetcate&   While it R~drsn   I prhsd sLy alive, tht "ere
oz. 
       presaly caugt for me within twelv tiles of tbhat ?~is&*, and bih
    L in a 
       Ug laid wcose the Vb.* of a heoes  I cat the tirs of their win*,*
 and 
       turned thoem loose ina 5 ~.5 and orch"Aabl   -out arers La extent.
within 
 
  

					
				
				
                                    -3- 
Iltt3.ts frm "Oros     111 Turke  of the V. 5.0 
 
P. 13 
 
 
         a wee they bceo   tom  nog   to allow m to aprahthe     without

         their being frightene.4 *    #  In the coure of the wiater they

         bpe*   so gentle at tofeed fr= the rm4 of aW wife. and rakd ab-e)

         the   *t~de  like so man  4am fowls, U1~gli1W ocaoeio31l7 with the

         £o&*tio poutry    *ho          sp 3ering returne they
strutted, ltoited, 
         an  fmwht, as if In the wild& *hers they b,- received their
birth. 
         Ma"ny laid~ epws and a good numer of p %oc    vi   hi   re-acO

 
 
 
 
 
 
              fro GOt~ore to April, Inclusive, the prairi hen takes littlo

         bu  ve~tnblo fod    fhis elemet sonts to 33.., par cent for the

         year. rmt c@onxtituts   11.79 per.a5tj lenyeo, flowers, &aad
sob#At 
         25.0, perent# se~eds 14. " ptrnotj grain, 31-06 psmnt, and
wisoiul- 
           noa# vegetals material, 3.06 percent. 
 
 
              The prairie hen eAtea uwh  maUlr proportion )f seeds witb h

         *rptlou of gr-An. than the bobwhttO, aM In this respet is. less

            usflth" the latter bird. It is, h.)weer, a better weedr
thean aay 
         other groas, .an its services In tbi particuar are vothy of c nsd

         *ratioA. 
 
 
         F. 17 
 
 
              Th  stomaks and crops   alto.ne  In the inot int~ai~n coontained
31.06 
         p~eret of grain.  The bobvviiW, another btq 4ul~blo fe#,ýr,
tahes only 
         17.35 percent. 
 
 
 
 
              Utually1 the prnirie ben is=c   less given to bu4U4i_ tha the

           rufe gr.us, bu~t it ha. been noym to pluck 'bud of polr elm  pirne*

 
           '41 hav  oitei mo$ tha 50 an a singl api-Ol tme," wintes
Autoa. 
           "the buns of vhich they entirely detroyed in a few hours.
     *  0 
           Thymre. in fae-,t, looke apoa with mor abhrrnc  tha  th  crowm
Fr 
           at present in Ztasschusett@ &Ad Mine, an acon      f the maischief
they 
           carwittet amn the fruit trees of the orcha~rd  during winter,
w~hn they 
           fed on their bn~e, or While in the spring mnathe, they pice up
the grain 
           In the fields.* 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
3z~strqt from '0mmi and Wild Auke of the V. S.' 
 
  P.19 
 
 
       Wil1ba P)ewst. in 11 ascertaned that, mll t*U, there war*~b 
   only ,*bout, 20r bth hone, and that4 they ver con ac1 to ab-)t 40 squ
 11Mls 
   oft~m isamd of Uawtha. Vl~ad 
                          - - - - - - - - - 
 
 
 
 
 
       R. C. W-rols1.r, of the Biolvical Su"y, found the omown In Augst,,

   19,01, iA Wheeler Couty, rez. 
 
  

					
				
				
                                                    File: Illinois ,, 
                                                          Deer 
                                                          Fox 
 
 
 
Excerpt from "Some Concepts of Bioecology," by V.E. Shelford. 
         Ecology, Vol. XII, No. 3, July, 1931, pp. 47-459. 
 
 
 
         "One of the outstanding facts is the increase of the deer 
 
accompanying the destruction of wolves, foxes, etc., by early settlers 
 
in Illinois. Wood ('10) depicts a continuous decrease in wolves 
 
and wildcats from the beginning of settlement to their practical 
 
extinction. When the wolf was reduced to about one half, the deer 
 
increased rapidly for a little less than 10 years, reaching a large 
 
maximum of about three times the original number. An increase in 
 
the raccoon, skunk, squirrel, and red fox began at the same time 
 
as the increase in deer." 
 
 
 
 
 
 
         Accompanying the article, on page 457, is a graph showing 
the changes in abundance of 9 species of mammals following the 
settlement of Illinois. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Illinota 
 
 
CARROI 
 
 
  HANCOCI 
ADM 
 
 
Pw 
 
 
   RAND MýNA: 
LETTER SIZE OUTL 
 
  ILLINC 
        SCALE 
Copyright by Rarnd MAIIly k C 
      MAI'O IN U. S, A. 
 
 
I 
 
 
(J 
 
 
GREENE jMAC( 
 
 
 
JERSEY    I 
 
    --MADISON 
 
 
           HENRV 
 
MCK ISLAND 
 
 
 
 
 
    SI.- 
       KNOX 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       CAS 
 
   M _ - MRGýA 
     SCOTTl 
 
 
.LY 
ENE MA" 
 
 
 
 
 
Smpany,  ChtAR 
               --o.... [/ -AIIGO .... . .... 
 
 
W.              91.            - oroj. War of C nR o0 88. o 
The Law Prohibits Copying or Reproduction by Any Process lor P'ersonal Use
or Resaie. 
 
 
PEORIA WOODFORD 
 
 
             r 
     TAZEWELL  1.1" 
 
?dASON11 
 
 
  '---4  
     .    L 
     ILOGAN~  7  E 
MENARD 
 
SANGAMON 
 
S     jCHRISTIAN--7 
 
UPIN T 
 
    MONTýGOMERY~ 
          5AYETTE 
 
"--  o.L~ .o-BO 
    *'SOW 
       L  rA' 
 
 
'I 
 
 
k; 
 
 
I 
 
 
STEPREN$ON  WINNEAGO 
 
 
  L OGLE 
 
 
EIDE LEE 
 
 
 
SiREAU 
 
 
    ST riK[UTA 
    j - -  -I - 
 
 
1 
 
 
1 
 
 
I 
 
 
"BoON£j R MIC HENRY  fLAKE 
       it 
 
               3 P 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  i .....           t'# o .    & 
    KLCO    KAAKE   r' "r  ir 
 
 
'Tv otu , j, . IN,', 'U.* * 
           1IOUP O I 
 
 
MLEA                Th C 
      i  A "I N M NEE 
 IVINGSTON                    41''  1 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          - i      :   a 
      ,i- i!''°°          Sro 
 
 
        EDGAR       : u a1Nia  
   ijE        I. IG 
 
 
 
 
 
      (RATI 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   D-1  *      LE NCi E 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   SAIN E ,A            (K 
   *" UMBERLAND 
 
  

					
				
				
 
ld I L.. % 
 
 
r 
 
 
KANKAKEE 
 
 
  COUNTY 
 
 
    ILL. 
 
 
6 
 
 
7 
 
 
5 
 
 
00/ 
 
 
a 
 
 
RIOE. 
 
 
4 
 
 
9 
 
 
to 
 
 
II 
 
 
1af8k         1 
 
 
4 
 
 
'3 
 
 
ML R9E. " 
. 51,, 
bj5j4 A _2 
 
 
VAl 
 
 
TI 
 
 
r. 
F 
 
 
renon* 
 
 
. E_ _ -. ....... U r .. ;  . 
 
 
K 
 
 
ARE 
 
 
33 
 
 
22 
 
 
23 
 
 
1' 
 
 
24 
 
 
19 
 
 
4 
 
 
N 
[2 
 
 
121 
 
 
'23 
 
 
35 
 
 
--40 
 
 
36'i 
 
 
- - wI.1 i * r I 1.. .. .. .~ r .u n iim i m sm 
 
 
6 
 
_7 
 
 
 
'9 
 
 
30 
 
 
6 
 
 
'6 
 
 
00# 
 
 
5 
 
 
 
 
.t 
 
 
RitE. 
 
 
7 
 
9 
 
 
i 
±1 
 
83 
 
 
La 
 
 
1 
 
 
fT6k 
 
 
22 
 
 
" 
 
 
K 
 
 
I 
 
 
2 
 
 
26 
 
 
-Ia 
 
 
35 
 
 
-'U 
 
 
2 
 
 
. 1 
 
 
-Mr 
 
 
'4 
 
 
36 
 
 
-no 
 
 
4R12E. 
 
 
RISE. 
 
 
Rt4P. 
 
 
       7  9  to6 I 17  0 
 
 r            44 
 
 
19 20 21 '23 24 19 20 21        4 
                      R14-E Im 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       _ _ _ _ - r     _ _2 
 
 
27 
 
 
26 
 
 
25 
 
 
29 
 
 
28 
 
 
V 
 
 
26 
 
 
25 
 
 
.. I-it  9   9 ea I bo  (5IEMl.JYIctU? DkWfISNLA 
 
 
Ilk 
 
 
'I' 
 
 
It11 
 
 
Sf 
 
 
6 
 
 
5 
 
 
~~Res. 
 
 
-- iiu 
 
 
in'. 
 
 
-u 
 
 
'2 
 
 
ZN 
ii! 
 
 
21 
 
 
34 
 
 
35 
 
 
2 
 
 
36 
 
 
46 
 
 
32 
 
 
5 
 
 
A 
 
 
4 
 
 
N 
 
 
3 
 
 
35 
 
 
l/ 
 
 
St 
 
 
-4 
 
 
l/ 
 
 
4I 
wi 
 
 
S3 
 
 
'2 
 
 
,,~~~L l - fi i 
,  ,,, ,, ,I  .'F l e ',. .,.S6. ' . 
 
 
It 
 
 
6 
 
 
Si I 7 a 9 12 7t 9o j ¶10 
 
 
rNI 
 
 
'23 
 
 
24 
 
 
kit" 
 
 
$1 
 
 
'5 
 
 
--- 
 
 
S 
 
 
    29     30 2S9 
-           . :d. :- 
 
 
36 
 
 
n 
 
 
r 
 
 
a' 
 
 
KW 
 
 
1 
 
 
23 
 
 
XLE 
 
 
m 
 
 
C- 
 
 
31 
 
 
R 5 A IND 4A4I 
-CH AI GO 
 
      to1     1  '              o8 9,1 181 
 
p                               - - - m - - - - -g 
 
  If       15 45 is0 e 1 6 1 4 1 i 71      _71   3 1 
  6  5 
 
 
 
 
 
 
              1R12W.                   -, IfW   C@. POW 
 
 
R9E 
 
 
C'] 
Co 
H 
 
 
H12 
 
 
-4 
 
 
FH 
 
 
m-- 
 
 
w1 .... 
 
 
27 
 
 
I 
 
 
3 
 
 
4 
r4 
 
 
/ 
 
 
ml 
 
 
Pq 
 
 
! 
 
 
35I 
 
 
I 
 
 
# 
 
 
F47 
 
 
A Jill  lii II. Ill* 
 
 
R1,41lV 'f 
 
 
Co.: ROUUO15 ROE 
 
 
ORUD 
 
  

					
				
				
 
1<                                                                   
                                                              I 
 
 
- II.  - 
 
 
V                                                                       
    yAYY 
 
 
\4J 
 
 
>4 
 
 
7 
 
 
*1 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       proyilen, 
              IL 
tlnivWltly of tiIook 
 
 
            L EC 
 
 
 
mOaorkasis with ha 
M DorA esols with m 
EDDrk #WAS With *A 
 
Dark soid withim 
  lInclu" eOr*" 
 
 
FReHow 4WAS wifi 
    OBrwne pyolkw 
Pi  inldeflat aF 
  O] werepy 
 
     Brownieh Y0ll0 
     arAk-colored 
     Light - colored 
  Band Mateom ý 
    muc Im 
 
 
   Hlly forest, orchfrd1, and Pester* land. 
SJftck spot* present. 
 
 
    miles 
Lmmm&.N 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
  UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 
           STATION 
 
 
  .SEPI4Ei6OI! 
          6 _ 
noLi'ý 
 
 
   GENERAL SURVEY 
   SsMAP 
 
 
   ILLINOIS 
(CHIEFLY AFTER F. LEVERETT'S 
        GLACIAL MAP.) 
 
 
C AS S 
 
 
U nglaciated areas 
E    Illinoisan moraines 
     (Win Illinoisan glaciation) 
EE   Lower Illinoisan glaciation 
j Middle Illinoisan glaciation 
     Upper Illinoisan glaciation 
SPre-Iowan glaciation 
UIowan glaciation 
     Deep loess areas 
     Early Wisconsin moraines 
     (in- early Wisconsin glaciation) 
U     Late Wisconsii moraines 
     ian lWte Wisonsin glaciation) 
D     Early Wisconsin glaciation 
 
      Late Wisconsin glaciation 
W    Old river bottom and swamp areas 
SSand, late swamp and bottom lands 
 
 
4 
 
 
     -WZASHXICT 1T 
31 
 
  --1-IQ 
 
 
"SALINhE 
 
 
  Investigation of 
     Illinois Soil 
   Y      G      PBY 
KCYRIL G. HOPKINS 
 
  

					
				
				
				
				
				
				
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
         STATE OF ILLINOIS 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS & BUILDINGS 
        DIVISION OF HIGHWAYS 
             MAP OF 
 
 
BOONE COUNTY 
 
 
SCALE IN MILES 
 
 
a   I   1            3 
 
 
    F4 
3E. 
 
 
c 
 
 
           R.4E. 
S0  N   S    I   N 
     6      i,,  ... . P .. . 
 
 
  /VJ#1                            /0Yl 
Ao 7  6 /A/4I          /    9   6 /  1 
 
   C'N  S 
   20 X/                            £.qLep 
 
 
A . ... .  2 
 
   (  3 
 
 
0.I 
 
 
U] 
 
 
r7 
 
 
25 
 
 
BLAII 
 
 
OE: 
 
 
26 
 
 
26S 
 
 
144- A        1,         = I 
 
 
"H~Tý 
 
 
      F 
 
 
22   .3 
 
 
27     I 
 
 
tj0 
 
 
36  
  0 
 
 
.36 
 
 
I-A ~ l itt-----IN -  Ii-  -.1t 
 
 
L ISO/V_ 
 
 
31 
 
 
5I1 
 
 
a 
 
 
33 
 
 
213,22 
 
 
-s-- 4: JW-4--.  = 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
 
i - 0 n  -iý; 
 
 
- I -*  - I - 
 
 
/0 
 
 
* ' U. 
 
 
--o 1 
 
 
7   i  - II 
 
 
I.- 
 
 
+ -q+--- ft ----1- * 
 
 
I2~ 
 
 
_______ 4+ - It.-.iI - + 
 
 
26 
 
 
3A.Z. 
 
 
RUSS 
 
 
9 
 
 
0 
 
 
I  
 
 
LLVII 
M 
 
 
/S 
 
 
2e 
 
 
.35 
 
 
LE 
 
 
1/ 
 
 
to 
 
 
I 
 
 
 
is 
 
 
W 
 
 
£ I' 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
 
   "i ",LEGEND 
----CONCRETE ROADS 
    -STATE AID ROADS 
    .STATE BOND ISSUE 
    3 MACADAM ROADS 
 
    [TOWNSHIP ROADS 
    ..,,--STATELINE 
 
 
0~.I 
 
 
is 
 
 
10 
 
 
i:N vlV 
 
 
9 
 
 
t   t        U 
 
 
g0RAW  J6 
 
 
4 
 
 
pp.A 
 
 
1A (7 
 
 
I IE 
 
 
1                   4-T 
     9  0 I3 I 4 /U 2 
 
 
R  E 
 
 
  RE   E 
 
 
L 
 
 
R.4E. 
 
 
IL 
 
 
.,4-' 
 
 
-i=*  t = 
 
 
N 
 
 
I- 
 
 
-COUNTY LINE 
.TOWNSHIP LINE 
* SCHOOLS 
+-CEMETERIES 
 
 
lcoh.3 
 
 
RTES, 
 
 
R. Z 
 
 
W 
 
 
5 
 
 
-- 
 
 
Jo 
 
 
Ji:'4. 
  6 
 
 
29 
 
 
-4 
 
 
a 
 
 
z 
0 
 
 
Z 
 
 
0 
 
 
z 
qt 
 
 
O7 
 
 
26 
 
 
J34 
 
 
) /6 
 
  2/ 
 
 
  26 
 
 
  33 
  U 
 
 
-If' 
 
 
V  
 
 
/ 
K S 
 
 
h 
 
 
Kl 
 
 
-I'V 
 
 
19 
 
 
IL? 
LX 
mFz9 
I1 
 
 
I arl, l;o.J 
 
 
  wlk 
 
 
 
 
zz 
m 
 
 
4 
 
 
p 
 
 
o 
 
 
       -HI.5rOpY- 
 
Lo         Boone of hf kyk.1 
        iIn /90, was 15322. 
  lb oa1 i 293 suaov ln ki/e withnan 
//7 the !ea,- oF i923 
 
 
TV 
 
 
36 
 
 
 
Ný- 4 
 
 
>11 
 
 
.
	
				
 
L .ogItfde Wet fr 
 
 
  C-> 
'K' 
 
 
0 
 
 
              0 
 
0 
       +. 
  o      j. 
 
 
/1 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
Li 
 
 
<2 
  0 
 
 
       F 
C--1.---- 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
39 
 
 
       OUTLINI 
 
       ILLI] 
    AMERIOA 
Rand, McNally & Co., I 
   160 - 174 Adami 
      ALE OF ST, 
 
 
oox 
 
      0 
 
 
 
 
        0      - 
 
 
0 
 
 
   *0 
 
 
 
 
Ilo 
 
 
/ 
 
 
-I-- 
 
 
0 
 
 
ritdo We.t WIron. Gr ýwlcb. 
 
 
         0 
 
 
 
 
 
  IC Ii 
 
 
 
  /0 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
I 
       0 
 
 
 
 
   0 
 
 
0    0 
 
 
J94f 
 
 
91 
 
 
__j 
 
 
/ 
 
 
I 
 
 
V < ( 
 
 
'If 
 
 
40. 
 
 
30 
 
 
t 
 
 
-7- 
 
 
 
   0 
 
 
I -- 
 
 
-C 
 
 
/ 
 
 
I 
 
 
I / 
 
 
oil 
 
 
r - 
 
 
42 
 
 
-T__. 
 
 
 
 
 
  -r 
 
 
. Gý..Iýb. 
 
 
I 
 
 
i ..... 
 
 
i 
 
 
If 
 
  

					
				
				
 
O       26  41884-1000 11 26 
 
  

					
				
				
 
THE 
 
 
I/I '4 7m.  
 
  

					
				
				
 
(35308-5M-7-.25) "-,?7 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          i                   ... 
 
 
                           VERMILIO 
 
 
 
 
              BERARD~tID 
 
 
 
 
      C                            40 
 
 
8x 1 Outike Map     0 T 
     ILLINTRIE 
 
     INDIANISTIAI 
 
  

					
				
				
Illinois 
 
 
              o Di)A°VIES S  S mPHENS oNjWNNEBAGO  BOONE  MC HENRY  LAKE

 
 
 
 
 
 
              0.K <.LN I           rGR. . -i 
          M-RCE- !  .. __i.,,°-         . 
             1                                iR tL OL 
 
 
               I     I.1    iPNA     i KANK 'KEE 
                                1----- T I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
             M          MON'ER.M t      Kr" C"B AN KAE 
             1WAREN             LIVINGSTON 
                       PE O RIW 0 FO RD , 1IR O 1U O IS 
 
           GENDRSON iIE 
       HANCOCK Mo DONOUGH TAZEWELL 
 
                     MASO~itHMAIN-                    E 
 
 
 
                  LSA               L-N- - -- 
 
 
 
 
 
     ADAMS                            .- -R 
               WARINTO CEASSSO 
               MORGNRO SAGMNI        OGA 
           HýE  j- 
 
        RANDHRCNSTLAN            N   oý 
   LETTER SIZEREEN OUTLIN MAP- NIOjHSNOE[D 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ILLINOIS                                   I 
 
 
 
Cop.right I~c Barnd ,M4NaIiy k Company, Chicago 
        M         A D I S O L ~ U . 2   A 
 
 
The Law Prohibits Copying or Reproduction by Any Proeexs tor Personal Use
or Results 
 
 
L           9z.        0. Nmgtsd. we of a"rieot or 88.      - 
 
 
4ý 
 
  

				
      
      
				
				
 
 
                   0 
      S C0              0      N 
 
 
      WATER~~~~~~ 0UVE  AUA  ITR  URE 1ELGLSRE 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   E D I    T 0 R@ GEEA FIECIRRA 
   T             A               N C 
 
 
 
 Z   0  0L0GICALSECT1 0 N          0 OAIA ETOS 
 
 
 
 REEAC BIOOG INEC INEC PRBES    BOAN 
 AN   AN   SUVE COTRL            AND 
 
MAAE FIHRE                      PLANT m.-a 
M E N T MAAE                    PATHLOG 
  Mm  E N T WEMN.IN  LADUIIAINX)EE AIN 
 
 
COLETIN CLET1NS 11 COLCIN       COLCIN 
 
  C    0 0 P E R A T I V* S H I  5 
 
 
 
  BUEA  0. F   P L A N T  IN US R  STT  DEPRTEN  OFARCUTR 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
i      Wongitude  Wes  from Areenwich. 
 
 
 
 
 
1 
 
 
    I-- 
 
 
      C- 
----I 
 
 
       0 
 
     -7 
 
 
0/ 
0 
 
 
      - _I- 
 
 
C) '- 
 
 
I- 
 
 
- j 
 
 
0 
 
 
0/ 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
--r 
 
 
'-I 
 
 
& 
 
 
a 
 
 
          I 
 
Rand, McNall 
      160-I 
      p   n 
 
 
/ 
 
 
---9- 
 
 
0 
 
 
/_ 
 
 
ILI 
 
 
 
     Ii _o 
 
 
0 
-        -1 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
K--- 
 
-I 
 
 
0 
 
 
0              o 
 
 
-  oqr.en. lf1fln4MeNMiy SO. 
 
 
91                         LongitUde West 90frun. Grenwtob.             
               I 
 
 
42 
 
 
SB5 
 
 
oil 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
41 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
0 
 
 
4f 
 
 
40- 
 
 
39 
 
 
0 
 
 
  ] 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
42 
 
 
0 
 
 
1 
 
  

					
				
				
N ..... ..8.                        ...                            wI   
  I 
 
 
IL - - -- - - 
 
 
-1 
 
 
I LIVINGSTON 
I 
 
 
Map H 
 
 
-A1 
       I 
       I! 
 
   t.I 
 
 
Ch io 
 
 
B 
 
 
4 
 
 
1420. 
 
 
5 
 
 
6 
 
 
7 
 
 
8 
 
 
I 
 
 
'   N      0 
 
 
a,     8     - T 
 
 
w       x      y   z 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
I    Legendr  c     u      AVIES-' STEPHENSON  WINNEBAGO 78 
  INalterfowl clul or           CAROL 
         -   pre s re                    OL 
 
 
       Group of toll !farms,           H    i 
                 wate fowl 
       Group  of  club ,        ,J             ------. . F.A. -SA LLE 
              waterfo 1              HENR 1iUREAU 
                       CK ISLAND 
      WV~            M MRCER4 
                     war rf 'l -fii--" -             IPT  . 
 
 
         4--                    KNOX             $i 
 
 
 
 
 
 
              - 9-                       PEORIA   WOOý __- ' 
 
 
    33-                                      L___,  
               P3 K     A     cL rJCRITIA-, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
         -J-                            t    'S         E 
                    HN ' aLDiN               MONTGOMEWEL 
 
 
 -Q                                            'LJ 'N 
                  ADISN SBOND 
        --              '-rWRO,;;       -ME !A O o, - - - - . . 
 
 
 
                   WZ-SN                      A SHINGTN J ES 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
      Incomplete Map of                       JA CKSON i--M-S 
 
CLU/BS, PR          TOLL FARS                _    ! 
                GREENEk                      6IC UNIO 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       Game Suarvey ofI 
          I -L L I 1 T O I S                    -    . _ . _ . 
 Aldo Leopold.        May 1, 1929                     /%( 
 
 
OEKALB -C KAN COOK 
     ;      Ir 
 
 
            DUPAGI 
 
 
     iENDAE Wi 
 
 
 
 
 
 
LIVINGSTON"Y 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       ~CHAMPAION 
 
    (PIATTj 
 
 
 
        DOUGLAS 
 
 
 
 
        CUMBERLAND 
 
        '- TJASPER 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   WAYNE 
 
 
 
   HAMILTONFFWHITE 
 
 
 
 
 
     POPE  AiiirI 
 
 
 
 
IIASSAC\ 
 
 
SSW J 9030310 Op1Ug Or flCWOUU3tIoD by Amy Pvmuu for persuul Use or Rern1e

 
 
lllfaois 
 
 
    -i 
 
 
UGIS 
 
 
 
 
 
-1 VTERMILION1 
 
 
 
 
 
 
J EDGAR 
 
 
d 
 
 
CLARKI 
 
 
 
RiF 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IWABASHi 
 
 
4 L I I 
 
 
91                 0. L-     . - ,k), 
 
 
The Low Prhiitsr Copying or Reprdution by kn7 ]Proeel for Personal Use or
Resale. 
 
 
92                91               90* -x   t . reenw M. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     A+?tf   
 
ACO 
        / 
            zqoO 
 
 Rcw 
 
      4,N  (T 
 
             I'? 
 
 
-v C 
 
 
2.10 
 
 
VuA to. 
 
 
...~ .i     ........ . 
 
 
 
'&u4 ¼f4 
 
 
   &~M(~X~1'5 
 
 
'OQt 
 
 
1cf214 
 
I  
 
 
 
1012?' 
 
 
 
 
 
I i2  
 
1 Z7 
 
 
IC7S 
 
 
) 
 
 
  (1 ( 
I(c) 
 
 
  92-1 
Ao o7  " Uzo 
    19z6 ZI      Z / 75  . 
 
 
 
 
 
4&              fr/d     0.3 "~ 
 
 
'5 
 
 
20 
 
 
20 
 
20 
 
20 
 
 
 
 
2o 
 
 
tooo 
 
300 
 
 
 
 
 
340 
 
 
4     15   to0 
 
 
S 
 
 
;-  I5 
 
 
 
i    7. 
 
 
0.2- 
 
0,7 
 
0,5 
 
0,3 
 
 
 
 
 
6~ " 
 
 
  01.5* 
 
 
 
 
 
C 
 
 
4 
 
 
( 
 
 
r IL 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[00        1.1 
 
2&0              70 
 
150               s-C) 
 
           110 
 
 eso       i.O    i) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3          £.   Jo 
          12 
 
 
I1014, 
 
 
I ýO) 
 
 
5           75 $s 
 
 
Q e,-,AZ C0 
 
C L IA 
q 
 
 
L 
 
 
1 
 
  

					
				
				
 
iqL c I, ýr.41 
 
 
  CD 
I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
J .\; 
 
 
tv R.  
 
 
 
H (3 
 
QAMM 
 
 
 
 
     
 
L C O&t 
 
 
I4?  
 
 
v 6,4 
 
 
"411 
 
 
r 
 
 
vu~d 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(  ri) ~ 
 
 
 
1J~ 2~ 
 
 
4tz tA     ~     t 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    -%*~~~ 4'-L~                       a 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  6A cl ý 
 
               ZA /2V -I- 
 
     L,~ 
 
  

					
				
				
 
/ 
 
 
 
     cJe 
 
 
 
     IL4& 
     IW Q 
     (Y a. 'V 
 
 
     z 
         w c. 
 
 
AA 
 
 
rcA) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   /  
 
 
I C L2aL&t 
I) J&1 j2;;r 
    &Cc)D C, 
 
 
I CAAaL i&      ,,  
 
 
       2 
QtkA         ,a4A& 
 
 
2L)   JO 
 
 
8' 
 
 
5oc 
 
 
                 LAA 
 
 
tic  
 
 
c4 
 
 
0 
 
 
  F         ' 
 
 
Z/     15             'K5-ý /  ý 
 
 
c4 ?L, 14AaALdQ 
 
 
g.74 &AA 
 
 
F-       ý /Z-1ý 
 
  

					
				
				
 
h~q C 
 
 
~ A A ~ C ? $ ~ A ~ C ~ A ~ - ~j t A l 
 
 
w r 
	
				
 
    c+,,       v     ,    C, 
  I If   +-+., ..         C,.+ 
 
 
 
 
 
*.. + 
 
 
 
 
 
oB mJ,  
 
 
m, P.+,+. 
 
 
(61491--50--1-27) -,,MW,2 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Op e k? O e. a &,B& L It. an ,  Is UpIckm cd Game..- 
 
 
11 
 
 
/ 9io 
 
 
 
 
I 
 
 
K- . . . . . . 
 
 
1 hm 
 
 
30 
 
 
7S 
 
 
OQvs opet4             15 
'OSlt fimit-;       15, 
 
 
15b 
 
 
1 
 
 
Iqzs 
 
 
 
 
/  qz8 
 
 
Chic
	
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
                  /043 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     AM , '7 ta 
 
 
 
Qcf~ I L-         72W4 Al/3 ! MT W LJQQl&ý 
 
 
 
 
 
  124 A' t-Y CLA c' 
  OLE, -t W  pt! 
 
 
  I feti..   9 
  2-4         76r ?0 
  3 95/ 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
                                      Table D.--Qua'il census and kill, Illinois

 
                                                                  Population
                         Kill 
                                         -              - - - - - - - --
- - - - - - - - --- --  - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 
       Observer - Place - County         :Acrer;e:   Year    :Covies:Per
covey:Birds:Acres per bird:   Kill   :Acres per bird:Per cent 
          -- - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - -   - - - -   - - - -- -  
- - --  -- - - -- - - -- - - - - - -------------   - - - - - 
 C. F. Mansfeld, Jr.                 : 435      1907  :   S  :        : 120
:     3.6 
 Preserve (owned), Green county      :      :   1926  : 21   :        :315:
      1.4 
 Leased                              : 2400 :Best year :     :        : 
   :             : 1300  :      1.8 
                                      :     : averagý,e :::      
                           600         4.o 
            -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -  -- - - - - - - - - - --
------------------ ------------------------- --------6o   -- - - -- - - 
--.--- 
 
 N. R. Huff                         : 640   :10 years:    5  :        : 75:
      8.0             Closed to hunting 
 Farm, Hamilton county              :    (This is a sample of unproductive
quail land.) 
 Wayne county                       :   10  :Seeral yrs.* 3  :        : 45:
      0.3     :   7   : 
                                      (This is the heaviest stocked range
Huff knows of.) :-:                      : 
          ---------------------------------9------- ----------          
  --------9-- ----------- --9    --  ------------9-- 
 
 H. J. Bowman                       : 220   :  1921   :   4  :   20   : 80
:      2.7     :Closed to hunting since 1921. 
 Fairmont property, Madison county  :       :  1924   : 50   :   20   :1000:
     0.2     :Always fed in winter. Killed 
                                            :  1928   : 15   :   20   :300:
      0.7     :a few cats. 
            -------- - -----------------   --9-----    --.--------------------9---9-------
-------9        ----------9------- 
 
 H. J. Bowman                       : 115   :  1916   : 12   :   20   :240:
      0.5 
 Kirsch property, Madison county    :       :  1928   : 18   :   20   : 360
:     0.3    :   100  :     1.1     :  28 
                                            :Beat year:  IS  :   20   :360:
      0.3     :  250  :     0.5     :   70 
                                                                      :::---------
      :(Fed in winter. Ten cats per yr. 
                       -- - -- - - -- - - -- - -- - - -- -   -- - -- - -
-- - - -- - --- - -- - - ----    -  ------------------- 
                                                  150                   
                         :     1.0:    : :0 
John M. Olin                           150     1925   :  9       20   :10.:8
                150        1.0        go 
Kirsch and part of Fairmont property :      :  1926   :  9  :    20   : 130
:     o.8    :   150  :     1.0     :  80 
   Madison county                               :        :       :      
  :           :              : 
                                               1927      9       20    1o0
o.8               150        1.0        80 
                                    :       9         9     :         : 
  :             :Fed in winter. Killed 6-10 cats 
                                    :-- ---                           : 
                          per year 
                                    ---- -------------------- ------- ----------
-----  ------------- ------ --------  ------- -------- 
 
Ed. L. Kanaker                      :   29  :  1928   :  4  :    15   : 60
:      0.5        Closed for years. Fed 
                                    *       :         9     :         9 
  .             :        winters. 
Kanaker homestead, Union county     :       : 
------       ~    - --------------                     ..--.------ ---------
------ ------ --------- :------- ------------------ 
 
D. R. Abernathy                     :1000:     1928   :13:       12   :156:
      6.4 
Lawrence county                     :           (This is average Lawrence
county quail country.) 
      ------------------------------.-        -        -  --- -- - - - -
- - - - - - -- - - - - - - -            --- - 9- - - - - - - -- -- ---- 
 
0. E. Huff                          : 160 :    1925   :  5  :    15   : 75:
      2.1    :    35  :     4.o     :  50 
Elder Lee farm, Clark county-  ---            -    -    -   -    -    : 
  :(A little better than average.) 
                  ------ ~ ----------------------            -----------9---------------------9-------

 
C. E. Huff                              6: 10 : 1927     5       15     75
       2.1 
Edgar county                        *                    5  :         : 
  :      2.1 
 
M. M. Baker                            640     192    :  5       20    100
       6.4    :No shooting allowed. (Thinks 
       Conypae eracut      (14 miles :                      :           
  ::this is a, little better than ar- 
   west of Peoria.Peracut                                               
                :erage of local quail range.) 
     ---------------------------------- -    -----------------      - -9-----
       - : ----------.-----------.------ 
                                                 :   : ::             : 
  ::At least:: 
Frederic Leopold, 1 mi. south of Hopper- 160 : 1928      8       2o    16o
       1 .0        6o  : 
                                                 :   : ::             : 
  ::This is a sample of the best 
Henderson county                    :::::                               
                :rinve. 
                                    :(1/3 cult, 2/3 brambly slashed timber.
Been heavily trapped. Fox but no oats.) 
         - - - - - - - ~.               . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --.
. - - - - - -- - - - - - - --.. .- -.. . .. . . .-. - - - - . . . . . . .
. . 
Wm. Eroniger                        : 350      1928   :     :         : 500
:    0.7     :No shooting allowed. (This is a 
                                    wes:ofPeria:*:sample of the best range.

Tom Gilbrath farm, Henderson county        ::::                         
  :::: 
 
L. c. Dadent                 f:         O  :   1928   :          1 : 25 :
60 :   1.3        (Brushy land, small fields) 
 
Decent farm, Hancock county         :                       24 survived winter
                   :: 
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . .
. . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . . . . . . :: . . . . . . .
. -- - - - - - - - - - - - - 
Kenneth Knowlton                      160      1928      3       12     36
      4.5     :This is a sample of the best 
                                                 :   : ::            :  
  ::stocking in this county. 
Stephenson county                   .      .          :     :         : 
  :                      range 
                                    ;(/   ut    /  brmlysase      tibe. 
  ee  heviytrppd       Fo bu   oot. 
 
  

					
				
				
      Preliminary sketch map of glacial moraines of Illinois - 1929 
        Subject to revision according to studies in progress 
(After Leverett, Leighton, MacClintock, and others) Prepared by Y. L. Leighton

 
 
                            _Illinoan Series ,   ifconsin Series 
 
                    J1O DA SS", EPHEN N NE8AG 1800     .-1L AK. 
 
        MAP OF              \ 
      ILLINOIS 
 
 
 
 
 
                                            LASALLEA.L 
                      r                              5 
 
 
 
                      H NRGA S           LAoSLL 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                PIN MEN RMET 
                                      H   L* 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                   I NJEFFERSON I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                           MACSOINGNON 
 
 
 
 
 
Legend of XWisconsin Lorain,    -            . I" 
        F Lake Border 
I:i ddle f moraixtc system . 
                           'I T                HAMILTVRMIIO 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 isconsin 7 Valparaiyste o morainic <,. ,(           < 
       t~5 Einooka moraine    k"4\_ 
       r   arseilles mnorainic system 
.E2arly" 1Bloomington mora inic system       " 
i s c °sin 3  hCernohmP ai gn~od norai ni cman system  _,_. -: 
         iJ.Shelbyville ioraine(outer~ost) \ flites4A 
       A            CASS'                     INA4ee 
                                     'N                                 
        w 
 
 
 
                   SCT0                              2 0 2 0 4 
                                   "C 6- A          C 0 L E S 
 
                 \"',.                          , 
 
 
Scale 0  0 o 0 0ef 
 
 
10    10 20 30 40 
 
  

					
				
				
 
         JO DAIEiSS  STEPHENSON  WINNEBAGO  BO 
 
 
 
IlkI 
                HERROL  OG~   ~sLE A _ 
 
 
 
                  H ]Rv_.iUEAU 
 
 
 
              I-SAR . ~    PUTNAM 
 
 
              END RSLN ON 
              HACC oDNOUGH1'          TAZEWELL~ 
                ~ASON 
 
                  SCUYE               L N     DE IG 
 
 
 
                  M I-- MORGAN $-SANGAMON 
 
 
 
                      L *GREENE  jMAC P 
                      /ON I               ERYf 
 
 
                           MAO)ISON ~ I BOND" 
                                        II 
              ,,torz--            -.-d. y-ea--   .... 
 
 
 
 ""uffOE                              WASHINGTON jJE SiON 
 
                                NDOLPH PERRY 
 
                                             FRAiWILLI MS 
 
   RAND MCNALLY                               ILAS 
LETTER SIZE OUTLINE MAP                 UNION-1 N- 
 
  ILLINOIS 
         SCALE                          AEAERULASKI M 
C(opyright by Rand ,MVNa, lly  Company, Chiecgo 
       AMADN  IN  U. S. A. 
                     I Jv 
 
 
ONE MCN,,EN [, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  _..[EDALL1 
 
 
 
       II 
IVINGSTON 
 
 
         I iIRC 
 
 
 
 
      S    L_ 
      LCHAMPAIGN 
 
 
 rI 
 
 
 
 
 
       DOSGLA 
 SL 
 
 
 
 
 
 'L._-- . 
 
 
 "C-      RICHLA 
 
 ,-1 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 S~ALINEiGALamii- 
 -. jM. - 
SNAC 
 
 
A *JAI1 
 
 
(ANKAKEE 
 
 
UOIS 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
JEDGARi 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CRAW FOR 
 
 
TLANWREN6E 
 
ýiBil 
    WAAS 
 
 
I   I               FI]           I 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
c/urrt" ?  Open H    .$sc'n*j B.Ot? 1,,ItS o' Upland eame -  fi;r)0oas

 
 
Doas open. 
Dail.y Ii r_> 5 '0  *.S 
 
 
19OV 
 
 
 
 
 
Otte 
 
 
19qza 
     pha-il 
 
 
ca/# 
c/o. 
 
 
g1& 
 
tv 
 
 
11-I 
 
 
pn 
 
 
'ct- 
 
 
30 
 
 
45 
 
 
to 
 
 
7$ 
 
 
90 
 
 
15 
 
 
r 
 
 
act i 
 
 
P&I, J 
 
 
/Q$ 
 
 
120 
 
 
hic 
 
on 
 
 
r 
 
 
abbit" 
 
 
(V 
 
 
' 
 
 
z$ 
 
  

					
				
				
 
kV.i               -     .--"               h 
 
 
                            JO GAVIESS   STEPH  SON  j WINNEBAGO  IiOjNEjI

 
 
                                 CARROLL   O°GLE    I . 
                   E.£ 
 
                                      HI ESIDE  !  '--;- 
 
 
 
 
               'WARREN I 
 
 
                           GREE     MA -C --N 
 
 
 
 
 
                                   EHEN      MY         ,.6ERY 
 
 
 
 
 
                          -K ISLAOND- 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                   S-..-   -- .I                Lo ITM '1 NW,  - 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                             MAPERRY  A  LINGI 
                         END RO~i  rUSON 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    RAND M'NALLY                                T              IE 
                                           A 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
LETTER SIZE OUTLINE MAP                          ONA N    H-SON.1 
   ILLINOIS 
                                    GA~-- i-?nA 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
           SCALE           SO                         ULASKI M* S 
                  I011     GE 49        IN/ T 
                    MAP0-MAR )_N.0.A 
 
 
CHENRY %f 1AKE 
 
 
 
(KANE ~COOK 
 
 
        OUPAG I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 161RUN6Y 
 
 TI~ 
 
TON 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   rC4AMPAiiGN 
     f- 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   jUMOEGLANS 
   -I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   CUMERY   N 
 
 
       R_77ICHLA 
 
 
WAYNE       F 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SALINE dGALLAJJý 
 
 
 
iOE  INAiGH4 
 
 
The Law Prohibits Copying or Reproduction by Any Proces for Personal Use
or ReA5I4 
 
 
KAKEI 
 
 
01S 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
L R 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
RAWR O6 
 
 
 
 
WABASH 
 
 
I m 
 
 
I- 
                                      a -994.1 Par 
 
 
° 
 
 
d 
 
 
0 
 
  

					
				
				
 
/ 
 
 
Prelimird y sketch cap of -!acial moraines of I11ino-1 - 129 
   3ub.jeet to revieson accordinr to stdies In prorese 
 
 
  MAP OF 
ILLINOIS 
 
 
Legend of Wisconsin Lorain, 
         fS Lae Border 
Liddle   I   moreinic eystem 
\isconsini? Val;.Uraiso norainis 
         Sainooka meoraire 
         5 Larseilles morainic system '3 
4rly       14Bl0in~ton morainic system 
W'ieconsinl Chaj~ai&n iorainlc system 
          D Cerro Gordc moraine 
          Ihe yville L-craine( outerc.ost) 
 
 
or       4GFr 'A Fek 
 
 
ý.* - .- 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
r= 
 
 
  MAP OP 
ILL! NOIS 
 
 
Legend of iconn     rain 
 
         (8 Lake Border 
dd1e     I  morainic y.Byoem 
s1ene1n    a aY ra1 iEo mrianie 
 
          5 Linooka -~onaine 
          rb Larseiles morainic Z~stemi 
ýýrl~y   14 Bjoo,ýin  on, monainic system   " 
     Wi~conln h~ai ra1n~c system 
             erro ;ordc mraine 
         1 Lelbyville  oraine( outer-ost) 
 
 
L..   ý-     f~ 
  0I* M.ewt, 
 
 
- * U 50 30 
     - - MP.. 
 
 
.7K 
 
 
"I 
 
 
I         , 
 
 
I 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
   Bubject to revis on aco in. to studirs  n i roz ren s 
.,f t ,r  Lye ru ,tt,  L, i _t. t c) I "   ook,  an  otss r~ - Lx C.
- :. -,l  1-  r 
 
 
       N~j~ie  f z 
 
M1P  A      E 
       Ol 
OLE GI L E 
 
1, LI X0 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          RI TERSALLN 
 
 
                 GRUNDYA 
 
 
   D~i see -R G" A"I - ..I . ..\- 
       s0co s' -F   A1ýTRIE L 
 
       t     F-    m  - ý ~.L E 2., 
 
 
       ' ,   I -I     I *~.1- 
 
 
 
 
                     " " N O 
   0~r 0r t00 I eEFAI a  SEYL 
               T-      " 
 
 
 
    SLaae Border   -- .r E  " 
.le c oe in j  1]   V alpara iSoe e   orl o ia n ic  .  . " 
 
   (5 Larsejillee morainic system  *  I 
.rly  4Bloeeineton morainic system  '". 
 
 
                     (L  - 
 
 
- - H, *0 SO *0 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Lo 4*Polt    E 
 
 
     1ANCOCI 
 
 
 
'ADAMS 
 
 
 
 
   PIKE 
 
 
   Ro.mbmt SMf 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   RAND MýNAI 
LETTER SIZE OUTLI 
 
   ILLINO 
          SCALE 
    9s~    U  U I 
Cop.'ight by Rand Mvfwly & Co 
         MADE IV ITf. 3. A. 
 
 
Key.. zr 
 
 
Al 
 
 
                      - -CHRISTIAN T- 
 
 
-    R      MA C U P I T IT 
                   MONTGOMERY F 
 
 
 
 
          MOST. CBf ASIGOND i 
    -)A 
 
 
MONROE\- 
 
 
4LY 
NE MAP 
 
)Is 
 
 
mpany, Chicag6 
 
 
2 L P 1     .RI 
WOOLP" i PFRY 
 
 
1iEi 
 
UNII1 
 
 
   -4MM 
 
 
                HELEE 
 
                1iURY EAU 
 
 :RERjI 
 
          KNOX          MAIZ~. 
 
 ji,         ~), *u 
 
RSOAL  r[ uLioN1 
-1                      TAZEWELLi 
 
iM,,-- DONOUGH             -    -r 
 
  I             I    i i 
 
 
 
 
  -- --   A ' -'- SAN G A M O N 
 
 
     -SALINE G-aLLAii-g 
ASON 
 
 
   WOW  P rE HAROI 
 
   -TMi5. 
 
 
JO4 DAVI.E SS STEPHENSONi  0 I4~3 
 
 
          ýZR6 I OGLE  __ 
        CAROO__ 
 
 
dI 
 
 
---fch 89*             ffir 
 
 
I               I 
 
 
I- 
 
 
F 
 
 
I 
 
 
      1 K   j-  - 
 
 
 
    SIR( 
 
 
M LEA 
      PIATTI 
 
 
  LIVINGSTON 
        I HAMPAIGN 
 
 
  _r: 
 
 
 
L.l 
E   -I    DULAS 
 
  x         - 
         CUMBERLAND 
     Aifi~ Mi- TJASPER, 
 
 
 
)N 
 
     F[iiWE 
isON I 
 
 
      S     WHT E 
 mur  9H& 
 
 
GIs 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
LiK        l 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WABASH 
 
 
NKAKiEE 
 
 
90  ft.& W"t 
 
 
= -a- -f*AKE * 
 
 
T 
 
 
0; 
 
  

					
				
				
 
,     I 
i        w 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   .     j 
 
 
           I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
      L~Lz 
  ii" N 
 
 
V " W     X     Y  Z 
 
 
I 
 
 
;-----(I - I  ---- 
     I      I 
 
         fa2 
       ......... .... 
 
 
2 
 
 
a 
 
 
4 
 
42 
 
5 
 
 
(3 
 
 
7 
 
 
10 
 
 
L1 
 
 
:P2 
 
 
is 
 
 
 
14 
 
 
xf 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          IH 
 
Aap H. 
          I 
 
 
    10) plan ted in 1.913 
    ( See it  -IR i- list) 
    etab1 isbnent 
 
    Sestabibment of birds 
    aptpearil in 19?U. (See 
_-_   t e . _L ni. t). 
 
    10 planed in 1920, but 
    failed 
 
    IOXO 
 
                91, 
gets 
 
 
x 
 
 
S- 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
  

					
				
				
 
DtAmA4E REGLANATION MAP 
 
   ILLINOIS 
 
 
--a- 
-a--- 
 
  

					
				
				
 
's 
 
 
Lah k A'~,, ., 
 
 
   StAll b.A. SVfl OP.         A 
 
DRAINAGE RECLAMATION MAP 
 
    ILLINOIS 
 
             '-"    FulAow - 
 
               - £'VL OStt'. 
 
 
          III',                 p 
 
 
e t'to IlS 
 
 
-      rz       - 
 
 
09 
0 
 
  

					
				
				
 
6klt& sawI 
 
 
I¶AAv A  5 
 
 
YLA ~ &J O 2 Cýu 
 
 
viw ~ ~ ~ A~& pwL 
 
  

					
				
				
 
          Map A. 
 
 
 
        GausS e sury of 
 
 
 
Ald Leopold       N*y 1.~ 1929 
 
 
(3.,-. map fromn To' 
"Third Report on 
urvy of J111uo 
 
 
Redt Now Drtt Pr 
 
Due:a old Drift P 
 
Purple: Lose* Pr. 
 
Slacki Rive Brea 
 
 
ý I 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                       Table D.--Queil census and kill, Illinois

 
 
                                                                   Population
                          Kill 
                                                         ----------------------------------------------------------------------

                                                                        
                  .......... ...........................----....................-------------

       Observer - Place - County     :Acres e:  Year   :Oovies:Per covey:Birds:Acref
per bird: Kill :Acre" ier bird:Fer cent 
 ----------------------------------   ------- -.  --    ------ - ...... 
                   -        --------------- ------- 
 
 0. F. Mansfeld, Jr.                 :  435     1907       8           :120:
      3.6 
 
 Preserve (owned), Green county      :       :  1926   2 21   :        :315:
      1.4 
 
 Leased                              : 24uo  :Pezt ye-r :     :         
    2             :  130   :. 
                                     --:       -.ver.e:       :        :
    :             :   uC4.c 
                                               S..                      
                                    o 
 N. R. Huff                          :  040 : 10. years   5             
 7 : 75 : ý.X     :       Clos d to huntir 
 
 Farm, Hamilton county                    (This is a sample Af unrroduct
Iva cuuil lnd.) 
 W-yne county                           1 10 :Seeral yrs. 3  :         :
45:       0.3     :   ?   :         I 
 
                                     : (This is the heaviest stocked r~nze
Huff cnowse of.) 
                                     -                       ---------  
                   -   -:-- - -:----        - 
 H. J. Bowaan                        : 220  :.  121    :  4  :    20   :
tu :      2.7     :Cloeac to huntin. since i21. 
 
 Fairmont property, Mauison county   :      :   1924   2 50  :    20   :1OG0
U     0.2    :Always fed in wintcr. Killed 
 
                                     -      :   1928     15  :    20    300
2      0.7    :P fe7 cats. 
H.-----------------                  ---------- -o--an        -----     
    ----------------- -------------- ------- 
H. J1 Bowman                           115      1916     12  :    20    240
      0.5 
Kirsch property, Maaison county     :       :   1928  :  1   :   20   : 306
        -.3   :   i00  :     ii      :   29 
 
                                            :Best year   1 8     20   :3n
        0.3         250        C -5    :   70 
                                                                        
                 :(Fed in winter. Ten cats     er yr. 
John M. Olin                           150     1925   :   9  :   2    : 1
         .g :   :   1-   :     1, 
 
Kitrsch and ,Art of Fairxont property          1996 t     9      20     180
I     C.d     :   1          1. 1       a0 
   Madison county                   :                                   
                           : 
                                               1927   :  9   :   20   :i8O0
       ..     :  1    2      1.0     :   T 
 
 
                                                    I                   
: -er                           year 
 
 Ed. L. Ka:ner                           29     1929      4             
                     Closeo for yerre. Fed 
 
 Ksnaker homestead, Union county                                        
                           w :in:ters. 
 -- - - - - - - - - - - - ---- - - - - - - -.  -- - -.-- - - - - - - -- -
- - - - - - - - - - - - -   - - - -:- - - - -- - -:- - - - 
 D. R. Abern'thy                                1 i l)26 : 13     12   2
156       6 6.4 
 
 Lawrence county                     :This is rverane Lawrence county quail
country.) 
 
                         ------------------------------------ ------- ------------
  ------------ -------- ------------------------ 
 C. E. Huff                            160      1928   2  5 :     15   :
75        2.1     :   35  :     4.0     :   50 
 
 Elder Lee farm, Clark county        2                                 2
   .                (A little better thvn averp5e.) 
 
                -------------------   ----    --------         ----     
     --------------        ------------ : - - - - --- 
 0. E. Huff                       *    160      1927   :  5:      15   :
7         2.1 
 
 Edgar county 
 -----------------------------                          --------        
    -------        -------------- -----:--- 
 M. V. Baker                         . 640      192S  :   5 :     20    100
1      6.4    :No shootiný Allowed. (Thinks 
 County pl~ce. Peoria county (14 miles                                : 
                 :this is P little better than ýtv- 
                                                a                     .:erpre
of locl cusil rtnse.) 
 
                                                                        
                 :At lesst: 
Frederic Leopold, 1 ti. south of Hopper: 160   1928   :   8  :   20   : 160
      1.0     2    60  : 
 
Henderson county                                                        
                 :This is a sa9mle of the beet 
                                                                      H en
u:                      ranve. 
                                    :(i/3 cult, 2/3 brambly slashed timber.
Been heavily triped. Fox but no cats.) 
-                                    -       -          ---- ---------  
    - .....               --------------- ------- 
Tm. Eroniger                        .. 350  :  1928   :      :        : 500
:     0.7     :No shootiný allowed. (This is a 
                                                                        
                 :sample of the best range. 
Tom Gilbreth farm, Henderson county 
-----------------------------                           --------        
    -------        ----------------- -------- 
L. C.. . . .C a d e . . . . . . . . . . ..t. . . ..:         *          
  : 
 
L. C. Dadent                            g      1928   :  4   :   15   : 60
:      1.3     : (Brushy land, smell fields) 
Dadent farm, Hancock county                 :               24 survived winter

---------------------                 ---    ------- ------------------ 
   :------------           ----------- 
 
Kenneth Knowlton                       160     192    1  3 :     12     36
       4.5     :This is a sample of the best 
tephenson county                    *      :          :     :         : 
  :              :stocking in this county. 
                                                                        
                     :Fe 1. ,ne        2lr 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
               Stepenso cont 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Table D.--Quwil census and kill, Illinois 
 
 
                                                                       Population
                           Kill 
      Observer - Place - County        :Acrep~e:  Tear    :Oovie$:Per covey:Birds:Acrep
per bird:  Kill  :Acre" ier bird:Per cent 
 
F.F.    oansfeld, Jr.                    415        :        :          
    120 :      3.6 
Preserve (owned), Green county         :          1926      21          
  : 315        1.4 
 
Leased                                  24u    :          :      :      
  :     :              :   30: 
            ----------------------------------  ----  ---------- ---------
         -------------- -------- -------*:------O          4----- 
 
N. R. Huff                             : o40   : 10 years :   5  .      
  .  75 :                       C.u :loaad to huntirn 
Farm, Hamilton county                       (This is a sample of un.roductive
 uý,il 1,nd.) 
W~yne  county                             10   :-.eral yrs.   3  :      
  :  45:       u.3            ? 
                                         (This is the heaviest stocked ran
e Huff       nows of.) 
 
H. J. Bowman                             220   :  1921    :  4   :   20 
  :  0 :       2.7     :Closee to huntin;! since 1521. 
Fairmont property, Madison county              :  1924    : 50   :   20 
  :iOOO :      0.2     :Always fed in winter.  Killed 
                                               :  1928    : 15   :   20 
  : 300 :      0.7     :a few cats. 
-------------------------------------------------                       
         ----------------------- --------------- ---- 
 
H. J. Bowman                             115   :  1916      12   :   20 
   240o:      0.5 
Kirsch property, Mauieon county                :  1925    : 15   :   20 
   360 c      0.3      :   1W0  :      1.i     :   28 
                                               :Beet year : 19   :   20 
    360 .      0.3     :   250         0.5     :   70 
                                                                 .      
  .     .              :(Fed in winter. Ten cats ;er yr. 
 
John M. Olin                             150  :   1925    :  9   :   2. 
  :18   : '.           :  15'   :      1..       : 
Kirsch and ,nrt of Fairmont property   :          1926    :  9       2 20
  180 :      0.8      :   15>  :      1.      :   80 
   Madison county                              .          .      .      
  .      . 
                                                  1927   :   9   :   20 
   18o0:         .     :   15-         1.0     :   10 
 
 
Ed. L. Kanaker                            29 
 
 
:                 ..              .              :Fed In wnter.   Kil±le
b-10 oats 
                                                            :er year 
 
    1928       4       15   :  60 :      6.,     *   '1os   for yeare.  Fed

*                           .     .              .         awinters. 
 
 
Kanaker homestead, Union county                                         
           : 
 
D. B. Abernathy                         100u  :   1)26   :  13       12 
   156 :      6.4 
Lawrence county                       .            (This is overage Lawrence
county quail country.,) 
 
C. E. Huff                               160      1928       5:      15 
    75:       2.1      :    35         4.0         50 
Elder Lee farm, Clark county           :                                
                          (A little better then average. ) 
 
C. E. Huff                               160   :  1927    :  5:      15 
 :  75:       2.1 
Edger county: 
----------------------------------------- --------------                
  .--   .------------------------ ---- 
 
M. M. Baker                              640   :  1929    *  5   :   20 
  : 100 :     6.4      :No shootinr nllowed.  (Thinks 
County plie   Peoria county (14 miles                            :      
                       :this is P little better than iv- 
   West p1 Peor   a  c.out:                               :      .      
        .              :erase of locl quail rmnre.) 
     -----------------------.----------.----.-                   -----------------:----------------

                                       *       .          .      .      
  .     :              :At least: 
Frederic Leopold, 1 ml. south of Hopper: 160   :  1928    :  S   :   20 
   160 :      1.0      :   60   : 
                                                                        
                       :This is a sample of the beet 
Henderson county                                                        
                       I        rsn~'e. 
                                       :(1/3 cult, 2/3 brambly slashed timber.
      Been heavily trnp,ýed.    Fox but no cats.) 
-----------------------------                      ----- ----- -----    ------
                -----     ------------ ---- 
Tm. Kroni~er                          .. 350  :   1928   :       :      
 : 500 :      0.7      :No shootinr allowed.  (This is a 
                                      *        .         .       .      
  .     :              :sample of the best range. 
Tom Gilbrath farm, Henderson county   *        :         :       :      
 :      :              :         2 
-------------------------------------- - .......          ------ ---------
---.....- - -. ------ .-- -   ------------    -------- 
 
L. 0. Dadent                              g o0 :  1925   :   4   :   15 
  : 60 :      1.3      : (Brushy land, small fields) 
                                       *                     : *        
       :         :           : 
Dsdent farm, Hancock county            :-       -        -      24 survived
winter                 * 
--------------- ------------         --  --- ------       ---------     
  .--   .---------.-----         ----------- 
 
Kenneth Knowlton                      :  160  :   1928   :   3  :    12 
  : 36 :      4.5      :This is a sample of the best 
                                      *        :         :       .      
 ,      .              :stocking in this county. 
Stephenson county                      :      :          :       :      
   : 
 
  

				
      
      
				
				
 
Aldo* 
      I was taught to fish, hunt and trap by my grandfather 
(David Allen Dryer). His stomping ground was the Kankakee 
and the Kankakee marsh from 1845 to 1905. he killed deer 
and turkeys there until after the Civil War. His cronies were 
his brother Wheeler and Henri de Moss of Momence, Illinois. 
 
      Grandpa Dryer (1818 - 1908) managed to teach me to 
knit nets before I was ten years old, but he gave up teaching 
me to trap Indiana foxes because I wasn't as smart as they 
were. He witnessed the mass migration of the gray squirrels 
about 1828. With other boys he waded into the Ohio RiVer 
near Cincinnati and knocked them in the head with clubs. 
                                    D. H. T. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
       DEPARTMENT OF                                         BOARD OF NATURAL
RESOURCES 
  REGISTRATION AND EDUCATION                                     AND CONSERVATION

  FRANK G. THOMPSON, DIRECTOR                                 FRANK G. THOMPSON,
CHAIRMAN 
        SPRINOFIELD                                          BIOLOGY   WILLIAM
TRELEASE 
                                                             FORESTRY . .
EZRA J. KRAUS 
                                                             GEOLOGY   EDSON
S. BASTIN 
                                                             ENGINEERING
 LOUIS R. HOWSON 
                                                             CHEMISTRY WILLIAM
A. NOYES 
                                    STATE OF ILLINOIS        UNIVERSITY OF
ILLINOIS- 
                                 DWIGHT H. GREEN, GOVERNOR      PRESIDENT
ARTHUR C. WILLARI& 
                     STATE NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY DIVISION 
                               THEODORE H. PRISON, CHIEF 
                                      URBANA 
 
                                                    84ptqnbeY7, 194w 
 
 
 
      44 Nw Agieultur 
      Dewr D. Wod 
                Z sha    attpt to write out son* ot my impessions about 
      th proposed Kankakee Marsh project in answer to the questions whieh

      you raise in you letter of August 25, as wel as to some which 
      occurred to ne while reading the pmp*t, "The Old Kakakee. 
 
    0f par of thsankalise Mtarsh Is to be restored and put 
      0 into ble    e      p forth sake ofwi       fe ad public rereation,

      sponsoring or        isations wud do we      to xake use of th  exer-

      isms, gained on a nuber of similar enterprises In neigt  oring states

      Th mai n thing is to make a sgeerl plan that will    pamleh t 
p      poii    purposee of the projeat over a long period of yew, an 
 
                The period of acquisition " development of suoh areas

y           ly extens over ten or twty years before they reach their 
      Sfusefulness. When they we anisterd by orgmnizations in 
      which. the responsible beads ebange* every few years, the oontlnuity

      of th  project is broken,, nd the original objeotives often forgot-

      ton or set aide to fellow other lines of proedur     that promise 
      quicke re tuns. 
                  Zsee no reason why certain kind of outdoor oreorat te 
      cannt be dove tailed into a wildlife restoration progra eantering 
        arondmigratory waterfowl. There is urgent need for a large tract

      of publily wnd led offering      pportuni ties for outdor recreation

      to the eities clustered ard the souther tip of Lak Xlehiganin 
      Indiana,, very much as the Cook Outy Forest Pre serve system serves

      ChIoago and its sbr*. The Cook County areas are devoted primarily 
      to public recreation sand have clocked up an annual average of fifteen

      to twenty million men-days of it on 3R,000 acr*s in recent years. 
      In spite of this heavy uasge, they have been so well planned and 
      "administered that native wildlife has aIe back in a variety e

      abundance scarcely to be found elsewbsre in Illinois. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
Dr. Henri B. Ward 
 
 
Septonbor 7, 1ID43 
 
 
                If this is to be aa Ind a project with emphass on wild- 
       life @owtio     and outdoo recreation, one woul epect it to be 
       iuist.4d by the state ConservatiOn Coision throu           their div-

       isions of fi and game; forestryj a     state park*, l     an water**

       It seems particularl lptnt that the Idina state park people 
       take a hand because  have an exellent reputaion for opable, 
       long-sihted administrtion in mtters ooneeming publ        rcreatiou

       in the state Wks. 
                The migratory waterfowl prga  on the K~nakee, aeaes hould

      be cooinated    th the nation-wde syste of fugs by seeking te 
      help of the waterfowl people of the U. 3. Flab and Wildlfe Service.

      They have been conpicuously ouossful with tbo Chautauqua Waterfowl

      Refe on t    Illinois River wher ocoesionally on .000 &eres of

      watie, more than a million ducks ata ti e have been oansusd during

      the peek of the autumn flight. On this swas area the trapng and 
      oommercial fishing privileges are sold each yvar and, In edditinit

      S furnishes 10,000 to 15,000 s.4ays of th beat angling to be found

      in the setato 
               As you say departmnts of conservat ion "are still some-

      0 what Influened by oter considetics than those whih tunelie 
      cionsevaion. In this respects the Indiana Dear tment of Conserva..

            tion ~ ~   ~   ~   O Iprbbynbet r o  o worse than thoe. of other
states 
      In the Middle West. They all suffer trom the general detects of 
p     deparment  s     ted by the too eystem. There is a tenoay for 
      them to toy wi  scemes that promee an increase In revenue, and to 
      eater to popula ideas about fish and game no matter whether it Is 
      sound widlfeonservation or not. 
               On the otr hand, the Indian  Dpartment of Conservation 
      through its monthly magsIno, "Otdo      Indiana", its state
parks,, 
         its orotI7 prorm, and its relations with schools and elubs,, has

         goneoutof ts  ay nr* tha most states to enooura, those forms 
      f of      recation    ih do not require the purhase of licees. 
 
                 AlthughI have not seon the governet plean for the Kan 
     kak~e marsh    jeot, the fllowing points eum     iz*s the main features

     of the o   e   e  ainod by vrious    naes in the m            o 
           area  aminin  widlieconservation and rather heavy publio use.

               (1) Area                       ae   ,iho tion area should

     Inclnd* 0     -t*odoanlo the Xaekees River and other 
     adjacent areas, either already nde water or cp1e of being 
     flooded. Sinee the area prooe  in the govermet plan Is a rather 
     narrow stri toh     t   owiginal umash it is important that theore 
     be no shooti         this area and tha thre be bufer strips with 
     no shooting a least a quarter mile wide outside all water areas if 
 
 
2 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Dr.~ Hnry B. Ward                                  S~~bw7 
 
 
      it Ie to attract watetrowl in nbers. ,Tis is necessary beoause there

      will be no largo shot of water moe   ducks an "w.rat" at
a safe d41- 
      tomes from shrt duingR the fall migrtion. 
               The entlie area should be md a gm   preserve om the 
     begwinnin by, hunitg easement cotrat with the option for Ineiniite 
     renewal. or until t  a   ition pro    m Is complete, If this is 
     dlayed until the euge begin, to shw results, there will be a 
     patchwo   ofsecially favord areas open to shooting whih will 
     nulliy Its value as a refuge. 
 
     the use ot the i 
     aer~s that can be put -u r water.  It is particularly Importent 
     that one or more sheets of wte, as larfe as posible   be areateo, 
     if it Is to make a substantial  ntributi     the syste  of refuge 
 now In existmoee       Te anume  of ducks usn  relatively   all sheets 
      of water in this region may be jufgod by the MaQinnee Slough ýateif
owl 
      Refug e near Orland Park,, Illinois,, maintained by the Cook Couty

      Forest ..ewove Dis trict. Here,, 200 acres. of water feunl  aao 
      date 00000 to 100,000 d    at a time. 
    If th              ear~eeoxbows of teold chnnel,, foramed whe   the 
            Xw~~~akoo~5 Dic  a  u, r  loo, they should provided goo 
      fisahing. good. trapping,, and may at trect more watewf~wl than I expect.

   p Crtainly,, thy will be an sessential featue, of the area from the 
      standpoint of public reareation. 
               (3)                        protection will InvolWe the mlain

      toanone of an e Vo44to --ye tern~ of tiw.e lanes, fire fighting equipmont.,

Y nd a fire hting organizatimn. 
               (4)   olq    atro.eA year rouMnd police patrol is necessary

      to preve                      ires, keep the public out of the 
      waterfowl area. 4     the autum mirtio     ukervi     shI   and 
      trapping,, and eneraly direct te ue ot     area by the pubf I. 
               (5)               o                  heaviest load of 
      public use                              " be places here parki
spaces 
      and picni areas are provided. As few roads as possible sh 
      *ross the are.j, and, It is Important that automobilensoudb 
      restricted to established. road and parking rees. Biking trails 
      should radiate frm areas of concentrated. public use for the sonvenienae

      of anglers and others wo are Interested In going fartbor afield. 
      The   sa egurds protect most of the area fm undue trampling and 
      disturbanee, and simplify ts supervision. 
 
 
Septeber 7. 1943 
 
 
3 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
Uepteabr  7F 1946 
 
 
                 (6)        * Fihin    with hook and line can be one of 
       Sipal            o    outdoor reartion peritted on the area 
       alt         number of people particpatin  will be only a smai 
       fracteon ofth   e nubers that some to plonie, hike and 8ightso0 if

       picnicgus nd trails are provided. 
                Thb floodet oxbows of the old channel,, and the larger and

       4eeper sots of water should furnish a suffiolent aoroage to allow

       unrestricted anglin.  In tse waters the important spools. will be

       largemouth bass, orappio., blue gills and bulhouds with a sattering

       of a few other kIns. FormsrlZ, pickerel ocourred in fair numbers 
       in this 0ol   ohannel, but I would not eApeot them to come bask because

       they 4o not trive In small bodies ef dea water so far south. 
       I understand that the Kankake  ith has fair numbors of fish now, 
       including a few wall-oye4 pike. 
                Attempts to restrict the fish population to a few desirable

       kins In any of the ponds may be   elss because  unless I am mistaken,

   C   the wh~ole area floods darin,6 wot seasons* It will also be useless
to 
      maintain fish stocking after breeding populations of the hook-and-line

      kinds have beon established. While it mi6ht be desirable to net out

O      carp, buffalo ant other rough fish as an unutilised source of foo,,
it 
       should not be done with the expeetation xtht enough of them can be

       removed in this way to appreciably improve hook-a4dline fishing. 
                The fishing season and the publio use of the tract should

p     open sometime in April and olcle in 6sptabor. 
                (7)           *    roteOtion, water an food are the 
      ossentials fora susos.eer tIng andi feeding staion for wild ducks 
y     migrating through this reion. Atficial feeding of grain during the

      early years may serve to toll the blrds In until they grow aocustomed

      to the refuge, but the nalnslay of their diot* as shown by the Survey's

      Illinois River studios, is almost certain to be shelled corn from the

      fields for which they will range out thirty or forty mile. The 
      increased use of mhanical cor pickars in recent years has greatly 
      inoreased the amount of shelled cown left on the groun.  (We stimate

      that a mallard gets between one and two miles per grain of corn.) 
                T   acorns of the pin oak (quewous palistris) are reputed
to 
      be an excellent duk food and there are oonsiderable stans of this 
      tree alng the Kkakee in Iniana. Natural stands of wild rie 
      occur in a few piaces alon, the upper Kankakee but the gain ins usually

      taken by other birds before the duck flght, and further attempts to

      propagate it, as an Important tuck food in this part of the oountry,

      do not seem worthwhile. 
                The management of marginal and suberged aquatic plants to

      produce the kinds "  quantities best suited for a duck rofuge
is both 
      complicated and diffioult, oxzept in a general way by regulating water

 
 
Dr, Hoary Bo Ward 
 
 
4 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
Dr.Hor7 B. Ward 
 
 
September ?, I 
 
 
  levels. C   eits probably It Would be best, In the lon  run, to 
  as much water and mar-h as posiblo an accept whetver volunteer e    rowth*

  appear without spendin mu  tim  and money in trying to change the 
  around.  r. Fra k Q. blrose ot our ogan'lsatton is usaly well 
  aequainted with duck food plants under local eoAitions. 
 
           Gesee eae supposed to requre gavel on a well preteote  open 
 shore, or Islan. 
          (8) Wa~fw~otn          eSoting areas sui table, for certain 
 kinds of wate-twl     14 lvt4p.6 even thouh It is not likely 
 that substantal numers of birs will be        ed. Th most pmsing 
 bspeie 4areblov     twal, wood duck# soot, rails, greb.s, mallad 
       blak dck md  amwo oo**. Certain large uawsh7 areas. witha little 
 water suitable for fishing, might be pi      t              year 
 against public use. 
 
           The use of wood dck nest boxes is an effeotive way to 
 increase this species in places wher. trees with natuaal caviles 
 
           A pair of Canada goose is reported to have nes ted in the 
 MaOinnes Slouh Refue in 191p and D. Mileo D. flrwi. has had   on- 
 siderable seess with them at the Kellogg biWr Sanctay near iattle 
 Creek, ichigan. 
          The s8eetaelo valUe of' oderato numers of nesting waterfowl 
 to the visiting publie in this regton Is much greater than their *on- 
 tribution to the hAnters' kill. 
           (I) Tiative Flora and Fauna There should be no predator control

 of any kind exep~ t      -a- nd sate and, perhaps, the o  ry take of fur

 bearers* 
          4hle god biologists may not sseribe to an    nquestioning 
 belief In a balance of nature". It to happens that most predator 
 control masures have either boen ftitle or, if effective,, have often 
 set up a scha of events that aggravate the eonditions they are Intended

 to orreet* %itness the attemts to impove fishing by destroying 
 animals that prey on youn  sh. Fth            b        nu     s a 
 are, so stunted throughincreased compe tition that fishing quaiekly 
 beces poorer than       e. 
          Visitors will try to visualize their project as a restord 
por tion of the historic old marsh. If there is too much evidenoo of 
the man-made and the man-manaad, the illusion Is lost. 
 
          For thee same reason   the Introduction of exotic plants 
and animals Is to be avoided. They lend an alr of artificiallty 
and introduce unknowns whose conequnnees are seldom predictable. 
 
          Above all things else to be avoided on the area, especially 
if It is to be open to the public, to the artificial propagation of gsame

or fish. The oontributions of this prastices to the kill of game and 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
Dr . Henry B, Waruetbr7 14 
 
 
fish is not only questionable In the eyes of almost every exprienoced 
wildlife tehnician, but it gives oncrete support to what sees to 
be a growing popular miasoneotionj 1.0., tbt our native wildlife has 
be*m        nt and, even if   ft alone under favorable oondit ions, 
is incapab let managing Its affairs in an orderly manner. 
          (10)         ,             e     The proo-,ed Knkakee 
Marsh resteration proe         olse      to t with hotels and 
restaurants that tiere is no need to provide visitors with lodging, 
"meals or refresxhnent on the premise.. it woAld be & fatal error
to 
consider any plan whieb would allow ths o nstruction of oottages on 
the area, or the creation of a resort atmophere. (i the oontmary, 
it would be well to forestall the development of this abuse 4King 
the aaquisitiun period by a clause in the hunting easement contracts, 
mentioned earlier. 
          Tie buildings, alone, take away the outward ajpearance of 
a natural area; but what is mvre zeaious, oottager. on such publlo 
land& quickly assume a proprietary intarest and seek in many ways 
to Increase their own privilegesand to restrict those of the general 
public. 
 
          It   Is eustomary to license private boats for use on 
such areas. If Were is sufficient dumand, a eoneession for a boat 
livery may be desirable. 
          Trapping must be don* in late fall or early winter, but 
furs reaeh their prime in this regon in ~eoeabr.  This also allows 
tize for most of the duck flight topa s5 and thus eauses lss distur- 
banee on iea refuge. O  other rfgaes it is common praotice for 
selected trappers to harvest the crop on a share basis. The estInates 
of the fur yield given in the pamphlet ae a good deal Ligher than our 
people are able to figure it. 
          To sum uw, It seems feasible to oombine outdoor reereation 
with wildlife sonservation on a rostore4 portion of the Kankakee 
Marsh. Beoause of the special nebds alond "es lines in this looality,

it may also be justifiable as good land use. 
          aut there are difficulties which have not been disoussed. 
There is too much optimism about the wildlife yields and benefits to 
be e*exped, and too muc.h talk about the wealth of life in te.' 
marsh. The restored prtijon  will not exactly duplicate primit 
conditions, but even if the1 did, It must be remembered tfat things 
like waterfowl are not "i iatnists" but eltieons of the entire

continent.  A more realistie prooedure is to eases the pbyeleaX 
features of the area, acoept present day condition,, and build from 
scratch as If no marsh hLad ever been there. 
 
 
September 7. 1945 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
September 7, 1943 
 
 
               The tract bloked out in the govrenmant plan, while coo- 
     prising about a tenth of the or i    marsh area, Inelus most of 
     the sites wher, water can be resoed    I n spite of this, it seems 
     to    40   0 o01   000 ace   in e  te. At pris as low as $40 or 
     00 in acre the cost is about two million dollas.   It would not 
     seem unusual if another million were spent before the construotion 
     an  development program had gone very far. 
               It Is hard for local waterfowl teohnicians to bollve that

     a hundred or more all*s of narrow,  andered oxws will make a good 
     4uok refue. They expct a few duoks in such places, but not the nun-

     bets one assootos w      sueossful resting an  fod ing refuges daring

     the hunting season. Also, even though soveral thousand aures of marsh

     are restored, they cannot imagine that the numbers of duoks bred there

     will be more than a tew hundred, or at most a very few thousand. In
spite 
     of the fact tt this Is Intended as a major waterfowl project, such 
     sa duck produetion would be scaroely one perent of the annual duck 
     kill claimed by Indiana. 
               In view of the exoessive cost and doubtful waterfowl value

     of the entire tract, it-night be better to choose smaller, more com-

     pact areas where broad sheots of water san be created. 
               While some of the observations and coneluslon& given hero

     are my own, many of them reflect the findings and the views of other

f memrs of the Suvey'sa staff. The remarks on public use are largely 
     modeled after thoe practises used an the Oook County forest preserves.

                                     Respectfully submitted,, 
 
 
                                     David H.L opo 
 
 
DHTms" 
 
 
7 
 
 
Dr # Henry ký * wwd 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                      Now Soflg Buildi 
                                                      A~ril 18#i 1935 
 
 
 
 
          Mr. A. W. Pinne Foreter 
          Martin County VCW Cmp57*s 
          Loogoat~e, Indiana 
 
          Dear Mr. ?tmte 
 
                   I knw of no.ubictions on rabits or s1Wire        fr% h

 
            Ther is no single puliction on quil. UA Paal L. Irrinton. 
               Iowa~~~~ Ztt  ol"  M3 owa, has a tortes of reprints which
oixoti- 
            tute  ~ tb             usnw efrnewtorilel on thia #poies. I am
,5md 
          yo    few sape of hi  reprnts   If the apea usabl   to ym, lot

          -e know and I will sen yo  n m ore  Some of them are getting *cae*

          and I d. not like to part with tha wi1thot being mw   that thy
fit 
 
                    Asto phoamts. sto  for the folwig   *Sgesi      for 
 
          mnet ofGt se ~zwtio Lansing, Michigan a. t, 3-93- 1,9  is* also

          juset publishing abook on hR   ;x maeet 
 
                   I   miW* ou have Av# %a Suvy   3M  "Gom MawqaetO

          The biblloab~y in th latter in a readymade list of littmtue from

          which you "a .4.ste 
 
          Smrvqy of IMdiaea.A  eopv of whia ought to be in the Uivruity,
libaj7 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                Ald. Leool 
                                          Ua Oarge, Ge  lbasav 
 
'~5KA~~vL& 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
                     Martin County State Forest 
                     .Prtin County     0 0amp 57-S 
                          Loogootee, Ind. 
                            April 15, 1?35 
 
 
 
 Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
 University of ¶isconsin, 
 Madicon, Wisconsi;, 
 
 Dear Sir, 
 
 I am writing to you in reorards a game management problem we have. 
 
 The Federal Government, through the AAA, is purchpsin"g 40,OO 
 acres in the northern ,art of this county, and turning it over 
 to the state for mWnagement. We rill develop the area ifom- all 
 conservation stnndnoints--this includes the building of roads; 
 telephone lines; a fire tower; fire prevention; forest st'and im- 
 provement; erosion worK; stream improveiment, incLud~in the build- 
 ing of a dam to create -n artificial lake; forest planting, and 
 game mana,. ement. 
 
 As Forester for this camp T    ia charge of the forestry or~a   e 
 9nd ae   rnbanze:1ent, and as such I am writing you. 
 
 This area, being sub      nl, hvs rabbits, squirrel, qua    and 
 a few ring-necked Iph , "sents on it. Our problem rill be to establish

 all kinds of same cover, in order to improvement game conditions. 
 In other words--do -l ýwe can for the g.me. 
 
 I have received some asterial from the Biological Survey, and 
 wrote Mr. Bode, of the Iowa Conservation Department, for a copy 
 of ylur survey Pnd 25 year lnsn, but he informs me it has never 
 "been published save as a magazine article. Do you have a cony we 
 Light have ? I beleive you gave a talk in reference to suitinr 
 the Ls.e management to the ecology of the region (that is what we 
 hooe to do, as it seems to be the moct rractical plan)--have 
 you notes on that talk, or similpr lectures we could have ? 
 
 This work is presenting quite a oroblem to us as it is e relative- 
 ly new field, and we haven't the time to experiment and judge by 
 the resu ts what the best practice is. 
 
 Any material, u'lletins, technical notes, etc., th;ft -e could havw 
 or use, would be very much a9rnreciated. 
 
 Hooing to hear from you soon, and tharkin yra for your attentic:. 
 in this matter, I am, 
 
       Wool                        Yours very    , 
 
 
14I                                A. WI.. P nane, Foreste..r, 
                      EC (772K               7- 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                             New Soils Building 
                                             October 29, 1934+ 
 
 
 
 
Mr. A. 2. Andrws 
Fish & Gm   Division 
Conservation Department 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
 
Dear Mr. Andrewss 
 
           I do not now the Cause of extra large quail covies 
 except that they seem to acoomPanY extra good breeding years 
 and also occasionally they seem to occur in locations which 
 are inhabited during only part of the winter season, such as, 
 for instane, upland prairie with a great excess of food but 
 not enough cover to carry birds over winter., Sch ranges often 
 show during fall extra large covies, and during winter no birds 
 at all. 
 
          In Mr. Caster's case the best guess I o'uld venture 
is simply an extra good breeding season, 
 
          Incidentally, the question of why covies exist and 
what determines their mubers is one of the least solved 
riddles of wild life ecology, 
          I need your good wishes on that matter of a 600 score, 
since I have not yet made one. 
 
          With best regards, 
 
                             Yours, sincerely, 
 
 
 
                                        Aldo Leopold 
                                  In Charge, Game esearch 
vh 
 
  

					
				
				
 
                                     STATE OF INDIANA 
                            CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT 
                               DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
      Board                              INDIANAPOLIS                   
   Adminisrative Oficer 
Governor Paul V. McNutt                 October 23, 1934.               
     V. M. Simmons 
Lieut.-Gov. Clifford Townsend 
Virgil M. Simmons 
Paul Fry 
James D. Adams 
 
 
 
 
         Prof. Aldo Leopold, 
         University of Wisconsin, 
         Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
         Dear Prof. Leopold: 
 
                              Jesse Caster of near Crawfordsville, in Montgomery

         County, Indiana, was here in the office to-day. Mr. Caster is the
over- 
         seer of the quail area in Montgomery County which has been in existence

         for several years. He reports that for the first time, at this time
of 
         year, he sees bevies of thirty to forty quail. In previous years
the quail 
         have been in smaller bunches of twelve to sixteen at this time of
year. He 
         asked me what could be the cause of the larger bevies and I told
him I 
         would write you and ask you if you had an explanation. 
 
                              Mr. Caster advises that he evidently has an
increase 
         of quail again this year but says that foxes have begun to disturb
the 
         birds and that he hears them give their get-together call early
in the 
         mornings. He is planning a small fox drive. I found a fox den on
his place 
         last winter. You may be interested in knowing that Mr. Caster is
getting 
         about three hundred osage trees to set out on his tract in accordance

         with suggestions made in your books. 
                              Wishing you some six hundred scores and a good
deer 
 
         hunt this year, 
                                       SinoerAlv 
 
 
S Ik/IR                        A. E. ANDWS 
                               Fish and Game Division. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                           New Soils Builig 
                                           Apri 30, 1934 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr. Edint 3. Steen 
D~eprtnet ofBilg 
 
 
Dear Ur. Steen; 
 
         I hae heard of you tho     John 34l, and I m glad 
to givej yo   a sk tcho u   st-up. 
 
         he oveea, eiets1     of nq'elf and 0 ita, Is 
provide for In an endov~t fand Aasmied for five ;rears by the 
Wisconsin kAlumni btea Fntion, W have, wo ote w    n P   sf., 
 
         T  only teaci  consists of orlentation e  a  O   ne 
course is offser    to the short ourse tamr   and anotr one to 
biologicoa juniorc., senlors, and (aLte..   Th latttr i s ftesribo4 
in the attachi 
 
         The bulk of the effort of the Chair is in reerh     I have 
found enoug f  s to a   t  men, one t    a cyle su4d (W. B. 
Grange) and the other a life bhetory set-  of prairie ati. 
 
not under mebu under the Oons.ration Deartment, the Soil 
ZrBsion Seic, and varou        ty d   t   s. I xat only in 
an advisory capacity toward those. 
 
         I am a      a mwin            t  k   of 
resea   prjete we are ti   tb    4 u. T     are a yt no 
publicationis eithosr dsrpieof the Chair or nowigrsac 
remates 
 
         r-he text used in Gam Mn agmne1     va   r"aeMngmn. 
Ro text ws used for the farers curse 
 
           Tbsis pwebably not a compete x~nawr to yrm-w Inilry In 
will Indicate enuhto enale you to com     bad at mefor what~eve 
A4itinal dotails 7. need.     I woud be g.4 to help you In ev 
way possible in buildin up vach wor at Nuis. 
                          Yours sinewe3?, 
 
 
 
                                ALDO LEOPOLD 
       AL/Vh               ~In Mu~ge Game Pleseaw 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
                 PURDUE UNIVERSITY 
                   LAFAYETTE, INDIANA 
                 DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 r-. oio Leopold, 
 Universit   of Wisconsin, 
 sion,  12. 
 
 e   r. Leo )ld: 
             T yre.s interestled r! eann    soLe ti-e aggo, 
tat   ert ent of oade  aeeni t r 1ee es teblised in 
the Uni iv esity o0. -_s4 7si.  T      a  itere st U e 60 in  s ome- 
tThig of the set-up of t-e d    f.t.nt, ehat courses E. Ji-enC 
hor in time Cs T iven i- instructi onl1o-jrk, 'o  T mucIh to ey- 
pe J.. ri e tl.  w-- 'o r ke . 
 
 
1 c(u2Le 
 
(urse;- 
teed% 
thP$"or 
 
 
       7o st     t' e  :r I E) c'      e of 
in Fi.,h c- ee given nh     0g ' -. pere ot 
7iversitT. There 1s       JLpss]1iity tht ± i Y 'i 0  J2e trn- 
thF)e o r est ryT  ýt. ith the, idle: In view! of developingl 
i       (e2anagemc-t. n Conweoueny L ,ouid ii to l,   z 
                  pon        o o r  ttutJons. 
 
 
              i ,[ o u h a-ý.v e In u l t n o a p l t 
t te     'v est-ablishled o&e Ero gement    or, 1 sol 
to oeceie th.Ie. ir               rmation 
 
 
"pertaining 
be -'ad 
--dight gýive 
 
 
Ver; truly yours, 
 
 
 
i j   .f teen 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                              'ýew Soils ThifldInr 
                              Pebr-,ary lh, 1l934 
 
 
 
 
 
Major Qvxm Grant 
Medaryville, Iiana 
 
Dear Major Grant: 
 
         I udlersetad your stubation, laat sinee I have 
no direct coaection with CCC om.os, I 6m not in a good 
position to bring qbout the transfer -hich you desirt. 
 
         It is the intention of the Oonservaation Dpart- 
ment, however, to use, perhps, a hf     ozen ("C  ns 
thl s mer en trout lt anprdvmnt end Ah .a 
restorýtioon. It will doubtless be Avantegaose if the 
coffleera of thee camps are spathetic with 
the work to he done. I P forrdibg your letter to 
Geniral   ph  iel, dlirot-r for the Conervation Oor'- 
mission. He mey see imp omortuwity to ,(t ot yur 
 
 
                           Yourc sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
 
                           In      ,   a e 
AT, l a 
 
 
General Ralph Immel 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
                               STATE OF INDIANA 
                       CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT 
                          DEPARTMENT OF PUBUC WORKS 
     Board                        INDIANAPOLIS                  Administrative
Officer 
Governor Paul V. McNutt                                          V. M. Simmons

Lieut-Gov. Clifford Townsend    October 11, 1933 
Virgil M. Simmons 
Paul Fry 
James D. Adams 
 
 
 
 
            Mr. Aldo Leopold 
            Professor of Game Management 
            University of Wisconsin 
            Madison, Wis. 
 
            Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
                      Several days ago I received copies of 
            papers on fall plantings of small grain for upland 
            game birds and reports on similar work by ]r. Stoddard. 
            I appreciate very much your thoughtfulness in re- 
            membering to send this information to me. I have 
            already taken steps to carry out many of the sug- 
            gestions regarding the planting of other varieties 
            of Lespedezea. This morning we received the an- 
            nouncement of your book "Game Management" from the

            Ciiarles Schribner's Sons Publication house. We all 
            want to purchase copies of this book at the first 
            opportunity, which means as soon as we can afford it. 
 
                      If I remember correctly, you are a follower 
            of William Tell, and since several of the foresters 
            here in Indiana have become interested in archery, we 
            have been ever on the alert for good material with 
            which to make target bows. If you desire a good seven 
            foot stick of seasoned osage, I selected one last night 
            from several I have at home and will be only too glad to 
            send it to you. This in appreciation for your thought- 
            fulness in sending me the papers on Game Bird Feed Plant- 
            ings. 
 
                     Awaiting your reply, I am 
 
                                    Very sincerely yours, 
 
 
                                    6JsphF       1 
                                    61  stn         Prshx 
 
 
JFK:VMc 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                     Soils Building 
                                                     October 16, 1933 
 
 
 
 
 Mr. J. F. Kaylor 
 Conservation Department 
 State House 
 Indianapolis, Indiana 
 
 Dear Xarlort 
 
              My sending you the dope on feeding as a very, small matter

 indeed, but I am not for that reason going to turn down the chance to get

 some osage, I would be very wuah pleased to have yoam. send me the tock

 which you mention, uhiypin charges colleot on this end. We archers get 
 t. be hopelesqly acquisitive as far as osage and yew wood is concerned.

 
              Since .writi you the Biological urvey a     ubl       a 
 leaflet by Grane, entitled "Winter Feeding of Wild Life on Northrn
Fames." 
 This is sound work and it will be worth your while to send for a copy. 
              In addition, you may find gleanins in the following :,ubll-

 cations: 
         "Winter Feeding stations in Michigan." Dept. of Conservation

                Bulletin No. 1, January, 1930. 
         "Suggestions for Winter Feeding Wisconsin Game Birds."
Wisconsin 
                Conservation Dept., October, 19314 (Inclosed) 
         "More Food for Uoland Game." Bulletin 11, Pennylvanla
Board of 
                Game Comssioners, Harrisburg. 
         "Ma    ent of Upland Game Birds in Iowa.   Iowa Ash A Game

                Oomission. Des Moines. 
             Let me hear from you occasionally,   +enjoyed seeing you 
 
again. 
 
             With best regards, 
 
                                        Tours sincerely, 
 
 
 
                                               ALDO LEOPOLD 
                                                 Game Manager 
 
A vh 
Inol. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
      Board 
Governor Paul V. McNutt 
Lieut.-Gov. Clifford Townsend 
Virgil M. Simmons 
Paul Fry 
James D. Adams 
 
 
         STATE OF INDIANA 
CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT 
   DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
             INDIANAPOLIS 
 
             July 31, 1933 
 
 
Administrative Ojker 
  V. M. Simmons 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
Madison, Wisconsin 
 
Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
The sportnee of Indiana will be very much disap- 
pointed if you are not connected with our pro- 
posed gem survey, eve if it is only in an 
advisory capacity. Under the present financial 
condition of our Departomt the cost of such a 
survey should be returned to us by our obtaining 
the opinions and ideas of scmeone thoroughly 
capable and reliable. 
 
No doubt John Ball is capable of conducting suoh 
a survey but his name would not cwiinee the 
sportme that the report as correct and thorough. 
If it is at all possible, in the event that we 
obtain Mr. Ball, I should like very naeh for you 
to act in.an advisory capacity to Mr. Ball. I 
shall write at moe to Mr. Ball and see if it is 
possible for him to start this work at once. Later 
on he could contact you and possibly work under 
your direction. 
You mention in your letter that you will probably 
oonfer with Mr. Ball some time about Aug st 5th. 
I wld appreciate it very mch if, after your 
conference with Mrs Ball, you would let me know 
your decision. 
 
 
INK :iJS 
 
 
Yours very truly, 
 
 
   Fish and Game Division 
 
 
iL 
 
 
0-91,- 
 
 
ýýý ~APVA 
 
 
Ov V.- 
 
 
01ý . 
 
  4S 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     On -,nar  Hac U. the writer mae an In#eation of the Crawfordsvile, 
   C4at saeet   Dmmntratio Area in amvs with Mr. Jesse Cser, the 
 
   Progress ontepoetwa         odu    os~tdrn       b ps v, 
 
attitude of the nw  1adiistratio towar tb proectias theywe 
with reogaiztion woki t      department eA ha nt bada opportunit to 
go into th various inM1vift     vmjeots unerway    Thwe is ton  qetion "
to 
the Deartmet's attitude now bwvrs as tiw are 100% for the project. 
Boom**e of this uncetainty the =Wo and record   of the wor bave L&Co
   *on* 
what. Mr. Cate has prmised to bring these n     to date an  *amit his 
  expnss or te past y~r   ogte with his. estitot of the .nut of seed 
necessary for feed plantings this wpin 
     It has bees a comartively open winter "    bee~s of theuceti 
status, of the wor Ur. Caster did not have an oportunity~ to mal a cosmss

until laten in P*baý wA thenws un able to get ove the =tire property.

At thin tiz of the izpection he had couted 1T3 qaeil on his own plac and

had nt covered it all, neithert had he gotten a repot from the other two

farmers on the project, Wes oop    with 249    W4te on the entire am  In

December of 1932. Mr. Us~tew teals that th"wr a good umbr of y*n 
birds lost last amr bemms tbi aould nt reach water duin the dogt. 
He found six yon bir~s dead in the fields, wia1* he believes died fow want

of waertn. Judging fro *toe  ewb of roosts In evidene vd we west ove 
the ara  thr a     conuiderbl mor birds present than the ==e   ctal 
  conted. A- coulets a om.u recor as possible will be mad* out *m Mr. 
Caster turn In his report fow Us year, 
 
        T om oes to hav been a .assidewablo Influx of prwltors to the amea

and severa hW   bays, been k1le.& At least Uons foes. annow  to be 
workig the aae. and Mr. Caster plan to t     ak staps to roo   thm  Apparetly

both the h~s and the foxe hger. bees a     ~~ same dois  to tie qu,1  Rabbits

 
 
       The wer impovmets ax  cming along In po  sap as originally Wned 
out mdare shwn    results in th forn of addtiona =M*, Tb    traction 
wigtt of wa affrdig exellent cover ovrmoest of Ito length* but Mr, Caster

is planning to UWwov It .14 =k  the cover of a mor peraet     naure b 
planting -om osag Ude~s,   h   ny   We      to mak in the wW of :rvz 
the cover otierthem that al~d mapped ot is a suestion made 'by Mr. Caster

that  W boo* ow oaks whic aregoig to be, out is the late winter ow earl1

spring tow time be feIlled in the tall and allowed to 1V until tim   to ca

   thstu. Both of tne" spe.4es held their lnwes wall and this Ise a
godetho 
of proiding pgoo winter cove in aotherise pastirewou t voodlt. Cove on 
the project as a vhl* ts pr estUg ver  satisfactoril and Mr. Caster Is 
planing to prvd         an aditioasl large tract of movm in tie ferm of swin't

uloverwhich he plans to allow to grw up without cuttinug or pastourig to
enrich 
the soil tor a crp tie fellowing rew, 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Nesting cover along the fencao ws an the specially fene off watin 
aes         to be  dt       well 4    b 
 
    All of the fe patce we  use rgla     th     the winter 
we" ablte1    n    r  to e       b  s     g 
belee, In addtion to th  fod patcs and str      Mr. Caster 4 r's 
wint    d    m*e h  flt it m wfes 
 
    It wasnotic  at oe  it alg    h   trci  rgt of w  whh wa 
  gron u wheril to rose , bahe   thatt  birds bad been feedin  entirely on

oe hips.    is det of th     t r       va apparently b 
a 41arr.tic oouition. iaxtWicated by the 2xteive red cooed droppings, 
IJo birds wo flse        aoIt was trimosble to cleerin. what condition t)*

bire we   In fm this 4det,. Noth  tohe f    WI mn  by a  possibl 
the bids ad bm foroed to sta ud   ov   darig the recet  w a  to 
avoid l$4dn predators* A fee pi,,-tc  wem  cnune here fow next year. 
 
    A. feed strip along the edg of the dazzifie4 fbwest on Mr., Caster's

  fam s Ustryed last yea b7 took1. but it wil be put in   ai '14111  spring

and should be a gret help to the oqswneignthfrs. 
 
    T~ writerwenat ove plaso tow      coin year with Mr. Castew and it 
was Wet that progrss to date vas ver satisfactory and that plans fow the

coming yearwould be ooetime4   lr   the lines prevousl outline w~th *e 
addit~ion of A patches in th  southwst corners of fied nubr        n 
umber 10an an M41itieel feod strip alon    ti-i w2gt of wV ln feld 
n='bw 1ý3, 0*. of thes wiln moan the chnigof the location of a ti

and the other two wIll 'be zw feed plantings to afor better t1istribti~ton

of fod over the entiroaea. 
 
    MV. Caster is to bo *=1tometa on his interest in the prot, =Ad the 
fineresuts obtainedto date. It isalsoeumrgn           onoteitrs 
-om of the ustobori farmer awe takin In learin out food. 
 
                                     jam X. B=L 
 
   Coistol Jess Caster 
         K, it. T~ 
         Hebr L. 
           Amal 0a Ome soation 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                Albuquerque, Nw Mexico 
                                                       June 14. 1933 
 
 
 
Mr. Kennh M. Kunkel, 
Superintendent of Gae., 
Department of Conservation. 
Ind~ianapolis, Indiana 
 
bear Mr. Kunkel: 
 
         Pardon my delay in answering your letter of June 2. which did 
not catch up with me until the other cey because of my absence in the field.

 
         I appreciate your interest in thematter of a game survey for 
Indiana. The obligations on my time will fall into one of two possibilities.

depending on a decision to be reached within the nex month: I will be 
available either (1) about October 1. or (2) not until June 1. 1934.   I
have 
no way to guess at this time which of these conditions will prevail but I

will know by July 1, 
 
         Asnaering your quection about the k    manager: the man for this

position should by all means work with me and kr. Ball ouring the estire

survey,. and upon thecompletion of the survey should become the technical

member of your staff. A large part of the value of any gpme survey is lost

if a local man does not participate ia It and remain behind to execute it.

 
         You mention another alternative: taking on an experienced man at

the completion of the survey. This is theoretically all right but practi-

cally there are no fully exzerienced men. 
 
         I am glad to see that you realise that a fish survey correpoading

to the game survey should be undertaken in Indiana. May I suggest that the

outstanding man for this purpose is Carl Hubbs of the University of Michigan,

Ann Arbor. He did the fish work in Iowa and yo; will find that the Commission

there agrees that there is no one else in the se    class. 
 
         I hope you get the point of my previous suggestion that if you can

borrow John Ball from the American Game Assciation full tire for the duration

of the survey then q original estimate of =s could. be considerably scaled

down. Mr. Ball and I are accustomed to working together and I would like
very 
much to work with him in Indiana. 
 
                                     Very sincerely yours. 
   Copy sent Messrs. Ball & Gigstead 
 
 
Dictated by Mr. Leopold 
but signed In his absence 
 
  

					
				
				
 
THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
 
 
    STATE OF INDIANA 
DIVISION OF FISH AND GAME 
      INDIANAPOLIS 
 
 
          Jun ,ý-( - 1 1 
 
 
WALTER SHIRT 
SUPERINTENDEN 
FISHERIES AND GA 
 
 
S 
4T 
ME 
 
 
 
iid~o LeopoldL, 
 
lourqx uer ue, '~c ~i hoxico 
 
    er iin: 
 in your letter of    {ysJyo 
	
				
 
OFFICERS                                                           DIRECTORS

 
 
  SETH GORDON 
    PRESDT 
WILLIAM B. GREELEY 
  FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT 
  RAY P. HOLLAND 
  SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT 
 
 
SAMUEL G. ALLEN 
EDWIN G. BAETJER 
JOHN B. BURNHAM 
FRANK L. CHEEK 
KARL T. FREDERICK 
  SETH GORDON 
WILLIAM B. GREELEY 
 
 
AUGUSTUS S. HOUGHTON                                                 WILLIAM
S. HASKELL 
     SECRETARY                       ogrMtized 1911                   RAY
P. HOLLAND 
  KARL T. FREDERICK                (ZAUGUSTUS S. HOUGHTON 
     TREASURER              ~I                   1t  * t ItWILLIAM B. MERSHON

                   W(UI4l                                   M         JOHN
C. PHILLIPS 
                       "America's Oldest National Game Protective Organization'
 GEORGE D. PRATT 
  JOHN N. BALL        INVESTMENT BUILDING, WASHINGTON, D. C. 
  FIELD REPRESENTATIVE                                              HONORARY
DIRECTORS 
  I LANGDON STREET                                                    GEO.
BIRD GRINNELL 
  MADISON, WIS.                                                       GEORGE
SHIRAS, 3D 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                          June 2, 1933 
 
 
 
 
      Mr. Aldo Leopold 
      Forest Service 
      Albuquerque, N. M. 
 
 
      Dear Aldo: 
 
           I have just returned from a two weeks trip to Indiana and will

      endeavor to give you a resume of the new setup down there as far as

      I could gather it. 
           Things are still in the process of reorganization especially as
to 
      the warden force. Practically all of the old department members have

      been removed both in the office and in the field. Kunkel, the new 
      Director of Game and Fish, is a very fine fellow, sincere and anxious
to 
      do a good job. He admits that he knows nothing about the subject and
is 
      convinced that the only thing to do is for you to make a survey and
lay 
      out a program as was done in Iowa. Unfortunately Kunkel does not have

      a free hand to do as he pleases. He has no say as to wno may be hired

      as game wardens or other staff positions. These orders apparently are

      all coming from up stairs. !his situation I feel will be more or less

      straightened out in time when they get thru distributing patronages.

      Kunkel I feel can be depended on to play ball 100l . 
           Simmons, Chief of the Department of Public Works which includes

      the Conservation Department, seems interested in the idea and I believe-

      will play ball alright. He is a politician from the word gp but xunkel

      is very close to him and this should help. 
 
           Vandenbark, Kunkel's assistant in charge of hatcheries and refuges,

      is a strong politician but at the sane time anxious to do a good job.

           Naturally with a complete change as hasbeen made in the Department

      many of the sportsmen's organizations have not yet fallen in line.

      However, this situation I feel will right itself as soon as they see

      that the new outfit mean business. Several who started out antagonistic

      have already fallen in line. 
           There is too, I understand, considerable undercurrent of dissatis-

      faction within the McNutt organization which may eventually cause a
split. 
      Miuch of this propaganda, however, comes from the opposing party so
can 
      be discounted. here is some smoke tho and considerable indication that

 
      The Association Sponsors the Annual American Game Conference and Publishes
"AMERICAN GAME" 
 
  

					
				
				
 
OFFICERS                                                             DIRECTORS

 
 
  SETH GORDON 
WILLIAM B. GREELEY 
  FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT 
  RAY P. HOLLAND 
  SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT 
 
 
SAMUEL 0. ALLEN 
EDWIN G. BAETJER 
JOHN B. BURNHAM 
FRANK L. CHEEK 
KARL T. FREDERICK 
  SETH GORDON 
WILLIAM B. GREELEY 
 
 
AUGUSTUS S. HOUGHTON                                                   WILLIAM
S. HASKELL 
     SECRETARY                        Or/ganS d 1911                    RAY
P. HOLLAND 
  KARL T. FREDERICK                                                   AUGUSTUS
S. HOUGHTON 
     TREASURER ~t       t~t   'tt   I~~ttl          t'lW   tttWILLIAM B.
MERSHON 
                    Au'44i4*I4.44I (fiatU-u  Asa        at             JOHN
C. PHILLIPS 
                        "America's Oldest National Game Protective Organization"
 GEORGE D. PRATT 
  JOHN N. BALL        INVESTMENT BUILDING, WASHINGTON, D. C. 
  FIELD REPRESENTATIVE                                               HONORARY
DIRECTORS 
  I LANGDON STREET                                                     GEO.
BIRD GRINNELL 
  MADISON. WIS.                                                        GEORGE
SHIRAS. SD 
 
 
 
      the McNutt crowd will not be reelected at the end of this four year
term. 
            With this in mind and realizing that unless a long term program

      could be reasonably assured a survey would not be worth while it was

      felt that the instigation of the idea coming from thep, rtsmen of the

      state to the Department would have a great deal more =2Tin the continu-

      ance of the program in case of a change of administration than if the

      idea was fostered on the sportsmen by the department. Consequently
a 
      meeting of the I. W. L. Ten Year Program Committee was called and tne

      proposition put up to them. They fell in line immediately and went

      further to recommend and urge that the Departmat have a survey and

      program of development for both game a d fish to be made by experts
in 
      both fields similar to Iowa's work. The same thing will be put up to
the 
      Fish Game and Forest League for their approval. 
            I feel very optomistic about the outlook and feel sure they will

      go thru with it. The only draw back is the question of the amount of

      available funds. As yet they are not in a position to know just how
much. 
      they will have. I believe if this can be put accross it will do more
than 
      anything alse to bring the opposing interests together. The thought
has 
      occurred to me that if they are not quite able to raise the necessary

      funds the ammunition people might be willing to kick in a little for
that 
      type of work as they did in Iowa. It might be worth a try anyway. Ie
can 
      wait and see where the department stands. 
            I am sending you the above for your information as I 1h~ught
you 
      might like to know a little more in detail just what the set up is
down 
      there. There my be some difficulty getting them to take on a suitable

      game management man as they are hopelessly politically minded along
those 
      lines but I believe that can be ironed out to your mutual satisfaction.

            Thank you for sending me a copy of your memorandum to Kunkel.
I 
      will be very glad to work with you on thiis proposition. Jiope everything

      is going along smoothly in New hexico. 
 
                                                            1 .ind regards,

 
 
 
 
 
                                                            JOHN N . BALL

 
 
The Association Sponsors the Annual American Game Conference and Publishes
"AMERICAN GAME" 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                 Abuquierque, New Mexic 
                                                         May 22, 1ý33

 
 
 
 
    Dear Mr. ftnkel: 
 
             I am sending you a rouh ouline of a survey as you 
   request in your letter of May 17. 
 
             If you can get John Ball to ielp me it would cut down 
   tmtie. or enable -s to do a more thoroug    Job.   No worked 
   togoter ini Iowa and uderstand each othier' a methods. 
 
             The big thing is to get di riht    an for your Gw. 
   Manager. If we cou    find another ama like Schnenke. who w 
   traine  as Iowa's Ge Manager. you w      netd only a monh or 
   two of my tLime to get started, plus an ocesinal follow-up 
   consultation. Such finds. however, don't grow on every bush. 
   A survey which does not end in finding and tr4inin  uch a ma 
   amount to little or nothing.  You and your Comvssioners should 
   distinctly understand we are all gambling on this - if we don't 
   develop a technical leader we hqve done nothing. S=h a man is 
   not necessarily a formally trained biologist, Schnenke had no 
   traiiing. 
 
                                 Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
   Taolosure- 
 
 
 
Copy sent John Ball, Kennedy kanor, Madison 
          Gilbert Gigstead, Conservation Dept., Madison 
 
  

					
				
				
 
MAY 20, 1933 
 
 
                         Plaes for Game ;iurvey of Ia4Liaa 
                                   Aldo Leopold 
 
 
A. 'bitlvels of the -Urve 
 
      I.     i  L     . Organise,& series of  me-producing projects,
tob# 
         undrtaken by gorups of farrs, each group to tyy out some 4ifferent

         method of organisia farmur-sporteman reletionships. lhese demonstra-

         tion projects should also cover all upland ge species and combination

         thereof. 
 
      2. jtt   a   . OrCaise a series of             g   project* on preeant

         nd prospective State lans and waters. tobe ndertaken by the Depart-

         ment. 'Xh.00 S    projects Phould cover waterfowl (State lakes)
ae 
         big g   (State Forestds,   exrks).  Th   will inclu4. both refuges,

         ad ( (ewept on State ?arks) public shootiag grounds. 
      3. Tegnct    ,eyi     To operate No. 2, an to furnish advisory anda

        inspection servie t No. 1. select aM train: 
 
             (a) A Gae   an-er (to be part of the eacative staff) 
 
             (b) A Gaze eearch Director (to work in one of the biological

                 institutions of the State, preferably the Agricultural 
                 College). 
 
        Also help these two men make preparations for 
 
             (C) A Gam  Warden Training CQ  (to be hold annua1ly on some

                 one of the denstratioa areas). 
 
     4t          * Write a   Xobok for    armers", advising them(and
the 
        sportsmen) what methods of cover And fool improvements, regulation

        of shooting, predator contro, restocking, eLa., are best for Indian&.

        Make public addrespse wherever needed.In connection with the Survey,

        to infors people of its objectives. and wfat is desired of them.

 
     5. Pianos and Leislation. Work out with the e meutive stttff end Com

        mission the neoe~sary ways to support and gr;,dually expand the G

        Program. 
 
     6.            * ooervti. Dovetail the gm* prroga in so far aq possible
to fit 
        the agricultural, forestry, perk, fish. erosion control. and recreation

        programs of the State. Try to show tUi bird-lovers ard sportsmen
that 
        their 1ltimate interents are nearly identical, nna to this extent
demand 
        mutual cooperation. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
        These eb~ectives   ref fbasic pricple Of the 4me.4a 
 Gter Poiy u They implytum at faandftkJ s p rodu~ction is the f'unction of
the 
 S- all the Depa       t    the por           ian do is to help and en7urae

 the farmer to p*rae. and to easpeasate him in some way for his efforts.

 How best to eo.aease is ons of the objects of the dmonstration areas pro-

 posed utr A1. Ahe idea is thAt ý'he best way will sprea, b      
 ezperenee 
 and liniatlon, until it becomes general, 
       O  the othfr han, the objectives im1PY that migrator     an  big gue

production aM mag        t are at least in part the function of the State,

 
 
    The not result in the form of organizd sreas On whih gae Magement 
sm  sort is being P'ctioed, &igt, at he Qonaluon of the r  , pr 
be about as follwsz 
 
 
   4 quail an Rabbit Areas 
   1 Pheasant an Rabbit 
 
 
   1 Prairie Chicke Area& 
   I Ruffed Grouse Area 
   lauI TkeyA 
Mazsy Wat erfowl 
   1 Waterfowl 
 
 
Fam Groupsa 
   ThmGroup 
St~te-leasee4 fame 
Farm Group 
Stat*-.leae.d farm* 
State eorest 
State Forest 
State Lakes 
Rtflooded Drainage 
(if finds available) 
 
 
Daily Fee heasi 
TOe Public Shooting Ground. 
lilliaumstom Pinn 
Refuge 
Fee Public Shooting 
 
Public Shooting 
 
 
Separate Costs 
 
 
Administrative 
 
 
ky time,  6 mth* 
Ga" 'Maaer, to be trained, 9&1ar 
Prnta Is  a              WA 
 
 
tlngarmers       nb.        V 
financial aid to enoourage farmer projects 
   at start, 
"kesetrch Director (possibly earnied by institu- 
                 "tion) 
"Pri~nting '4w Tey Report 
 
 
$300 
  500 
 
 
$ 3000 
  1000 
 
 
500 
 
 
500 
 
 
b600 
 
 
3000? 
 
 
S 70o0 
 
 
"Could. be deferred till later if absolutely nOessax    ad4 if riht
man is secured 
as Game M~aager, 
 
 
of 
to 
 
 
221raltm 
 
  

					
				
				
 
THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
 
 
     STATE OF INDIANA 
DIVISION OF FISH AND GAME 
      INDIANAPOLIS 
 
 
           My17, 13 
 
 
WA 
SUP 
FISHE 
 
 
LTER SHIRTS 
ERINTENDENT 
ERIES AND GAME 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
c/'o Regional Forestry, 
ilbur~uerqcue, New 12exico 
 
Dear~ Sr: 
 
Mr. william Collins hans give to me yor letter of Kay 5th 
addressed to him. 
Perhaps i sho id e~plai± the situation in Indiana as regards 
the n~w personnel in the depaituent. In the first plaoee 
there will be no political s~rings to be pulled in the employ- 
nient of yo for such a survey asyu suggest in yoir letter nor 
wil there be any political interference rvith the successfuil 
o ~ple tion of t~he work , oncen it is started. 1e hesitate to 
  start any programa in th is state withouL knowing exactly tie 
  objective towards w'hich :e are striving. Therefor'e, it is the 
  coneensus of opinion that we sh d have. u definite pro rzm to 
  work upon. 
  Posszibly you are a are Lh t Lhe Thnds usd in tlis depa rtient 
  are derived solely fram the sale of fishins and1 hunting license 
  and, therefore, the sportsmen of Lhe state a~c vitally " t o- 
  ed in t'e way their money is spent. It follows, raturally, Utha 
  any asJor expend iture mada by this depar h ent sholld have th 
  wholehearted support of the organized sportsenc in the stare, 
  ReaJliz~ing this, we have decided tha~t the initiaJ stoes towa rds 
  haying a conplete surve mlade should be instituted 1. the sports- 
  Sien, %e wiii push the atter but f'eel hict before presrenting 
  is project iwe houid be able to !ay, lefore the different 
  sportsnien's organizations e detailed nlan showing what will be 
  attempted in the sruvey. If yo could furnish mie an outline of 
  your plan of proceedure and resu! sough t along with V~he p- 
  proxi iate eos..L so that I mi hlt present t~ is nlan in a concrete 
  fors before these organizations, I wouid have sonlet' nr definite 
upon which to ba.se cy claimsr for action. 
 
i have s~pent a few days with r.John Ball of he i~erioam 
cGue ssooiation recently and he has promise. to heir in Duting 
this over in any way h e can. 
 
You mention in yo ir letter a. o~u owould 11~   theU privirleg of 
persona~ly meeing ½h ofici K       sponsors of tin job.   ae would

 
  

					
				
				
 
THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
           STATE OF INDIANA 
      DIVISION OF FISH AND GAME 
            INDIANAPOLIS 
 
 
WALT 
SUPER 
FiSHERI] 
 
 
ER SHIRTS 
INTENDENT 
ES AND GAM9 
 
i2Ao Leopold--2 
 
 
 
be very poleased to have you eo~ie to Indianapolis at any/ time 
as no doubt your presence wotld co a long way towards convine- 
ind tie sortsinen of the state that a sudrvey suh as ise con- 
teuplate is one of t'e firt wsise s.teps to~s ar theo establish- 
men of a de''nite policy for the couservation depurtmen t. 
 
I can not ver'y stal go ahead vwiLh plans until Ii co exactly 
the extant of thie su ~ey, t' e probable costs, t' a reslSsI so 1t 
and thea lenuuth of tfiae necessaury to obtain thes res~ults, ID 
yeu co !d send ne the ans~ver to Uh a Liove juestios I will be 
ble to det erlne, in a sh ort Uime , hether or no such a 
aurvej vo Id b popular lin Indianapolis. 
 
Let ire asse you that thea r esend aiirnitrati~on of tha con- 
servation deo artrient of indieuKa is honest in its endeavor to 
pronote. Letter garie conditions in this state and wo ild co~operates 
    ,li e a her of such a   aiv survey to th   fhllet extenlt. 
 
Foping to hear f~roi you promp~tly concern.n~ Ai matr I an¢ 
 
 
                               Yors very truly, 
 
 
                                  Fish and    ae Division 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                   Albuquerque, New Mexico

                                                           "May 5, 1933

 
 
      Mr. William Collins. 
      904 Test Bldg., 
      Indianapolis, Indiana 
 
      Dear Mr. Collinst 
 
               Your message transmitted through Gilbert Gigetead caught 
      up with me today just after I had closed arrangements to make a game

      and watershed survey of projects to be executed by the Civilian 
      Conservation Corps in New Mexico and Arizona. I am obligated to go

      ahead with this job for at least the next two months.   Accordingly.

      any work in Indiana would have to come after the first of July. 
 
               It is h-rd for me to make an estimate of what such a job 
      in Indiana would cost without a conversation with you to find out 
      what you want; assuming that you want just about the same thing as

      Iowa did, only confined to gee. - The estimate would be roughtly as

      follows: 
                  My time, 6 moSo $600 per mo .- ----------     $3600 
                  My expenses- ...-    ..-.-.-.------------       500 
                  Financial aid to be extended to farmer 
                                demonstration projects, ...       500 
                  Publication of findings, - -                .---------

                                                          Total, $5100 
         I am not including in these costs the trainee or assistant whom
I 
would have working with me and leave behind with you for the e mcution of

the plan upon the completion of the survey.   Such a man would presumably

be a necessary member of your administrative forc$V in ary event, so it 
would hardly be fair to charge his cost to the game survey.   Partially 
trained men suitable for rapidly learning this job are available at salaries

of $2400 to $3600 or, with good luck in catnhtug the right man without a
job, 
for even less. 
 
        I am assuming that the work would consist first, in a siseup of 
present game conditions which would simply be built upon the previous game

survey made in 1929 although with tne assurance of active interest by the

State Department, the survey would be of quite a different nature. Following

the gathering of this preliminary information there would be installed a

series of demonstration areas, each consisting of a suitable group of farmers

 
  

					
				
				
 
Page 2 
 
 
who would be shown how to embark upon the production of some particular 
6ame bird. "By shown" I mean the preparation of a development plan
showing 
In detail just where each item of food and cover improvement is to to, the

cost estimate, and a plan of procedure. In short, each demonstration will

be put in such shape that the man I leave behind me can develop them and

keep them going.    Each would also be eo organized as to be capaable of

spread by imitation among other farmers in that part of the State. Sports-

men#* and farmers' organizations would, of course, be made a party to each

development plan and organization plan for each area so as to minimies the

number of subjects to quarrel about after the work gets started. 
 
         To keep such work going there should alio be started a research

project within thn State at one of your bielogical institutions.    The 
survey would include selection of the proper institution, together with 
the selection and starting of a proper man if and when you have the funds

to install him; likewise a program of fact-findings for him to work on. 
I am not including this in the cost eFtimate because it could safely be 
deferred for a year or two, meanwhile leaving off the research factors 
which are being Oeveloped in neighboring States. 
 
         If you went a more detailed analysis I would refer you to the game

 survey of Iowa coming out serially in Outdoor America. You might also gain

 some insight from uy new book, "Gamegana~ement", now on sale by
Charles 
 ScribnersO Sone, 597 Fifth Ave., Yew York City. 
 
        Before standing committed to such a job, I would like the privilege

of personal acquainta.ce with Its official sponsors because so much depends

on the attitude of the overhead organization and the political strings, if

rny, by which they are tied.    Wheher or no you can launch this survey I

hope that an improvement in the administrative situation will be attained.

Please keep me posted as to your possible need for my services.    You may

address me for the next month - care of Regional Forester. Albuquerque, 
New Mexico. 
 
 
Very truly yours, 
 
  

					
				
				
 
      The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company 
                                   Hartford 
WILLIAM F. COLLINS                                               904 TEST
BUILDING 
Inspector of Farm Loans                                         Indianapolis,
Indiana 
 
                                                            December 23,
1932. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
            Mr. Aldo Leopold 
            905 University Avenue 
            Madison, Wisconsin 
 
            Dear Mr. Leopold: 
                        In reply to your letter of Decenber 13th, 
            I shall possibly have something interesting to talk to 
            you about immediately after the session of the Democratic 
            Legislature in this State. 
 
 
0.o 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jan. 3, 1933 
 
 
Dear Mr. Collins: 
 
              In accordance with your letter of 
December 23, I will assume that Indiana has no need 
for my consulting service unless I should hear from 
you further. 
 
              Should there be any substantial prospect 
for such work I would suggest you let me know about it 
tentatively as far in advance as possible, since my 
time tends to get dated up in such a way as to handicap 
jobs requiring any considerable neriod. 
 
 
                           Yours sincerely, 
 
 
ALDO LEOPOLD 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Copy to Mr. Gigstead 
 
 
                                                              Dec. 13, 1932

 
 
 
Mr. William Collins 
90h Test Buildi n 
India~npiolis, Indianaa 
 
Dear Mr. Collins: 
 
Throw7h our mutual friend, Gilbert (ligstea(d., I lhve received yoar Inquiry

as to whether I w-old accept, if offered, the Job of conservation director

in Indiana. 
 
I am afraid that I could not give you any such aigurance without a great

deal more knowled-e of the situation than I now have.  In a general -ay,

I can say that it would take an extremely attractive onportunity to induce

me to give up my present line of conmltirv work in favor of an aminis- 
trative Job. 
 
In tai-kng over with Glistead the pomsibilty that I m.iht be of some use

to Indiania, it hlad not even ocourred to me that any permanent position

s under discussion.   1hat I T d in mlnd was whether my serves would be 
worth your while in orgnilzin  v and trainIn- a gam personl. I  as comn-

silderig only a tep-orary cxxalussion, if a, of the nsae sort as I h.1 
in iowa. 
 
My sugres;tion to 'Ligtead -v-s ha-ed3 on the repnort thati a changve In
-er- 
sonnel is to take place and that accordAinly you wo id hve a lot of new 
and untrained men -io !ould get their stridge more quio1ay if o   red 
some initial advice on a-  finistr;tive policies w ed out in oter states.

I would be interest-e in such a !ictlon, and in regard to my capacity 
for performing it, I would refer oua to Dr. 7. C. 7oone, chaimnan of the

Iowa Fish and      Coniiss ion. Before  miittin   mself to een a 
taemorIry piece of work, however, I wold first   at assrances as to 
the kind of new personnel avail -ble to wor - th1 
 
In short. I am interested in a conslting Job helping to organze and 
orient your loeal staff, provided, on inspectlon they appear to be ood 
mterial to   ork wth, bt I am n2t Interested in any, er mnent job, 
althogaTh I mi-ht become so if it lter  roed that your st te offers 
exce-tional opportnities for accomplishment. 
 
                                      Yours snerely, 
 
 
 
AL/vh 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                       R.R.46 
                                       Lafayette" Indiana 
                                       Sept. 30, 1932. 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold 
905 University Avenue 
Madison, Wisconsin 
 
Dear Sir: 
 
         Mr. D.C.Royer and myself have selected"AGame Survey 
of Tippecanoe County" as the title of the thesis which we will 
submit to the faculty of the Department of Forestry, School 
of Agriculture, at Purdue University. A thesis such as this, 
on subjects chosen by the student, is required of all candid- 
ates for Bachelloss degrees. 
 
We are both students in the Department of Forestry and have 
had first hand contact with game rearing and management, since 
we both spent one summer on the Indiana State Game Farm where 
we took active part in rearing and releasing mallards, quail, 
pheasants, and Hungarian partridges. 
 
We have deemed it adviseable to turn to you in our search for 
methods and procedure in making such a survey. We intend to 
make this survey intensive enough to provide a thesis of prac- 
tical value to the Division of Fish and Game, Indiana State 
Department of Conservation. This Division has already sanctioned 
our project. We will probably be able to allot about fifteen 
days to the field work of the survey. This much time in the 
field would certainiy provide enough data for a good intensive 
survey, provided we are able to work out a definite plan of 
procedure. The idea we have had in mind is to try and correlate 
cover, water, topography, etc. with quail and rabbit population 
and the success of pheasant plants. Whether or not we will be 
able to make observations on other game and fur bearers, is 
doubtful. 
 
Prof. B.N.Prentico, head of the Forestry Department, recommended 
that we write to you concerning our project. We both (Mr. Royer 
and I ) consider ourselves pretty well acquainted with your 
work since we are using the "Game Survey of the North Central 
States" in a Fish and Game course which we are enrolled in at 
the present time. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Much of your method and procedure is contained in the above 
book and also in the current issue of "Outdoor America", but 
we feel that -shou!d establish claser contact with you in 
regard to our proposed project. May we hope to hear from 
you in the very near future? 
 
I shall take this opportunity to thank you for any advice 
and counsel that you may care to make available to us. 
 
                                 Yours very truly, 
 
 
                                    Walter Nic wander 
 
  

					
				
				
 
4 
 
 
Oat- 10, 1932 
 
 
Mr. Ulter J1.mn.r 
1L*6 
t. 
Lfyte Indan 
 
 
           Glad to hear of your project. 
specific questions If I an 
 
 
I1 
 
 
Indanag? I have no exrs but Mr. C. St" 
Park Avne   ew York City, migt dig up a   o 
Ixtitx-trt vimbrs *ih doesat wat to kep It. 
 
 
this witor) 
got one. 
 
 
consefrtion 
 
 
1 ty to answ 
 
 
ma help 
 
 
Sm         a opy of the      S     in the 
mt,         t I     not 
 
 
Yours 
 
 
OW 
 
 
Manaemet' (Scribner,j to be available 
 
 
AlWvh 
 
 
I 
 
  

					
				
				
 
dWii4WiU$ae Jfl 10190 
 
 
Huntington, Indiana 
 
 
TOM L. WHEELER                        September 30, 1932. 
  EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
 
 
 
 
 
                Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
                905 University Avenue, 
                Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
                Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
                                 Your letter of the 28th came to-day with
the 
                handbook for Iowa sportsmen and farmers. It is all very interest-

                ing, and I am going to study it in detail. The remarks on
sportsman- 
                farmer relationships are very good and, I think, give us
the only 
                means by which near-home shooting is to be made possible
for Tom, 
                Dick and Harry. It is either that or sportsmen's clubs and
rented 
                game rights, and I do not like that---too expensive for the
average 
                man. 
 
                                  I took up the subject with Mr. Wheeler
of a survey, 
                our publication to pay the costs; but he says it is impossible
under 
                present conditions. I know The Indiana Waltonian does not
have the 
                money to do the job. 
 
                                 I believe our pheasant-carrying capacity
equal to 
                Iowa's, and that would give us 23,000 birds in Lancaster
township. 
                We stocked 200 and indications are that we got some good
increase 
                this summer. Allowing 10 for 75 females that survived, that
would 
                mean only 750 this fall in the township. Call it 1,000 and
we are 
                still only a twenty-third of capacity. Ie have stocked 100
more 
                this year in Huntington township, which is the township that
includes 
                this city. 
 
                                  In this state, in my opinion, we should
be chiefly 
                interested, after the next year or two, in quail, prairie
chickens 
                and ruffed grouse---all native birds and natives of Indiana.
One 
                game farm this year promises to nut out 1,000 bobwhites and
probably 
                will increase that in another year. 
 
                                 Our cover is very good, but what we need
to know 
                more about is the botany of conservation. 
 
                                 My scores have been low this year, down
toward the 
                foot. But I feel I can still hit a rabbit and in another
five of six 
                weeks will get a chance to prove it. How I wish we had deer
hunting 
                within reach of us. 
 
 
  The Only Farm Paper that Is 
Owned and Edited by Indiana 
People in the Interests of Indian. 
Agriculture. 
 
 
AMAndrews-HB 
 
  

					
				
				
Copy to Mr. Olin 
 
 
Mr. A. iE. Andrews 
he Indiaa Faniers' guide 
itt Itton, Indianr 
 
 
 
       I a endinpr you the new Io" '1dbook on te anýc      et.
As 
you will see on readihp it, it is written for fannera and soort~ien, 
and Oeal solely with what to do to land to uace it productive of Tame. 
 
       It ocutrs to me tht th'  ftre e     nsion of such venture- as 
the -{untinftOn Area would be aided by a similar hardboh for In-Cliaa, 
backed either bi the authority of the     icltal Colle.e, or the 
auwices of your paper. 
 
       In either event, do you see any chance of   arin- u    L fnds to 
carry enow'h of my time to execte ac a ventre?      As y   ]now, I have 
hun out my shiwfle for th t Thind of wor.    The famliarity I gained 
eith your st-te in my ('me 3rvey, p.us the eerieneeo 'ou h yve 
 
accu  lated at   Iti~ton, ourht to me it a rather short Job. 
       HIow is your scre? I fell down, as usual, hrin' the state 
tournament, but a  now bar to norl.     I ho-e to -o after deer in 
Noveiber. 
 
                             Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
                                       AL )O I OY)LP 
 
P .S. I haven't mentioned& this to inyone else in voner state, pendinT
your 
opinion of the mtter. 
 
 
,.L/ vh 
l.nI. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
HOWARD MEYER, Chairman 
    805-6 Lemke Bldg., 
       Indianapolis 
 
                      Zen "ear Tonerruatioin flan Thommittre 
 
                             of 0he 3zaak Walton Cupag 
 
                                         of jubtana 
 
 
   IVAR HENNINGS 
   South Bend Bait Co., 
     South Bend 
 
HARRY H. HILGEMANN 
    Standard Bldg., 
    Fort Wayne 
 
 
        OTTO JENSEN 
        825 Wabash Ave., 
        Terre Haute 
 
 DR. EDWARD C. ELLIOT, President 
       Purdue University 
         W. Lafayette 
 
      RALPH F. WILCOX 
    Department of Conservation 
         State House 
         Indianapolis 
 
         S. B. LOCKE 
   Nat'l, Director of Conservation 
Izaak Walton League of America, Inc. 
       222 N. Bank Drive 
         Chicago, Ill. 
 
 
GROVER PAGE, Sec'y. 
    1703 De Pauw 
    New Albany 
 
 
August 30th, 1932. 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
905 University Ave., 
Madison, Wis. 
 
My dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
                Our mutual friend, Mr. A. E. Andrews of 
Huntington, Indiana, has forwarded to me some corres- 
pondence concerning your concluding the game survey 
in Iowa. About the middle of September, I expect, 
there will be the next meeting of our Ten-Year Con- 
servation Program Committee of Indiana, and at that 
time I will present this matter to the committee. 
 
 
BIAM:M 
 
 
CONSERVATION IS THE WISE USE OF FISH, GAME, FIELD AND STREAM 
 
  

					
				
				
 
August 13, 1932. 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
905 University Avenue, 
Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
     Yours of the llth came to me to-day and I am taking the 
liberty of forwarding it to Mr. Howard MA. Meyer, chairman of the 
10-year survey committee of the Izaak Walton League, Lemcke 
Building, Indianapolis. I am not a member of the committee but have 
tried to keep in touch with the committee's work and did succeed in 
attending one of the meetings, at the state game farm. 
     Just what will happen after next October I do not know. The 
committee has been functioning now nearly a year and will have a 
report to make in October. Whether the comnittee should be continued 
for another year I do not know, but assume that its work should be 
continued. The survey is a conservation survey, which includes 
fish, game, forests, policies, all kinds of resources and kindred 
angles. 
     As to game, I personally believe we have more quail here now 
than we have had within my memory, but my observations are confined 
to the northern part of the state. I have not been in southern 
Indiana now for more than a year. It looks as if we would turn out 
more pheasants this year than last and last yearls turn-out was 
about 9,000. For the first time quail are hatched this year. The stock 
was native wild stock and did not begin production until late, but 
it looks now as if there might be between 500 and 1,000 for liberation 
this fall, The figures I have given you are my figures, not official 
state figures. I feel, however, that Indiana is coming rapidly to 
the fore in game propagation and that in a relatively few years we 
will have some of thebest upland shooting in the United States. 
     I have a letter this morning from Mr. Reckord, mentioning you 
in connection with the sage grouse work. I do hope that some time 
we can find means of propagating our native grouse---all of them- 
Just as Dr. Allen has done with the ruffed grouse after 12 years 
of hard work, 
     How I wish I could report to you an improvement in my archery 
scores; but I can't. You will realize what kind of dub I am when I 
say that my best score lacked 5 points of breaking 400. You must be 
shooting between 500 and 600 regularly now. But I do not use point c4 
aim, as my purpose is to improve my field shooting. I like to hunt 
with a bow. Son and I have a range of our own at home---three bales 
of straw. This about holds the standard target face. I find that a 
single piece of tie wire, put sidewise around the bales and tighteneg 
with a tournique, will hold the bales better than elaborate l1urn buckles.

I do not shoot through these bales as I have done on all other butts 
of the kind. Thought you might find use for this idea. Had hoped to 
go deer hunting this fall but can't make it. Hope you get your deer 
I wouldn't give a dime to shoot one with a rifle, but should like 
Just one chance with a good broadhead. By the way, my choice is 
a toss-up between Harry Hobson's produc* and the one turned out at 
Racine. 
     With best wishes, 
 
 
APAndrews. 
 
 
oe 
 
  

					
				
				
 
301 East Fourth Street 
 
Mishawaka, Indiana 
 
 
                                                 June 22, 1932 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold 
 
905 University Avenue 
 
Madison, Wisconsin 
 
Dear Sir: 
 
   At the suggestion of Mr. R.T.King at the University of Minnesota, I am

 
writing you requesting copies of available reprints of your articles 
 
pertaining to Game Management. I have been working under 1r. King for the

 
last two years and so am quite familiar with the literature in the Game 
 
Management field but desire copies for my own library. 
 
   As a student under r. King I hope to work on a farm game problem in 
 
cooperation with the .41innesota Game and Fish Department and as a resident

 
of Indiana I have been attemptin to get a place on the stff of the 
 
Indiana Conservation Department in case the Minnesota work does not mater-

 
ialize. I had understood that you had s een someone in the Indiana department

 
concerning the hiring of some trained ken and I would like to know if you

 
know whether or not they plan any direct action soon. I talked with both

 
Mr. Walter Shirts and Mr. Sidney R. Esten of the Indiana Department on 
 
June i1l, and they did not think that anything would be done before next
fall 
 
so I would appreciate it if you had any information on the subject. 
 
   I wish to thank you for any literature that you iaay send me and for any

 
help that you may be to me. 
 
                                         Yours truly, 
 
 
(OVA 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
Repr     nVl    ndla   aU :Iu!Sa~llt D~aonstratien Pjro      t 
 
 
        ,,n A-:ril L9, -1932, 1Iinspe)cted th~e Indiaza rMjojct inl 
 uatapsny with Wýaltur ýhiats, Indiana ýu-perint~i-endet
of lftsj, and 
 witti Tessas 'castj~r  tie .voject iatgr 
 
        The inspection consisted of go0ing over tie property, with 
 t:e aid of a fine mp whch the   on           eartent's enginms 
 have nade specially for the project, and discussing Vte gneraI 
 oj:rations to be conducted. In a nuwiber of oases specific areas 
 ware discussed for specifio handling, but in general we did not 
 attempt to bring the actual site of operation into qL.eetion until 
 kr. Castor has an opptunlty to discuss the same with the land- 
 owners, Conseuently, no final plan was drawn in on the map; 
 instead gna       gest ions were mdo end týe completed plan will

 be )ut o)n Vathe  ap after it h1as been execuited, or step, by ate'). 
 
        The  .neral operatixns to be conducted include, esnecially, 
 the fencing off of siallp       of woýodlots which are now 
 intensively §a~ed; fencing oPf cartein fence rows; reserving strips

 alonrg rail fences on ournd that is now very bare; hurchase of 
 strips of crops adjaoent t over   It will be  ossibl to fence off 
 enIugh thicket and wooland areas to increase by tany te     te 
 available win.ter quail headquartors, and in  ost cases these areas 
 can be connected ui by fencerowi end crop stripa in order to increse 
 availability and uso. In a few Instances splec  l cvros  ybe 
 plantd, as sIybeans in   ýsd  con rws.   t   ther cases the last

 cultivation f outtide c-rn rws    be dropped, to ati;late Weed 
 ýýUwth. , lt, in genearal, tie )roblen. i Jn the opleratio)nal
iroce:dUre 
 are conoerned with inaransing thicket cover inl Deserving food 
 crous in usable winter torm. 
 
       The mpw      ie     )a   nt a 1ýzad at consiierable labor 
 Is )robnbly the beat in use ýn any )reeant voJeo. Te attitude of

 the aDreient and the person-el of the ýp.rect are vy jntifying, 
 and con.led with Vtheo iajor advontages is the effort which is being 
 .ade to oPSeate the ,-ro-ject at Vh mnio cost coinsistnt with gorod 
 results. I or. very gld to re)port thAiit te 'Indiaua project is off 
 to a very fine start and that it appoae to ma to core nearly 
 approach the ideal set-up for te quail projects of mny. 'Thatever 
 results are seuured, and resu,-lts seenamos certain, can be trans- 
 fe)rred bodily to thousands of acres now in the samre cnionas to 
 quail. 
 
       On the follow inf' day we Visited titate  u  Re     and 
Gamie ?arm-, near M'Aderyville, where therei are als o ex cellent 
op)portu.nities for future quail, p)rairie chicken and rizffed f-rouAes 
;inanagmwnt. 'The Liost interesting? feature of this visit was the 
&ll pond which the )e artient has   ade, by plu  n  u  an old 
drainage ditch, and on which we saw Aallards, teal, shovellers, coots 
and pintails, and n-.ear which were jacksnipwe, killdeer, bittern., 
yellowle   and a wholeýhost of other birs character itic of pond 
e nviroments. In this little tevalozient of ten ot twenty acres, 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
the Indian   -onserwtjton D)a    nt has shwn what can be don. 
I-Any hundrds of ducks 'har used even this s   all ) Vike h  sring. 
Theear. e thousands Of oppa_)otunitiss for e5iuilar miiall londs anld 
lake$ all thrOuW the mid-"".t cot-ty, and in the a     t    thy

would be fr more effective than large alocKod out ares. far 
apart   o    unde-takings miht aoin-ceiably be mde loal chaýter 
project, for sportln ornganztlins, If the )ro:por leadership 
within the organ i-atli~s could be develo~lle,  At any rate, the 
Indiana De!perthent Is actually turning sod ant' hoe. a~nd sluidlar 
Sa operations              and it is a Plea aure to be in contact 
with p-ublic officials who are doing rather than tailking. 
 
       The now Indiana  trite Ow, Tar, built within the last 
year, is a Tvry modern and i1ogresive institution, with sormthing 
over 1*00 wadirng phesants and a good many quail and soie other 
sý)atee, Its location in the ioart of a very diversified San 
refug  still inhabited by prairie c.ickens, quail and waterfowl 
raakes it )articularly interesting, and the o 'pportunity to do 
field ýuinaent on the native speclee i nnoteworthy. 
 
 
                                Re/,ctfully submi. tted 
 
 
 
                                        "/3/ allace -9. xan~p 
                                          Cooperative Agent 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  ;10"ýo3 ont lit , 16     Ia af, 19 
 
 
 
    -'ate Lts to1     Thj 0d Ct zd~e 
 
 
 
 
    This i a ~at ., -w wo, rtot-Is 1290 the~ ý?jc 
 
*iý    ror wi ll Ix)  o7d 1, )n Viote  par-,m ovdtile qmp is, 
 
 
 
 
crots oq~r toe bet or ty,ý *eoat, eqm tht1t.ot  fs, lof 
      razed),in Vin Aolf" zd~. 0r  , apia  is itw 
 
lotyr in   ath fti, tin ctIo?*,, !-Ut thf311d 
 
   LOW 0te 41 em   .a:Iwsd  tbe  otei  ýIl not isllo 
   an,-o itity*  hit stul~ba field e ont n  V-~ wid  it  i  c   a 
   not ~ ~ se o  l  latq lity Iait  ýV1~,t thee tin..,tL)C Pla. -s
 In 
 
 
 
 be ir noa ro t~s;Rortlwt.)cm  i the aixv1*iut ar.0,W11 
 
 
 
 
 the1 t vll  It -.oxL a0 fio  sa at  o  i10  ie in~a  Conati-,a   a~ 
 bevw ofq~ ssi tVoXmttie h re ýaii      o 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I 
 
 
     w~~~1d, vt o Cot 7. r-onot          b 
 
     ~~ent ~ ~ o !ea11 of r0trc 
     . Ao~ tit. po1T L7 ti M- I r et 
         si1n  ^jroi r"Olo~  t$ t-, rh~  coveraemnlnl-- 
 
 
     2, Q~~oth~icimiot   ftae vý rAil 
 
 
 
 
     to mlp lar un the tl-ick't, cow0r,& 
 
     4.ý ro  tv -tst     ):-t-o of  ooru ý-)  !ON1~1  tw 
 
 
     Le ~ave 3trips cc ~a      tedIaa OOV)ro 
 
 
 
       QfCr o,m etc., 11 o~f !"Jab Aill help t Outecovf 
     ,-, well rls on food.) 
 
 
     ,)Iwi~ 1s c~ bn -tjzel 
 
   Vo. prlactices,, -o.rlc C~ (. Or t  errorat in 
 
 
   -rfab . e  t into efec, IOi tMhs cý u e n wlx   o-ut In detail1

la,,tor on theýrý m with the- sIC. ofý t00 1a"lon.
p,,i 
it it, posibl to t, lk withh  a  rc~s4 
 
         derillo tract,.tl is A~pce of1. hIi 
 
an exec.Z u-t                  ti bof 
thVrea the ro-sytiw '    r adte fiills 
 
 
0  te 0 
 
  

					
				
				
				
				
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
set. 19 131n 
 
 
Mr. Artlrm R. Ma-. rthur 
3rown Oimty State Pregrve 
N1Apliwilln, Tnliana 
le-r ýr. 
 
          I was     nterested to hear that you were on te 3rom 
County  e      ne. an  I thnroughly Lgre wIth you C-1t it offers alost 
end~e~ po~ibilities in       rese ari m. e 
 
          It is diffiult to ma   e   3tions from a distane. You 
et that you detemine sec ratio in wild rabbits tan 
this to n z n,! is an exoellent    etion nd on- over     a -b- 
Jret he'rtofore nntouehed, 
 
          1t i not  l   ro your letter -ipther a: mial are 
beinr trap-pe4 bat If so, sex rattio f.iynqswol be pnarticual~ey 
wvabable since Ind1ian1 i the state from ii   ot reports of 
lee     distrb=an s of the ratio have come.          roiLl ed be 
especially e vah e if carried out thr       eres of food arid bad 
seasions. 
 
          You do not mention tueceys. ha the -tock Ilantad there a 
few yrs zo al! disappetaqd? 
 
          Your pro.poed intrnrio tion of oultivated food Datchss is 
Obviuly in or4er. There is ,,.mh rom for u           in detcrmln- 
In,- -7hat fnood cronq require aý Aninm= of maltlvati-n cost and 2flc

a         of food. also what   inations of food -rovile for the 
fall, wInter, and late winter seaaons. 
 
          Let me hear frol you from time to t   ne, d I will, be glad 
to m.ae any mestions I oan    If you mai tell me the operations you 
are EoW   to conduct anw, T might be able to      st  ork 
Wmll go with thm.   I wold also be -1   to be of a  help to you in 
the nublication of your fýnl-tdis laty. 
 
                                  Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
                                       In      I2.OOl   e 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
The Only Weekly Farm Pawer Owned, Edited and Published in Indian. 
 
 
              F         ihe Indiana               id    e 
 
 
 
 
                            Huntington, Indiana 
 
                                   July 8, 1931. 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
      If you will give us the address of Harry Johnson, 
we will forward this to Mr. Hahus.   That you may u e your 
pleasure about keeping track of the correspondence, I am 
enclosing a carbon copy of my letter to Hahus. We appreciate 
your efforts on his behalf. 
 
      I fell completely dmYn in the state tournament, held at 
Muncie June 2? and 28. I shot the latter day in the double 
American, sitting all day in the suerhine with a temperature 
of about 100 and no shade. I would not have remained, most 
likely, had not a very elderly woman from Kentucky bee- there, 
leading all the ladies mornirg ands afternoon. Her husbanxd shot 
with us and was unursually good. He must have been about 70. He 
used a Flight Daily bow about 5 feet long---first one I ever saw. 
I shot just under 300 for xy best. My osage bow got so far down, 
from lying on the ground in the sun, that I had to aim in the sky 
at 60 yards, and dropped arrows consistently between the target 
legs. My son, 14, took the Junior, however, shooting my osage 
hunting bow, which he chooses over his own two bows for a tourney. 
He shot 776 in the double Metropolitan, Juniorl and got quite a 
hand when he went up to get his prize---a set of arrows that looked 
as good as sticks of candy. That kid may make an archer. 
 
     With very best wishes and again thanklng you, 
 
                                    S in carely, 
 
 
THE 
 
 
AFAxidr~ws 
 
 
More than 160,000 coples weekly 
 
 
/ 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
T.luy 8, 19;1. 
 
 
lir. Alvin F9. Hahs, 
Oriole, Indiluna. 
 
Dear Mr. Hahs: 
 
     Herewith I - enclosing copy of a letter fCrr Mr. Leopold, 
You will note Mr. Leopold %gcets mr. Jol-ni' aIght wtie  to test 
out the trap. I believe it wold be butter 'ow you to take up the 
subjct with him direct, but if yecx wish -n to write hir w    Ie hall 
be gia to do so* 
 
     Plaxps I homeld wention a point that Occurs repxatedly in the 
corrt spozaonce we h ave ha. My f irat imlso was that your trap will 
got the "   hawks a"d not iet the iecent ons. Mr. oopold ant Mr.

Grtuig both doubt this. Thvir poaition is this: That a large hawk, 
which is not a good chic-en oatchor, woaul tako advarntae of a captive 
chickean when niot able to catch one at liberty,, aind that thus the innocent

or lasu      $.v~gng hawk wovld be caught. I hatve th~ought this ovor iand

rather believe they may be right abouit It# but, as 11,r- Grange Indicates,

a rwa test is needed on tiis point. It Is what the trap actially will 
do, not what wo thi* it will do, that counts. The photo you ford4 
showed you. wAi caught one of the mot villDinouu kiid. of hawks, ard if 
you trap will not catah te   lubboerly" hak but will taLe these snipers,

it im going to be a grýat inention, not only for the poultryman, but,

what is going to be mor.e Vnortant, for tho game farm and game pm-rsves.

Thia gme business is growing by leaps aid bounds. 
 
     I ohall be glid. to hear from yoit fuirther, bu~t the raore you keep

your own nme cojnnctod with the trap, the bottetr it will bo. My only 
purpos  is to help you# I don1t want any credit that may alonr to you. 
 
                                 Very truly yours, 
 
                                 THY,, INIA-1 FART Thi' OS GhITTE* 
 
 
Director of servic Burema. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
                  UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
                          BUREAU OF BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 
                                    WASHINGTON, D. C. 
      ADDRESS REPLY TO 
CHIEF, BUREAU OF BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 
       AND REFER TO 
                                                             July 8, 1931.

 
 
 
 
           Hir. Aldo Leopold, 
                   404 University National Bank Building, 
                        Liadison, Wisconsin. 
 
            Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
                  Ir. Grange has sent to me for reading letters you received

            from Watson Hall of Athens, Illinois, and A. E. Andrews of 
            "Huntington, Indiana, which I am herewith returning to you.
In 
            response I may say that I believe we have referred sufficiently

            to the use of sweet clover in our manuscript on the Natural 
            Increase of Wild Life on Farms. 
 
                  With regard to the hawk trap invented by Mr. Hahus, I 
           would say that it has some good features but I doubt that it will

           be as discriminating as he expects it to be. Predators of most

           kinds are ready to pounce upon apparently helpless creatures in

           which category they probably would put live chickens confined
in 
           the cage that is part of this trap. Another disadvantage is that

           living creatures used for bait would not live long exposed to

           strong sun. Still another point that appeals to me is the undesira-

           bility of the control of natural enemies being commercially 
           exploited even if the motive does seem to be increasing the use
of 
           a somewhat discriminate trap. 
 
                                             Sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
                                                     W. L. McAtee 
                                                     In Charge 
           Incl. 0-37742.                        Food Eabits Research. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                           Tucson, Arizona, 
                           June 29, 193l 
 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leonold, 
University National Bank Bldg., 
Madison, Wisoonsin. 
 
 
 
near Aldo: 
            Thanks very much for the oore5-- 
nondenoe with Mr. Watson Hall of Athens, Illinois, 
relative to sweet clover croppng practites. 
We had already inoornorated matirial of this same 
kind in the manuscript of the Firm Bulletin, but 
I am glad to have the adAitional information, 
and am sending the correspondence on for r-aiino by 
Mr. McAtee, with the request that he return it to 
you when through. 
 
              I also was much inter-sted in the corres- 
pondence with Mr. A. E. Andrews of Huntington, Indiana, 
relative to a patent hawk trap. which he has developed. 
I am sending this oo0respondence on to Mr. ,cAtee 
also, with the request th-t it be returned to you. 
I do not doubt that the trap is extremely effeotive for 
almost any bird of prey, but I doubt very much whether 
It would be at all discriminatory. Without having had 
any onnottanity to test it in the field, I should be 
inclined to feel that the tran would be mere dangprous 
if anything than the poletrap, althoug this belief 
certainly needs checking. It occurs to me that 
Errington might be interested in testing this trap out. 
If not, I have no doubt tha4t Harry Johnson would test 
it out at the Wisconsin .Gme Farm, if the inventor 
should care to furnish sam-le trans. If you wou'l ogre 
to mention this to either Mr. Andrews or the intentor, 
Mr. Alvin F. Hahus, I should be glad to complete 
any arrangements with Harry Johnson through Qrimmer, 
that might be necessary. 
                         Sincerely, 
 
 
                         WU B. Vtaijg,- 06-oerative Agent, 
                   U. S. Biologioal Survey 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Copy to Mr. Grange 
 
 
                         Jun. 12, 1931 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr. A. LI.Arew* 
h   Indiana Farmrs Gu-ide 
THuntington, Indiana 
 
Dear Mr. Andrews: 
 
       I appreciate your sending me the intereetin informtion 
about the   w type of trap. 
 
       It ses probable tt a trap baited with live chicks in this 
w   migt be leyo catch a hig proportion of injurious hawks 
than the ordinary poletrap, bt this tendency might nt be as great 
as one would -sppose, for the reason that the non-injurious hawks 
are so because of their clusiness and cnsequent inability to catch 
ge and pltry, and not by reason of any lack of appetite.      his 
is why m    of the non.-njurlous species conly eatch cripples. 
I a afraid that there is little doubt that they would go after 
these chicks and get caht. 
 
       T   high jaw which kills the bird outright is certainly far, ,-- 
Sthan       the ordinary poletrap, but against this would of course 
have to be balanced the larger size. 
 
        I have ne particular opportunities to draw public attention 
 to this invention. It occurs to me, however, that the Biologiceal 
 v     might be interested in knowig about it, and accordingly I 
 am forwrdi~ng your letter and photorp  to the. 
 
        I would like very muh to shoot with you sometime, and if I 
 ever got in your neipborhood I heoe to ring my bow and arrow. 
 
        With kindest regards. an-d thacking you for your interest, 
                                Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
                                        ALDO .,,,e 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
The Only Weekly Farm Paper Owned, Edited and Published in Indiana 
 
 
         -      cJe Indiana 
 
 
 
                      rvaer        Estalie edin 784 
 
                      Huntington, Indiana 
 
                                      June 9, 1931. 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
404 University Avenue, 
National Bank Bldg., 
Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
                  Herewith is a carbon copy of what I am 
writing to one of our subscribers to-day. Mr. Hahus has 
invented a trap, photo of whi ch I enclose, together with 
copy of Mr. Hahus' letter. 
 
                  M~r. Hahus lives in southern Indiana, in 
a natural game country, a territory that could support 
deer and turkeys, where forestry is most rapidly coming 
to the front. This territory could be a hunter's paradise 
if we could get a real start down there before private 
interests gobble all the land up. I recently found 10 
square miles with only seven families and the land very 
poor for agriculture but able to support good tree crops, 
both broadleaves and conifers, including good mast-'producers. 
 
                  I thought you might have a suggestion for 
 getting'this trap before those who can best use it. Getting 
 it manufactured seems to be the big problem, but you may 
 have connections that Will put the thing over. On the face 
 of it, this trap looks superior to the pole rig usually used 
 BECAUSE IT GETS MTE GUILTY BIn-S. I have not experimented 
 with this trap but do have faith in it. 
 
                  Ras mighty glad to get your letter of 1aay 
 28. Mr. Ball tells me you hunt deer with the bow. Wv'hen I 
 suggested that the Kankakee be stocked with deer and that 
 the hunting be opened to archers only, the superintendent 
 of fish and game, a lawyer, told me that would be discrimin- 
 ation and unconstitutional. That is the manner in which our 
 division of fish and game attempts to "big town" us ignorant 
 fellows who are supposed to have no thoughts of our own. I've 
 never gone deer hunting with my bow, but hope to do so some 
 
 
More than 160,000 copies weekly 
 
  

					
				
				
 
-2- 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leoold. 
 
 
 
 
time when I can afford it. I'll have two youngsters in college 
next fall and don't see how Dad can get in any hunting more 
serious than cottontails. ?or two years I have hunted them only 
with my bow. I hope some day to be able to use my new 20 on 
quail. Up to this time I've never bagged one, but to-day there's 
no excuse for not having all of them we need, with profit to the 
landowner and not excessive cost to the hunter. 
 
                 Have you read "Tut Growing" by Dr. 11orris, 
Vac!illan Co? It contains some real literature and real con- 
servation. The revised edition is out this year and your 
library there should have or get it. You'll relish his irony, 
satire and keen wit. 
                 Shot two rounds last evening--337 and 307--- 
not much to brag about. 
 
                 Very truly yours, 
 
 
T n I 
 
 
A1ZAndrews-H3 
E~nd . 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Copy. 
 
 
                  A feiyears ago I wrote you on the hawk 
 question and on my invention the "1hawk trap" I now have 
 it patented and received patent letters Feb. 24, 1931, 
 Pat. 7o. 1, 794,228 
 
                  I have caught more than fifty hawks in 
 the same way as you see in the photo enclosed. Ify neigh- 
 bors have all caught some too. 
 
                  I was In Chicago in April at the Patent 
Exposition. I have tried to interest hundreds of Manu- 
facturers. I am now meeting with opposition and criticism 
such as inventors usually experience. I am enclosing a 
letter from a trap co. which criticises the size of the 
trap from the standpoint of state laws. I don't know how 
many states prohibit such traps but it seems that this trap 
would not infringe on such law because it is set with live 
chicks and will not catch anything except a hawk or crow 
attempting to catch chickens and is only set near the home 
where it is watched. 
 
                 Beside the above abjection I hear such as this -- 
 "There aren't many chickens or poultry caught by hawks". 
 ",There are but few hawks in the U.S." 
 "Hawks ought not be killed". 
 ",Farmers can not afford to buy a trap for this purpose." 
 
                 Others say: "I don't belive the trap will work".

 
                 Still others say that the shotgun is the only 
good method; and so on. 
 
                  I am exnerience in these lines a little myself 
and know some species of hawks should not be killed but you can 
not catch one of those kinds in this trap. My county is paying 
$1.00 each for hawks killed; nine out of ten are the wrong hawks 
but the officers can not tell the difference. The parmless hawk 
is soon becoming extinct through ignorance x\I ialv  a solution for 
this if I can -ut it over before it is too late but I will need 
help (not financially).   My trap has a hundred percent record, it 
has never failed. Testimonials and affidavits prove this over and 
over. 
 
                 I will be uleased to get a few lines from you. 
 
 
Alvi  F. Hahus 
Oriol ie, Indiana. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr. Alvin T. Hahus, 
Oriole, Indiana. 
 
ear Mr. liahus: 
 
                  Your letter and enclosures were turned over 
 to me by Tm L. w-heeler and my interest in hawks, hawk-owls 
 and other predacious birds prompts this long letter, copy of 
 which I a  sending to Kr, Aldo Leopold, 404 University Avenue, 
 'Tational Bank 1tiilding, Madison, Wisconsin. I am sendi~ng the 
 copy to Mr. Lepold for the reason that, it seems to me, you 
 are overlooking a most important thing in modern rural American 
 life-the conservation movement, coupled with forestry and 
 game propgating. Mr. Iopold probably is the best-informed 
 man in the Middle West on game and will take an interest in 
 your trap I am sure, He maý 'ave something very definite to 
 si~est. 
 
                  I - enclosiri four sheets from Manly F. Miner, 
son of the famous Jack iner, who iade a world-famous study of 
birds. You will note from the analysis that hawks are very 
serious menaces to wild life. You will note from the sheets that 
even the red-shouldered hawk is bad at times. The worst types, 
however, are the one you picture in the trap, which is either a 
sharp-skin or a Cooper, and the hawk owl. The latter owl flies 
in daytime and looks white as seen from the ground, and is often 
mistaken for the osprey, I believe. -here are now many of these 
in Indiana. 
 
                 !ven such an authority as Bailey, with a strong 
prepossession in favor of all bird life, speaks of the Shar-skin, 
Cooper and hawk-owl as "bushwhackers., and that is what they are. 
If a hawk of any kind gets into your trap, he is a chicken and 
game stealer or he would not get there. 
 
                 GAme keepers---of whom there are now many and 
will be many more-will take an immense interest in your trap 
I believe. The best thing they now have is the pole trap--- a 
pole set in the ground near game with whitewash sprinkled over 
 
 
Jun 9, 1931. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
-2- 
 
 
mr. Alvin r. Kahus. 
 
 
 
the ground near to represent the droppints from birds. On 
top the pole is a Pma1l trap. This trap gets results very 
often, but I think yours is better. lie pole catches the 
innocent hawk; your trap gets the guilty one. 
 
                  If departments of game in the various states 
get interested in your trap you may depend on it that it will 
be used; the laws being changed if necessary to conform, being 
so worded that your trap will be excluded. You should get in 
touch with these departments in the various states. 
 
                  It will not be long, in my opinion, until 
the farmers will be making money from game, charging for tres- 
pass rights or for game killed, and that will make further 
deand for your trap. I am sure you will find some one who 
will manufacture it and that your invention will do muck1 good. 
I am sending mr. Leopold the -hoto. 
 
                 Very truly yours, 
                 Till" IRTDIANýA FA1hkR v UI 
 
 
                 Assistant Editor 
 
AFAndrews-01 
'guc 1 . 
 
  

					
				
				
				
				
 
I 
 
 
41 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ALVIN F. HAHUS 
 
   ORIOLE, INDIANA 
 
 
JOSEPH M. HIRSCH 
 
  CANNELTON, INDIANA 
 
 
       The enclosed photo of our new Hawk Trap shows an actual catch, made
on 
April 26, 1931. 
 
 
        We know by repeated tests, that this trap is a perfect device, which
meets all 
demands of a trap for a bird of prey. 
 
 
        We believe, that this trap has unusual commercial promise and will
be well 
worth your careful investigation. 
 
 
        A copy of the patent, testimonials and names of many, who know the
effective 
work and the needs of this trap will be sent you on request. 
 
 
        We would like to hear from you by return mail. 
 
 
        Address all communications to Hirsch & Hahus, % Cannelton National
Bank, 
Cannelton, Indiana. 
 
 
HIRSCH & HAHUS 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
The Only Weekly Farm Paver Owned. Edited and Published in Indiana 
 
 
Huntington, Indiana 
 
 
                                          JuM 17, 1931. 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
404 University Avenue, 
Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
Dear Mr. Leopold. 
 
     We enclose carbon of our letter to Mr. Hahus, relative to 
his trap invention. We wish also to thank you for your interest 
in the subject. Your suggestions interest us very much and present 
an angle regarding the clumsy hawks that had not occurred to us. 
I believe there would be danger of getting the innocent hawks and 
that I was or might be mistaken in my first judgment. Perhaps 
the Survey will make a test of the thing. This would be very 
Interesting. 
 
      I hope you get down this way some time for a shoot with 
me and some at our archers. You are better than aw one in our 
club here. After bragging to you I went out and fell down to 
less than 300. My ambition is 450---an average of 5 at the 
American. I've advanced to the place where I find myself 
disliking the black and white rings at 50 and 40 yards; so 
there is still hope. 
 
      IIve fourA a "sloppy" stance a good thing---a loosening of

the left shoulder joint when aiming and releasing, instead of 
the hard, set stance I formerly used. If I tighten up I do not 
do so well. I fell into this *sloppiness" accidentally and then 
learnaed that one of my archer friends Acultivates it. I do not use 
a conscious point of aim but have a feeling that I am about right, 
which, most likely, is a sib-conscious point of aim. 
 
                                     S incerly 
 
 
AXAndrewse 
 
 
More than 160.000 copies weekly 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr . Alvin F, Umhza 
 
 
Doea* Mrs B~ami~m 
 
     lRf-,rrig4 to our ete tony~ of tiw, qt)2.p , w a" 
anclosi.Rg herewvith oýxbon ,,-apy of lt t-r ricooAiwxl today 
from Mr. Leopola of lbadi;;an, Witsamiizng thfo aithor of 
 
 
     You v,ill 110tc tby~t ho it fonv~ardliý. tluw lhtof--rrph 
Suld lattier to th" Biological lurvoyl whlioh t.3 ý part of 
tile U-nitc-d states Daep twell-,,t of Ag~~tr.It Ae-mm* tO 
  u that thi. Is a veryl good tir tro do, -13,' thil 
lcettie'r crmau to tif ha rv(oy f romr Mr. Iecqiold, it wýlll 
 
 
     If t    "e ro dcivuloywmntq wn will  tdisyou& Vivo 
of Courseu, lvm; no way of knwo  ~n   h   ioowill 
  bobt fee  tii n, sholtmld aj f% goed uýýe f or :cour t mr-ntton

ivid w',11  vdb vi uao 811 
 
                         Ycry trauX, yuitrs, 
 
AlAi id rwn                   MIH UTDIAjlXA rAn~i TTIT) 
 
 
Director, r-rz'vine 1Dretxu* 
 
 
jimt 1'/ iý36L, 
 
  

					
				
				
 
THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
         STATE OF INDIANA 
     DIVISION OF FISH AND GAME 
          INDIANAPOLIS 
 
 
WALTER SHI 
SUPEINTEN 
FPHEE AM 
 
 
A t. 
 
 
IRTs 
HENT 
 
 
                                          Jime 91, t1-:3 
 
 
 
    r. Aldo Leapold, 
 
    -adiscon, di sconsin. 
    i)e ar  V. LC  old 
 
 
                    v enry son to have de 1aycd return 
   o f'  survey b_-o, which         rleouve e to read last 
   or irnr. re Sauturoday oefo17e leavinl  I took the 
   book t -v)ir offiice but could find no one Ln. "ac 
   and I tried to locate ,ou as we intended to take jou 
   for an airTlane rido. We found tat -ou wee in 
   xew 1exico on a field t01ip). 
 
   aas mvl surpor~se) to find exeoel~ent quil country 
   don ~ here, te aC e iae bi Urds and ver  7lent if . 1 
   ,he)e are also  e rus )nairie ch icre'  we- Iatched 
 11       one    -uC, h7t  had :o r s .efes in re 'ring 
   then. 
 
 
   i3s 1-7 fie]i xit1 seven ti o-ad. ore eT;sO to h tch. 
   This shouid si7 e the state               )f ret " b..' o ir{]s 
   is seso. The     reserve in estiiV s ,clJdes a 
   area of oeary seven !hn(a c acres, a trac t recI nt ( 
   obtair' C ti o ugL ta oalxnde ent lands  It is worthless 
   fro_ an ar~elftral s   ndf Lrt, but excellent sare 
   cover* 
 
   Tavo read Stodonard' b~o which cu  ecooende, at 
   present ! ~sinS tir ±'h it as astudyu. r have 
   also re'd and haeve in ivy vosseocion, yor  e Survey 
   of t]-ie KorI-  Central States. It is a  ie 'ee I 
   woni< .nd denotes mii' labor exponded. 
 
   I 1ish you a hap  and saccessful season. 
 
 
                              TPIlu r --,ours      ...  *   . 
 
  

					
				
				
             "Protect, Improve and Use the Forests of Indiana"

 
 
                                 STATE OF INDIANA 
                         THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
                             DIVISION OF FORESTRY 
                                   INDIANAPOLIS 
RALPH F. WILCOX 
  STATE FORESTER 
CHARLES C. DEAM                 February 24, 1Q31. 
REStARCH MOISTER 
JOSEPH F. KAYLOR 
AISSITANT STATE FORNSTE 
 
 
 
 
     IMr. Aido Leopold 
     404 University Avenue 
     National Bank Bldg. 
     Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
     Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
              I just received word from one of three class mates of 
     mine who have been with Colonel Bunker in Alabama for the last 
     four years,.  it sems that politics have taken an adverse turn 
     and these three men may lose their positions. 
 
              I am particularly interested in Mr. Harry Smith, Box 1458,

     Mobile, Alabama.   He has a fine personality, is over six feet tall

     and weighs in the neighborhood of 200 pounds, and is an all around 
     capable chan -' o has worked his way from the mines in Scranton 
     through night school, high school and finally through college. 
     He has absolutely made good in Alabama.     Unless some e7nployent 
     is available during the summer he plans to take a year of advance 
     training at Cornell or Syracuse.     He writes me that he is parti-

     cularly interested in Fish and Game management, and subjects per- 
     taining to natural history.    T have written him that I feel that 
     probably the best opportunities for a forester today in specialized

     training are along the lines of game management. 
 
              I wonder if you would be kind enough to write Xr. Smith 
     in regard to tat particular field as it looks to you at the present

     time and send me a copy of your letter.    Any assistance to fr. 
     Smith to become oriented and take advantage of the best opportunities

     at thais tie will be greatly appreciated by both of us.     Smith is

     not afraid of any amount of hard work or sacrifice which may be 
     necessary to carry him through. 
 
 
                                       Sincerely yours, 
 
 
 
 
                                       R.    WILCOX 
                                       State Forester. 
    RtiY: 
 
 
PREVENT FOREST GRAZING AND FOREST FIRES-IT PAYS 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
eb. 26, 19 
 
 
,oxl45 
 
 
 
 
rae o are inter,,e in We al1l aloi~r:T  mvnt lIne 
 
    ere is at thi, moet i fel lowh o oen at  ihiii ti 
 
fto row b' in t        in2 of job. I wd uet 
 
 
let teI. 
 
    &fer u hVe cniet      it  fee free to 
  eome!I -akatzithl I!ot:,-trstv~ ~yb on yu iM.l 
i of oore do not bm  yo.bt "r. ilco's   tio  e 
a lIv  with m. 
 
           ofur sire 
 
 
 
 
                        \S X)Lm OL 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
              PURDUE UNIVERSITY 
                        LAFAYETTE, INDIANA 
                    SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 
 
                           February 
                             13th 
                           1 9 3 1. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
 In charge, Gane Survey, 
 Room 404, University Av. Bank Bldg., 
 Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
 Dear Sir: 
 
     I thank you for your kind letter of the tenth. I should 
 be very glad to receive suggestions from you as to contents 
 of a course in fish and game which would be practical prepa- 
 ration for work in this state. 
 
     Mr. Shirts, Head of State Department of Fish and Game,has 
kindly expressed himself as very much in favor of this type of 
instruction at Purdue, so much so that he would be willing to 
use his influence to supply some funds for this purpose. 
 
     I am not decided as to the necessary length of such a 
course, its contents, graduate or under-graduate nature, etc. 
It might be that a man taking the regular Forestry course for 
the first two years, could major in Fish and Game during the 
last two years and then in exceptional cases, graduate work in 
Quail or the like might be given. 
 
     I should be glad to have your suggestions as to some such 
program. Following your suggestions I am going to attenpt to 
interest the State Urganization of the Izaak Walton League in 
this program. 
 
                        Very truly yours 
 
 
                        Burr N. Prentice, 
                        lieadof-Forestry Department. 
 
 
BNP/ALB 
 
  

					
				
				
Copies to Messrs. Otterson 
       Doyle 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          Peb, 19, 13 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   .   On 11, Prent o toe  t 
 lTteleohton ofe a eeruin a't- ~ ef tl1 
 ofe it va to!igto t it.i poi o t gv vo~         - 
 
 
 
 
 
     to gii e a ini   intoro rhts 
     field, I ot   vivr, t thelp y: t , U o I 
 
 
 
 
 
eoursmi are i t plovid r 1 t) e over for 
      I d it manto ~pYr tha I i' tt 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
              PURDUE       UNIVERSITY 
                      LAFAYETTE, INDIANA 
                   SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURI 
 
                      January 19, 1931. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 
 
Dear Leopold: 
 
                        Though I regret to say that we have 
not as yet been able to take up further with you our gradu- 
ate work in qu.l, nevertheless, we are still considering the 
subject of fish and game at this Institution. We hope to 
be able to at least establish some adequte instruction in 
this line and that it may develop into such a position that 
we can take up further with you the desirability of the es- 
tablishment of fellowship. 
 
                        Of course, I realize the fact that 
there may be no fellowships at such a time. 
 
                        I am anxious to find out what the 
Institute in New Jersey is doing along the line of fish and 
game, which I understand is the only institution in the coun- 
try giving a complete instruction in this field. 
 
                        Would you kindly give me their ad- 
dress in order that I may inquire further as to their curric- 
ulum? 
 
                            Very trulf yof 
 
 
                            Burr N. Prentice, 
                            Head of Forestry Dept. 
 
 
BNP: ALB 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                     Roon , 1 
                                     Uiiver3siti Ave. a* BL   . 
                                       Madion, isconsin 
                                     7ebmary 10, 1931 
 
 
 
 
Dr. Týhrr '7. Prentice 
He1ad of Forestry Departaent 
Pnxrdue Universi ty 
Lafayette, Inilaza 
 
 
 
              e~ue        o i 1e Jeree3 is cIle     the 
onservation Institute A may be addrs      at ClInton, l'eT 
Jery. 
 
              Yo a   pssbly a little onf     d about the 
nature of their instetion.   It is "c   ete" in th. field of 
artificial ~rp#tion, 1x~t the omie is vocat!nl rahr than 
profes~ional, nd hady   a2lel to the grdut      i tie  you 
have in mid, 
 
              I[f yo il  interest the State Division of the 
Ieak altn        in ooseaion activities at ?tir~b~e, they 
might be of mah ]aIp in sezring the ne-eia  finan~cia bc- 
 
 
              I am glad to i~ow of you continue interest, and 
hope you will cal on me henaver I ca help irhe   yur 'a 
proga, 
 
                            Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
 
                              In Chrge, Game Survey 
 
  

					
				
				
 
"Protect, Improve and Use the Forests of Indiana" 
 
 
@TATE  If.JflIAhiA 
 
 
THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
     DIVISION OF FORESTRY 
          INDIANAPOLIS 
 
 
RALPH F. WILCOX 
  STATE FORESTER 
CHARLES C. DEAM 
REAMRH FMrEfM                           January 7, 1931 
JOSEPH F. KAYLOR 
ASSISTANT STATE FORMTE" 
 
 
 
     Mr. Aldo Leopold 
     c/o Game Survey 
     Madison, Wisconsin 
 
     Dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
             I was sorry to miss you at the Society of' American For- 
     esters   'eeting in Washington. Col. Lieber asked me to convey his 
     warm regards to you while attending the meeting. However, I heard 
     your very excellent paper read and took down a number of interest- 
     ing notes about it. Col. Lieber is anxious to know if a report 
     of the survey will be off the press in the near future. I explain- 
     ed to him that I believe it is your plan to collect this material 
     and that you are at present editing parts of it in preparation 
     for the final copy. 
 
             Enclosed find several additional photographs of grazing 
     and game cover together with prospective pictures contained in 
     several of our leaflets. Some of these cuts are being used in 
     a publication at the present time but will be available within 
     the next three weeks. In case you wculd like to use any of them 
     please mark the ones you can use and we will mail them to you. 
 
             17hile talking with Mr. Paul Reddington the other day he 
     explained that you had a few copies of American Game Policy bulletin

     available. I am wondering if it would be possible to get five 
     or six copies of this since I have glanced over the material rather

     hurriedly but find it a very constructive collection of thoughts 
     and believe we can be of service in disseminating the infornation 
     contained therein. We will appreciate receiving any copies you 
     may have available. 
 
                                 Sin erely yours, 
 
 
 
     JFK:M                     ;Asst. State " orester. 
 
 
PREVENT FOREST GRAZING AND FOREST FIRES-IT PAYS 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                     JaMar    16,  9)31 
 
 
 
 
 
!r. J.. .       r 
Division of Yorestry 
'W.eortmnt of Oonser7atioi 
Indienapoliu, Iwliazm 
 
Dear 'r. XYlor: 
 
       I x ienlixV you flve ooie    of the Graoe 'olicy. 
 
       m.ý repJort on the %cmro~i~v is noT onl the -,rezn 
11you will 7e par            omet    in   ar  or Ap-ril. 
 
      Svery ic inde            for taie     t   a p'icture 
I will hold tzei for a llttle rii1e If yo1 dont     n    as 
I zua wait ix for cert ain thrs.   It was thoxightfli1 of 
You to suit!l thlese. 
 
      "Iff1V bejst r~ 
 
  

					
				
				
 
WALTER SHIRTS 
SUPERINTENDENT 
FIHRIE1S AND GAME 
 
 
         THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
                  STATE OF INDIANA 
              DIVISION OF FISH AND GAME 
                    INDIANAPOLIS 
 
                                   Nov. 13, 1930 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Aldo Leopold, 
In Charge, Game Survey, 
421 Chemistry Bldg., 
Madison, Wis. 
 
Dear Sir: 
 
                In reply to your letter of 
November 5th, addressed to Colonel Lieber, 
I am sending you under separate cover copies 
of our an ual reports 1923, 1925, 1926, 1929. 
The 1930 report is now being compiled. I am 
also enclosing herewith a copy of our game laws. 
Please note that section 51, page 40, covers the 
question of requiring the hunter to obtain 
the landowner's permission. This act was passed 
in 1905. 
 
                Hoping this information takes 
care of your requirements and assuring you of 
our co-operation, I am, 
 
                Yours truly, 
 
 
 
 
 
                                S. F. Zufall, Asst. Supt., 
                                Fisheries and Game 
 
SFZ/MB 
Encls. 
 
  

					
				
				
flejort on !o Ct 
 
 
i nre~ota 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In 11an& 
 
 
O'i sur 
 
 
Year 
19214 
 
 
I 926- 
 
 
 
1925 
 
 
Arre2ts 
 
 
3 ')70 
1 21C 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
,- / .5'  
 
 
Oonv~t~9n 
 
 
T> e4f 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  93 
 
 
 
 
  9sg 
 
  115 
 
 
Per_3pC 
 
   23 
 
 
 
   7. 3 
 
   7o; 
 
 
           The above info~tien~ r~pret>   th, 'att~t infohmtion whih I

have in my files n is to be pb'1w~Im! in tho chb2ter on a t~t   -~      nw

 
  tr~ti n  myn   eport on the north cets  re!,n Ifyo   h  ~  iareu~tit 
 
info~a t1~p whiahn you yJ pref'er to i~we a    use i w~~   ppecL te yo~ 
 
&"u' tit~'-j It :n re~nin7 to m   the 4cin< ! , e& era co~y
of the Pb>l 
 
                         o yo~ir eoopC'rtion 
 
 
- 
 
 
Ir 1iar  3-ane >rry 
 
  

					
				
				
 
            RMIMM PMUJANTS PLAJ'1'Z IN NORMN CMM.L MIGON 
 (Private plants aor vaderlined. 25% of OM air added to birds rolsaaa 
Sto get total birds ralemed. Toe = plants made bmat UDber Unknown) 
 
 
0 
 
 
 
 
a 
a 
 
I 
p.' 
 
1. 
 
 
       500 
       2000 
       Tog 
Too    Too, 
yes 
 
 
 
Yres    e 
 
 
 
       A 
       4. 
       Sý 
 
 
    6 
    7 
    9 
    9 
 1910 
    1 
    2 
    3 
 
 
 
    6 
    7 
    9 
    9 
 1920- 
   1 
   2 
   3 
 
192r5 
   6 
   7 
 
   9 
1930 
 
 
8080 s4o,)492 
 
 
   a 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 16711 
100110 
 
 
a 
 
 
2396 2Poo 
3800 .2300 
4461 38) 
5222 2650 
603o 31,397 
5500 314M 
2553 sV13 
5293 10,;75 
5941 3Q4OWl 
A6321 29,750 
3350 49~55 
 
 
3000 ISoo 
 
 
2000? 
10,000? 
  Too 
  TYe 
 
 
 
  I 
 
 
 
  S 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  U594 2 
  1500 
  200? 
  2300? 3 
 
 
3000     o000 
t7W05 
 
 
200m? 
 
 
  C 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  OT 
30, 000 
 
 
  9123 52, 00 
  1407 O27,100 
!1q311. 22,850 
12O00 5,000 
 
15000? ? 
 
  

					
				
				
 
   PURDUE UNIVERSITY 
      LAFAYETTE, INDIANA 
    DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 
 
 
 
 
167/ 
 
 
7   64A> 6&Q      /         AJZ 
 
 
/      I                        I 
 
 
Cc) 
 
 
41LZfl/7        -(-- 4-4-, - U 
I'                                                      h-t-i& 63 L6<

 
 
       GA                                                          / 
         4        -   C&A"/%>- -7                           
          6 
 
 
                  A                                                     
7 
                  Z'6"C ,K' c&L-/       4t-z4            7 
 
 
 
                                      / ft 
     ,6z (-&;& p&-  e7   6 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
/Lj/ v(% 7 --c Z 
 
 
"I                                                  / 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SI 
~~<- 
 
 
 
/ e 7 2& 27 ' ,. 2/ ,c2; 
 
 
6' 
 
 
 
 
1~S 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Swot.21I, 1930 
 
 
D)er?,xis-t of liolomr 
i10 Uiversity 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Laf tt, mth  b        OH je, ba .                      
"Dýs-r *All1: 
 
 
eth     o       ho to  rt      T I v-r to Ite t. 
 
Si, ll,      St    St., Pe       r v l       tht 
thy' arri-4y, to u               inis hep r, owvr, very amill and 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
liit   Hi prie is $.2                t     ls o 
          ,,or                      101. os sc ~ hs for n 1t1r"bws 
use those -rat Mt by 'It .          Rle >t1 Stae  r 
 
etl    erli of b-ii- bnore                       "ob  that ere 
is lertnty ofa      t  t rny      of    detired. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          Ar~e yo t l minbes t ts  hetnd inte  oonfsm. e~ 
vation mm-imt? IT soLc, y  mtwattogt       jcailo   wt f 
obnlboAewr, 79 MiStIfyte        I nvery a~jiou to imtuae 
Pturdue to   active in g, eercr andYJ -r. ýVbelbo-.r hais done 
origimial theA- Valori that 1ine. 
 
          T stind ea1 to hevlp i-   thzi thea    i  o.L a b- 
gimn! -"ioah tba Universit4y mey propo)e.,"),)  at111e At of ilia

resnh p3rojeots in the U0nitedf State2 ii be &auil     ory    to 
oermiad~e the University axthorities -hi-, ic th Ce vind in blw. 
2i~sir Wtmve, shoi,__Ld of courne be on maLM, since that is the 
ncs3t vo1~bt1,.l InldiwTa recies. If they rold afkc for -an ap~prolpriation

    fora lfehisoryabdy of qail1simia1-r tro tha-t  t- strte  by Wia 
consin., T -_1 amr te uoot Te L'uld    hnadta       h Rilolwioa& 
Survq ey z offepr nadviLsory  oxrvicesingeti  thiikts stirted.- If 
this interests yqou I can sen. ouam al    of ldditional 'mi~tion, 
 
          Please give rr 'best rpgaTs to 3et15ty. 'Ie look~c form. rd~ to

wsneiW youi next- mmer. 
 
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
  

					
				
				
				
				
 
   Av 
 
 2 /93 
 
       &1d 
 
 
                              deAd 
               cA.                 tJ 
 
 
 U4ft& &LL                        ___ 
      rA t&d 14j 
                       
 
 
                                     
           4t / 
 
 
                                 
                                      
                    fr tL 
 
 
 
      d             
 
 
I      
    AvA C44J A  
 
VI 
 
 
c4           £ 4,4  
 
  

					
				
				
 
At 
 
 
1W 
 
 
9 Lt'4 
 
 
A 
 
 
t 
 
  

					
				
				
 
KENTUCKY 
   Joltl -ovum as 
   0      0 
 
        Aw4v,. i6w/ 
*f/SA..cf rv#c 
 
 
Z927 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I LEGEND 
 
 
Sample Populations perTwp. 
) Foxes (solid =real data) 
         (dash =edtimate) 
 M Bobcats 
 
 
<& Feral Housecats 
 
 
Wolves 
Few or no foxes present 
 
 
*    Present Crow Roost (known age to left) 
*     Former Crow Roost (date last used to right) 
SPresent range of Gray Fox(in so far as 
            determined during survey) 
10:5 Present Red: Gray Fox Ratio(estimated) 
®     Red Fox  date first seen left; last seen right, 
   ©Gray Fox) 
 <§   Feral Housecats seen with dens and young 
       in the wild away from buildings. 
 8> Ferol Housecats seen wintering in the wild. 
 &    Feral HounecAts donot winter in thd wild. 
 
 
S.... AOA 
 
 
v 
 
  

					
				
				
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
D~eay "%r. 'bih 
          xI -'o n7- to her VI. t 7/r(mc1~tf~1 
 
          Thell ytn-ot to the 17awrrs farm tide: fal I jvX4.j 
 
     pp~~ty~r iu    -A ~t If 7yot ý--Lnt o1,1 y lilt is onl the 
 
place this: 7,P- but, -haýt onU 1ioat        Asoh 
the br--ih boirn     re-,, to~ c r sitýa-     g 
 
         I .rill. rmimn ymt later of this nmattor, 
 
 
                  Yaursl for ~   i1y 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Oat. 2, 3.930 
 
 
'Dear "r. T~ih: 
 
         You - te ue soe tle o  t on -coI)nt of siss 
last fal! yu hd not bee abe to obse~e the effect of reeal 
 
of brua-h o qnual on the   Is fag. A3     dertud it, tis 
 
xs ibm erly good q al 1U  , bt te brdahi    al l out out 
 
  c~uri~ the winter of 12-9 
 
         I wol b    interete  to find ot te     of 
 
ovise w  i were on this fal   befoe a-d after the braSh  s re- 
 
oed aleso et    her the b  . been alowd to sprout bk at 
 
tie -resent t.Iime or  heerIt rc-inls inadebase   condition 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
               THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
                       STATE OF INDIANA 
                     RICHARD LIEBER. DIRECTOR OF COmNMRVATION# 
                           INDIANAPOLIS 
 
                       August 16, 19,30.                    A" 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
Game Survey, 
421 Chemistry Bldg., 
Madison, -i sconsin. 
 
My dear Mr. Leopold: 
 
            Replying to your inquiry of July 29th please be 
advised that our state has never, so far as our records, or 
personal knowledge go, imported any southern or Lexican 
quail. 
 
            Some years ago at the request of the -ew Albany, 
Indiana sportsmen we tried to make a deal with a southern 
importer who, however, was unable to fill the order. 
 
            i',ith best personal regards, I am 
 
                                  Very truly yours, 
 
 
 
 
                                  Richard Lieber, Director, 
                                  Department of Conservation. 
 
 
RL:BP 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
Public Estate in Ch 
    The Departmen 
       Consetrvatiot 
 
 
       Summer 193( 
 
 I.Mcormnick's Creek 
2 Turkey Run State Pa 
3.Musat~atauck St ire Pa 
 .Cliff y Fall, State Par 
5.Indiana Dunes State 
8.Pokagon State Park, 
7.Clark County State]t 
8. Kankakee (.ame. Pr, 
9. Brown County Gain 
0, Bass Lake Fish Haste 
1. Lake Wawasee Fish 
2L Trl Lakes Fish Hatti 
3. Riverside Fish Hate] 
4. Avoca Fish Hatcher 
5, Deam Oak. 
6. Tippec~anoe Battlefie 
7, Corydon State Hout 
8. James F. D. Lanier I% 
9. Nancy Hanks Lince 
    Ground. 
,0. Shakamak State Parl 
1. Spring Mill State Pa 
L. Pigeon Roost Monu 
3. Indian Mounds Parl 
4. Morgan-Monroe Sta 
5. Jasper.Pulaski Gaim 
 
 
1 
2 
3 
 
 
4 
 
 
 
 
I 
L 
 
 
1] 
 
 
1 
1' 
p 
 
 
V 
ii 
V 
 
2i 
2 
 
 
 
2. 
2 
 
 
Starge of3                                                   I          
     6 
it of 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
              t  L 
ark.                   A@ 
ak.           I                                    .0 n  ,! 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
i rk. 
Hatchery'.    i        8v       ..          
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Memorlal.             2= ~ i.. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
mlent. 
 
 
lt Foest,.- 
 
 
 
 
 
 
            Presrve 
 
  

					
				
				
File 
         Copies tot Major W~lUv 
                  Mr. Olin 
                  Mr. TOatter 
 
 
 
 
                       Van& 17.,1930 
 
 
 
 
Colonel llhr Liber 
Mieitor of CotkSW4i~n 
 
hn~at oaoinx Wibnn 
 
 
 
 
   *utwtsthrs er t  ood t mw =hsole 6Rtroblef ttneAto a ts11 
 
 
ship for the out~ of R=ar1a ymArtidg     in Ww bey thnt some of 
tge. pmbles mitt in tim be unage and inmwr.d           Thie fellov 
*lip ts hedm~     at the Valver*ty offtch     n mad te  wokis 
being o   by Mr. R. P3. Teatteo, *bo work  wvie the dietionof 
 
 
My, Wickl4m, dim~t~of esot  th  to rutting onea fild Mrtty of 
t" w"&rn the g..tW     w   er to vtui the distrilbtio Pad eM
 a. 
tive alli6s of the bift In that stat*. and Is *o&i- In coase 
oaseeot4 tlo withi Mr. Teattew, so the) the pln of one  ng~nrai 
m~t .and4 dotaU with the p~m of t00 othee., 
 
           At a reasnt wutin Mr. Vic.cUtf wj&.#tsd tht it migt 
be a fin* th1W if ndm   us4t III fiool. e.,14 al" mdo$ta  wor alou 
paraeo  linos. I an vey ethuiastic abst this general treM     *1hi 
   our : fotlowsbp Just a sort of sw14ic Umu fot the Indspead* 
initiative of the 4.tnt ra~vthe  u  an twolattO  0ff  at unrvelin 
 
            The pr    of this letterto lto as whther India-a 
might csewiv  tWrting a m5.ote project 3n Its om  Rw~calan, #Msa 
If so, Aother It ~woul b) willin  t* or In on *   til: with Mr. 
Y,.ttev -'i the negbov$%W stts      I" so, Mr. Isaitter wm4 be ~ia4:

to *al on ym to diwu   the matter. 
 
            I think 0w% Ur. Ko~1o c*7t1!gt    yta an opinolon as to 
the wortiilnsos of this kind of work time he a't )o    time lowetl. 
gated Its Posfibilities. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
a 
 
 
           It S~t tO   thAt       OM4f, Hi. VIAb , and ?11ainoL 
hav a Co0B problem In uatmas in mih the    mw ns ý   h 
vaw1lm 1&0 states Ifw a comon prb1f iAU       Ifcen Ziterst 
As yo of C~ne  nw, th pt11ipl of coriae aflft  i s 00ti 
veywel  In 1* wt14n with the f1shorie prob~es. gad it o~htto 
work sqa1lywo Iu in coaw~t1 wlt'h way ofm   rbe* 
 
           I a- Vdrasty .uittl% 1any iatia of technic.u ob 'oet 
   t~a r wasand mtains ta *Imply l     ~La this  qInquv to you 
a~ttitud towtd the prpo      Mr. TerAter ca sawo   w   q~wutks, 
about th* tehnical *ae  hol ..1"   mwatii be fwrnmblo. 
 
          WTM kindest reggrs -eM best wiahe% 
 
                            TYAr sincerely 
 
 
                            1w. ChErg., 
 
  

					
				
				
 
TH E DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATRON 
 
 
STATE OF INDIANA 
RICHARD L IANAR, DIRECTOR OF CONIS RVATION 
      INDIANAPOLIS 
 
 
                      Maroh 21st 1930. 
 
 
 
Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
   Gae$urvey, 
421 Chemistry Bldr,., 
 
 
mdison, Wisconsin, 
 
 
Dear Lr. LIeopod:- 
 
 
         Replying to your's of March 17th, please be advised 
that Mr. Yeatter called on Superintendent Shirts some time 
ago and received the offer of all possible assista.ce from 
this Department, includin  the service of gae wardens. 
 
         In as much as Ohio and Illinois seem to be interested 
and in the hope that ultimately so0thing can be done, we are 
glad to join, althouh for the time being a srvey in this 
state would not show very much. 
 
         Since your last visit here we have employed eexpert 
pheasant breeder, but in view of previous unscecessful attempts 
have not gven the matter of Hungarians any thought, 
 
         You perhaps have learned that in  anuary we lost Mr. 
Mannfeld; after a few days illness he died fro   double pneu- 
monia. His place has now been taken by Mr. r ialter Sirts. 
         With best personal regards, I a 
 
 
                               Very traly yours, 
 
 
 
                               Richard Lieber, Director, 
                               The Dept. of Conservation, 
 
 
RJLLFG 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. 
 
4. 
 
 
 
 
i6. 
12. 
 
 
13, 
14. 
15. 
 
Ilk 
1;, 
 
Ifs 
 
 
ulibt.  Estate  in  Char~e  of ' 
    The Depart~ment of                                                  
               L 
 
 
 
 
 X edor hk 'se(k 3.;rektx Park                                         .j
-,f 
 Turk ey Rim Stat e P ark                      t                   : 
   "\l~a  tuc ae a 
C'dty [ah 't~uek  Pmf; Pak 
 
Irdjbma J)unes Stat~e Park                  
 
 
IKa nkak~e Game P'reserveY[                                             
                                 
 
St~aa L ake ish liak h er~y                          _,_-......         
                  ( 
Lake Wawse Pihal B thci y                                               
                          !    i 
 
 
Av~ctsd Fish  llatchury...... 
 
 
Iippe~an oe BattIefie~ dy             ... 
C rydon. btat Un le"!                                              
              . 
Ja mae s F1 1) L~ iir Mln i         Fit                                 
               F 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       C o 
 
  

					
				
				
 
                            DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 
                               INDIANA UNIVERSITY                 V 
 
    FRANK C. MATHERS 
rmormsmom O INOGASNIC CHEMISTRY                         BLOOMINGTON, IND.

 
 
                                                              Dec. 27,1 29

 
 
 
 
 
       O s" ii:- 
 
                 I ~i +mnloýing the quail tallv "or t'is v''.
A freilnd 
 
     ,ing out ,Tith me ei~ch day mnd I never, 'nY3' juit how ,n'ry ea3h of
us 
 
     k1illed. flovev,3r I le2o-)Tl1l t,-l4liefI rl  the og hence the sex

 
     ration is co.r3ct.   I note on my crd a girvaal incaf;a3ein cocks 
 
     to.- --Ii the last of thie -,son. 
 
                    There were 'ior, co-lefe this veer then lfIst. I tni
k 
 
            tis) ,ch l     J - in-- due, to bcvi 7;ther. There wA,%tvery

 
     rnPPV P'ys of 3ev*-.re rIin And Ft other tiesthe cold              e.

 
     I also hA4 much les3s tine .vTirhble for 'uitin- this yRr than in 
 
     prst y<,irs.   Theae is unlimitndt food (rag weeds) unless- tihe
cold. 
 
     veftber co nbi ed with qlet or ice m-kes the food unvw-ilRble.  A 
 
     che< of food. contenti   showed thot in the (nrly rqWrt of thi s-ison

 
     the rsg weed ,vas almJost the eole fool.. Llt ý', corn vms the
',in 
 
     food. Thej  reqj3on for tim c    e to corn is that corn wvcs not 
 
     availsbl-:i on thnj     until nfter buskinp   was pnrtlv comrwD1ted.

 
     T'ue v,-- fewer' rqbit:3 lth,'vn in other"                 3-1
that 
     ,ne bunch of rinip necks   hsf b er  .n sev r~1 ties. 
 
 
y 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
                             DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 
                                 INDIANA UNIVERSITY 
     rRANK C. MATHE:RS 
PROrSaSOR Or INORGANIC CHEMISTRY                          BLOOMINGTON, IND.

 
                                                              Oct. 31,1929

      Oct. 11,1929 
 
      Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
 
      Madison, Wis. 
 
      My dear Mr. beopAid:- 
 
                            I shall be Very Il d to keep the quail record

 
     this year. I had intenIdead to keep it anyway. I tAought of using 
 
     a Pedometer and recording the sovies and bag per mile. 
 
                            I read the bulleting you send last May. It was

 
     very very interesting. 
 
                           I wish to may that I have airady seen three 
 
     covies on my fani this month. I did not see that many last year 
 
     under about the same   conditions of walking eto. However these 
 
     qua!ils were ve-jy ssII in size. 
 
                        I shall report any additional obsurvations that 
 
     may be of value to you. 
 
                              Yours truly, 
 
 
                                            F.)C.M thers. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
              UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
                       BUREAU OF BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 
                                WASHINGTON, D. C. 
ADDRESS REPLY TO 
 
 
CHIEF. BUREAU OF BIOLOGICAL SURVEY 
       AND REFER TO 
          x                                             August 12, 1929.

 
 
 
 
 
 
            Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
                    In Charge, Game Survey, 
                           Madison, Wisconsin. 
 
            Dear W. Leopold: 
 
                   Thank you very much for sending the copy of the interest-

 
             ing and stimulating report on your Game Survey of Indiana. It

 
             will be circulated to interested people in the Biological Survey

 
             and will be available to Mr. Buckingham whenever he wants to
see 
 
             it. We surely appreciate having the material contained in your

 
             series of State reports available In the Biological Survey,
and 
 
             I wish you continued success in making them. 
 
                   With best wishes, 
 
                                              Sincerely yours, 
 
 
 
 
                                                   W. C. Henderson 
                                                   Acting Chief. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                      1-ujut    1929 
 
 
 
 
 
Col. Richrd  ieer, Di    or 
State Conseration Deat 
Inl!anapol in Indian 
 
Dar Colonel Liher: 
 
         I ws very mah kte.rted In your letter of 
July 30 ana the memorania 1ý Moesr. Wallace, WI-Los, 
and Mannfld.  These rr the :mst usfifl criticism    that 
I have so far reeved and I wish to tahcyou very much 
for tk    the pins to let m  ae them.  I ha'vý  de 
corrot ion. in iy file copy with renrt to almost very 
o int raize- 
 
 
         I wish you. would thank the various member 
of your departmnt for the help they htve £iven nO, 
returning the mem-or-nu& herwxith. 
 
 
Wi.th ndst raeg  s, 
 
 
               yours sIncerely, 
 
 
 
 
 
                     In Oh-rge, Game Suxvey. 
 
 
Im 
 
 
Inc. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
                    THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
                             STATE OF INDIANA 
                             RICHARD LIER, DIRECTOR OFC CONSERVATION 
                                 INDIANAPOLIS 
                                 July 3, 1929 
 
 
 
 
 
 
        Zr.  4dO LeopOld, 
        421 Chemistry 3uilu)i,, 
        a ison2, DZisconsin 
        Doear rr. Leopol.L: 
                         I urn retj7ning, reluctantly, -our ten1ative 
        report ana hope  ' see it in print real soon.   eessrs.     LLanU
iesu, 
        Wiallace and. Wilcox have reao. it with the ~sme interest that 
        I uia,  In orCer to let you nave airect inlormation, I wm 
        enclosing three miaeoranada by the aoove mentioned Division heaas.

        You will notice that the ;.trJters lully appreciate the 
        extraord~inary avotunt 01 labor perl'oraea by you an, therelore,

        I  cow that you will take their criticizi :or what it is, 
        nux ely, an expression 01 mrienaly interest even waere they 
        ais agree. 
                        For mnyself, I want to tarAC yoa brt your 
        reb erences to the Departi'ent. .s you~rs is a Gu~e Su~rvey ob 
        In~aiana, you. coula not very well enlarge upon the importance 
        which the builaing up ob a public estate in ind~iana bears to 
        adauitional protection ol wila lite. T2en years ago, we had. only

        18UU acres, toay, appro:iivtely ASO01 public lase are in 
        charge 01 the iDe artmaent. 3y the ena o1 the nextv &iscal year,

        we Iope to more tan aoaole this~ amiount. In that respect, i 
        oelieve Inajana hs aaopted. an ad~vance-prograL. in Conservation

        "vor1[ Jecaase its par(s aim lorests will iiiieaiately )euomle
01 
        interest to t ie g~e protector. 
                        The statement imane on page 13 by inr. ~rank Gentry

       and reberrea to in 1. in. hanubela's i:erorand,v, in rny opinion,
is 
            01autu   au.   Pong.i. Gentry as i oo, I shouloi osi oate 
& -   to includ~e one statemenL. s 'iion ~' oter t jigs  0e is one ol
tue 
u en who tries to obstruot the oolicy         ore    rnnti       h 
               1+.J                  _L, 7++         J_ .      n  r s e 
 
 
 
 
        liow~n County Gsx~e Preserve since ne is  p:n eluly uore itrse 
        in tume  preservation  ol+ the  red.  iox  eto   ++++or+tis ++ parposes
 .t+an  bir ds. 
 
                        On page uL3, y~ou. ive t: is gear' baagct and 
       revenues, In the birst place I corn ecteQ th~e )irioa oi the aunes

           Park ley whic i..oin eight years insteaa o: ten. Tu~e Clarke-

        c+ary co-operation   moun.ts to ($2000 nursery ana ,$1?00 lire. 
fine 
        0,. Department apQnpropiation linol General Treasury aria incoime

        shoula. read. 19,477. hot incluicea in th is m~ouno are tue specific

        api: rspriations lino o.~r historic monument x ith i l:e excep zion
01 the 
        Lanier house an. grounuas. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Public Vtate in C ui' 
    TheDpnei-t I 
                 a 
 
 
          lint 127 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          1          1 
 
 
 
 
 
      I, 
 
 
 
    I              I 
 
 
 
  l I     U   i I. 
 
  !     I.        I 
 
      kI hI 
 
             I J v 
 
      1 1 III 
 
      x [ 
 
 I      I Ii 
 
 a         II I1 
 
      t 
 
      I L       a 
(I U 
 
 
            *TYPL (V  
7 , rIMNI 
  1 I 
 
         IT C1I , 
 
 
) 
 
 
2S 
 
 
I1 
 
 
J 
 
N 
 
 
! 
 
 
YP{L$ F CD, 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14r. "luo Leopolu. - page 2. 
 
 
                Ihenever yJou have : inisheQ. with the iiieoran~a 
 ol the Division C!ieis, .indj retari t±e same to oar files. 
 
                In conclusion I zaut to tha'7 0ou lor your very 
 fina personal reference. 
 
 
                              Very truly yours, 
 
 
 
                              Richar- Lieber, Director, 
R-L-ei The D                          rttment of Conservation 
 
 
?.J. One of the harcdest inin-s to camply -vith is, as you know, 
the other   11a' s uestioniaire. It is a sort of Procrustes beu. 
The State   ives as rathor s all - o1nts to conauct our Parks 
ane. it is leit to oar ingenuity or call it olownright 1brass" 
to find. lioeral frienis arm. contribators. Not incluo.e  in the 
above receipts, 1or esipie, are two presents receivec. ior the 
col   eration 0    1.UJl    e *ach  the first beini an o0i lill bailaing

aa. hal   section ol lad i L_-awrence County (opting fill .tate 
Park) Irofa General Garry C. Trexler or _llento11n,  Iennsylvania, 
Chairim   0 oL the ioarc oi the Lehiiih Portln Cereent Conpny, valued. 
at approxinately .,4,000.   The other is a oOO ioot strip oi lanc- 
6/10 o0- a mile long, entrance to the Incdiana Dunes State Park, 
reoeiveu. Irom Samuel Insull Jr. a    .: nis utilities, which is 
valuea at approximately u60,000. 
 
     I also   i-entionecL our incie we have estimatea. ior this year 
to oe el,120whicn, plus a balwlce o0      ,347.30 carrieu over 
iroi list year, gives us a total o-- 410±,7.o0.    Thus, W ile th)e

State has been sonmewhat pen~urious i. .ia~in neeaed, at least 
highly mesiraule, appropriations, it eas been very liberal in 
leaving us to our own Uevices ana, no grabbinl off, as so 
Irequently is mone, the proceec~s. 
 
     T have ammed. these iiiures mierely to eive you a better 
insibgt into the workings oL our Division ol L    s ari Taters. 
 
 
_.ain with best regards, I am 
                              RL. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 
 
 
    STATE OF INDIANA 
DIVISION OF FISH AND GAME 
     INDIANAPOLIS 
 
 
GEORGE N. MANNFEL 
  SUPERINTENDENT 
  FISHERIES AND GAME 
 
 
                                        .June I1, 1929 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 _r. ýldo Leopold, 
 Caone Survey, Sporting irms and . unition 
 lanufacturers institute, 
 .7 dison, Wisconsin 
 
 Dear Lr. Leopold: 
 
                I took up the netter with Yr. Oliver 
Neal regarding the pheasants on the Brown County 
State Game Reservation, and he positively states 
that he has seen broods of young ring-necks with 
their hen mother on the ridges in the 1Reservation. 
 
                Personally, I could not verify Kr. 
heal's contention, as  do not visit the eserva- 
tion very often. If I can aet any further inforna- 
tion regarding pheasants in i-rown county, will be 
rlad to forward same. 
 
 
Yours truly, 
 
 
George N. 
su-t. v'isheries an' G ne 
 
 
GI /I J3 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
June 21 1~99 
 
 
            Mr. GO.. N, annf1 
            Dprtnt of Conseration 
            Di~isila of Vsh and Giam 
            IndAmpol ie, Indiana 
 
            Dear Mr. Mannf*1* 
                Thank yo for your letter of Jun. 18, ver - 
            fYing the breeding of ringnec   In Brom  Courity. 
                Sine witig yeiv              a reort 
            from your Geo1og Departmn,  a    te ng glacial 
            bounar so that the ctr of Brown County si 
            cluded. Accordingly Mr. Neal Is obseratioans do not 
            depart from wt appears to be the adherenc    tf 
            -peasants to glaciated territoz, 
 
                I hop Mr. Neal udrstan      that I was not 
           questionin his obsatioans     but simply wnte 
           to be sur that I had understood him correctly, sin 
           my interview with him was I      hurred oe. 
               My Indiana reporwill ro h you within two 
           weeks. 
 
                With best wtish, 
 
                                 Tour* sincerely. 
 
 
                                 In Charge, Game Suvy. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
        AKa 
 
 
 
F' 
 
  

					
				
				
 
/ 4> 
 
 
) 
 
 
'ly £;, 
 
 
7/VH 
 
 
tI AAAAJO 
 
 
    V. 
 
 
 
p. 
 
 
2/ 
 
 
I 
 
 
\ 
 
 
Ct 
 
 
 
 
1Q 
 
 
y 
 
 
I 
 
 
ý 3 
J 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A 
 
 
d o , 
 
 
I 
 
  

				
      
      
				
				
				
				
 
A. f 
 
 
I,/ 
 
 
A Tale of The VA 
 
 
            Kankakee River 
 
Interesting Early History of the Kankakee River 
        Area As It Was Sixty-five Years Ago 
 
 
It 
 
I, 
C 
 
p 
fj 
0 
 
 
if 
9 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
P 
 
it 
a 
14 
f, 
ts 
r 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6 
de 
I 
 
ci 
k 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
in 
 
 
 
 
p 
a' 
fs 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ti 
c 
in 
IN 
a 
in 
t] 
a 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
"0 
 
 
q 
iN 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
b 
ro 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
It 
 
d 
 
 
 
 
0 
k 
 
 
1 -11 A ,                 A - 
 
 
THE//AKE 
 
 
 
                        H  4Published Continuously 
 
 
UNTY 
 
 
For Over Fifty-Three Years in Crown Point by the Same Ownership 
 
 
CROWN POINT, INDIANA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1934 
 
 
STAR 
 
 
w. ewe - 
 
 
FRED Y. WHEELER, EDITOR AND PUBLISHER 
 
 
   (EDITOR'S NOTE). Inasmuch as exactly where, probably the land- 
 the government has  plans underlord might inform   me. 
 way to restore parts of the Kanka- 
 kee river area to its original state  On returning to the hotel and 
 for a national game preserve, the       bre 
 following true narrative of that fa- getting  akfast, the  landlord 
 mous river and marsh published at told me he thought my best plan 
 this time appears to be opportune, would be to go down to Harmon 
 The story was written by E. W. Grangnrs. He said Mr. Granger 
 Irwin, who at the time of writin' 
 was totally blind, having dictate! was an old duck shooter and 
 it for publication. Mr. Irwin will be trapper, who lived on the edge 
 remiembered by many of the older of the marsh southwest of town. 
 inhabitants, especially in the vicin- 
 ity of Hebron, Where he spent much He said "fE you take the road it

 time on the once famous, but now will be flve miles; if you go 
 almost forgotten river and marsh.) straight across, down thrqugh the 
                                 woods, it will be about three. I 
  On the 18th day of October, will go out and show you where 
  1869, during a  blinding snow- to start. Mr. Granger may be out 
storm, I drove 10 miles to West- on the river now but he is home 
field, N. Y,, a station on the Lake frequently and I think while wait- 
Shore & Michigan Southern rail- ing for him   you can find fine 
road, and   bought a   ticket to shooting right near his house". 
Chicago, I was going duck shoot- So putting my gun barrel through 
lg. I did not know    the exact the straps  of   my   valise and 
scaa  of   my   depredations but throwing it over my shoulder, I 
Would determine  that upon in- was off in spite of the heavy load 
qtiry after reaching Chicago.   on my back. I was walking on 
  A friend of mine had told me air. 
he had a brother-in-law, F. J.    After  leaving  the  hotel,  I 
Abbey, who kept a gun      store passed through heavy timber for 
on South Clark street, and who, a mile and a half, passing many 
he was sure, could give me some ponds all of them  full of ducks 
valuable advice in my search for and I shot as many as I could 
ag Id shooting location. On my carry. 
arriMal at Chicago, I made my     When I reached the highway 
way at once to Mr. Abbey's store a man came alonlF with a load 
d found him a very genial and of lumber and carried me and my 
pe    t gentleman. I gave him plunder to Mr. Granger's house. 
my muzzle-loading gun to be re- Arriving there just before noon, 
bor   and  furnished  with new Mrs. Granger said she was ex- 
tubes for percussion caps. After pecting her husband every min- 
he had given   the  gun to his ute---"hang  your ducks on   the 
vorkiaen to make the above re- clothes line and come right in, 
Sirs, I askod him if he could dinner will be ready". Mr. Gran- 
iret me to the best place he ger came to a late dinner. He 
know of for duck shooting. He said he was anxious to get back 
said:  "I think we had   better to camp that night and would 
ake a walk over to South Water take me with him. When ready 
street, the great game market, to start we walked four miles 
and see what we can leanr there." east to the Hebron canal, enter- 
  Upon arriving there,  I saw, ed Mr. Granger's boat and start- 
                                ed for the river a short distance 
what to       was a wonderful 
s  t. C.c°                  f         bsg    'to, see ducks the 
      If milte-fl                           n   sý the river. 
    ngoi In     in    t                    toA *zrarz4 in sight 
        th           go;    ys in the edgeof the timber and 
vat   e  stalt    arriving wit open water ducks in the channel. 
'resh ft lts and hauling away We also started several deer that 
hat already sold. Buyers from ran back splashing through the 
otels and restaurants were pres- water. We did no shooting as 
ent getting their day's supplies- Mr. Granger said we would have 
t was a scene of great activity, no time to stop  and pick up 
Carcasses of deer were hanging game that evening. We reached 
rom the awnings; also wild tir- a high island called Indian Gar- 
keys, geese, brant,  ducks and den where Beaubein & Sargent's 
rairie chickens. This was going camp was located. We met them 
an, on both sides of the street as just coming in with their boats 
ar as the eye could see.   We loaded to the water with ducks c 
tepped into the commission house and geese. After supper the mar- 
f Joyce & Cunningham. As soon ket shooters suggested that we 
s we could get the attention of help them   Cut  a  boat  road 
lhe manager, I told him I was through the timber next morn. 
ooking for a place for good duck ing to a marsh   back   three: 
hd goose shooting and asked him fourths of a  mile where they r 
  he could advise me where to could hear geese but were unable 
Sto find it. He said "I surely to get to them On account of the 
an. You go to Hebron on the timber and brush in the way. 
an-handle  railroad  about  50   Next morning   we started on 
iflea from here.  There is the this job which took until 4 p. n. 
reatest duck and goose shoot- When we entered the marsh a 
ng I know  of." He handed me wild scene met our eyes. A north- 
package of his shipping tags-- east gale was blowing, whipping n 
and if you have anything to sell the tree tops which surrounded 
tile there, ship to us and we an open marsh     perhaps three- 
ill guarantee quick and satin- fourths of a mile across. Ducks h 
aetory returns",               and geese were constantly pour- h 
Things began   to look  pretty ing in from all sides. We decided ti 
day to me and    after getting to shoot nothing but geese and 
ack to Mr.   Abbey's   store, I brant. We pushed out into the 
ought a 25 pound sack of No. marsh and      took  our stations. 
shot, ad a 6, 1-4 keg of pow- Beaubein and Sargent each had 
shot, and aly's 6 fegt ofs p- a boat and    going ahead picked F 
er, 1000  Ely's felt wads apid their places some distance apart. 11 
300 Ely's water-proof percussion Mr.Gag~ 
ps. This was just for a starter. or. Granger followed and put me 
p Abbey wsustold m    woud srer. on the first big mush rat house u 
tr. Abbey told me hi would be he came to. He had not proceeded 
lad to ship me anything I might more than 75  yards  from  one 
ant at any time after I got 1o- before a large  flock of brant 
ated. Then after paying for my came pouring over the tree tops      f 
un repairs, he insisted on show- directly over him. He gave them 
ig me the way to the Pan-handle both barrels and I saw seven of 
airload station.               them  fall. That opened the ball 
Here was true western hospi- and a million ducks and geese 
ality for you. My train left at rose in the air and began to cir- 
bout 9 o'clock in the evening cle round the marsh    thirty or 
nd arrived at Hebron about 11 forty  feet high.   A  bunch  of 
m.-" m  anquired of Mr,, Scott, Canada geese came directly over 
is station agent, for a place to me. I shot at the leader and kill- 
pend the night. He pointed to a ed him. I aimed at another when P 
zilding on a knoll a little way I saw the dead one falling di- 
outh of the station. I walked rectly towards my head. 
ad found the place shut up for   By quick work I managed to 
ie  night. I  knocked   several dodge him so I kept from being b 
imes and the landlord at last knocked off the rat house.   He 
ame down with a tallow candle fell so close I reached out and 
  his hand. He showed me to a took him by the wing and pulled 
dom at the head of the stairs. I him up beside me. We were all 
se early next morning. It was using muzzle loading guns, the 
bright   and  beautiful October market shooters each had two 
orning. Upon looking down on double barreled ones, and could 
he station I saw  the platform load them  very rapidly. In an e] 
vered with game. I went down hour's time we had the three boats 
t once to look it over. There loaded with geese and made our 
Vy the carcasses of four deer way back to camp. I do not know 
ad bundles of ducks in large how    many there were but they p 
uantities, also many geese and made the biggest pile of geese I 
rant, Each deer carcass'and bun- ever saw together at one time. 
Ile of game had a card attached That was probably the first time 
'hich proved to be one of Joyce a gun had ever been fired in that 
  Cunningham's tags. Each tag marsh. Next morning Mr. Gran- a 
ead as  follows:  5  deer; 467 ger and I were going back up n 
ucks (large); 392 ducks (small); the river, in his boat which we 
2 geese; 16 brant; from  Beau- intended to load with ducks on 
co & Sargent, Hebron, Indiana. the way.   He was to push the 
Mr. Scott, the agent, was there boat and I to do the shooting. He 
rnd informed me that Beaubein was in the stern with a long pad- c 
  Sargent  were   making ship- dle. I was kneeling on a bunch p 
ient about the same size two of hay about two thirds of the is 
r three times a week. He said way to the bow of the boat. In o 
hey were shooting on the Kan- front of me as a shallow box on h( 
akee river but he did not know    (Continued from  Page7        b 
                                                       f 
 
 
I 
 
 
C 
 
 
SIXTY-SECOND YEAR-NO. 45 
 
  

					
				
				
 
I.We se   to have h  a  nos 
 
  Sidi "You fellows must hay 
  In otether to be er hun" Myhoo 
  tg;p was oii,   ast 
 
        onfif 
      rd Shootigh nest b ots 
 
 
 
 
 Sditch  wih 
 
 aet h¢is oe at plia   I wihe 
 seen          the     B p il t 
 Oand ad a ent mshoa 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    be o1 tee merh on 
      front Mr. Gnn er', oet  i 
 
 IhrtlreA , ll 
 
 
 
 
 Gavs hE ousa 
    rfee  wieatshalo w otight 
 
 
 
 
  be Wadek n       p        an pc fl 
  drt Nurawhng'-I Wtoed - 0o 
  Yut mie.oGayger omtt h 
 
  1:f ahs   whibckh a Te l 
  4ofthe ko e t on the lad 
 
 
 
 
  throw isl Is manffil e 
 
 
 
 
  Warry siade a coul alkU alo g 
  4ga cathe  tn t atdhlear heao 
 
 
 
 
  thel JcSlwiepeping1twitho ut m 
  an hanwe    of i  se es tn. 
 
 
 
 
  Then Tralin artull wn al 
.the frometait Aleasnkl aM 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    thý t *r -t e.Te 
 cth used ON    thak-0 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    dor ton Lic      t 
    r at ni proritae  uni l 
    aad kid Is manyks co  eutd 
 
 
 
 
 inD.-I tad ea two bushel s rat- 
 tcthe 41ack r adlwere ef   votsr- 
 daner onftosd being   tied tam- 
 gThus' cral~ing this  ove  m 
 tiht hulerbandmun de Aga  left4 
 amnn asPoibl.th the ema  nfto 
 gji"ate The 44. Teheall 
   V', widgeo n and teal, k allk 
 'tt  nesto thind :oft duk  fordet 
 
 insk, adia the fiprndoest shoot- 
 
 
ai eva endpua up, to thit 
we" two brothers Uvlb 
that hunted deao i the 
uiut at soon as the to 
writ enough ¶o heat In 
SOWe 10:10Vog an 
erand an =tIfit 
  I taomd the     "ram 
av  not D        n for 
"d Ihatm lo teId atd 
dogr that It called and 
fer Soon boosting Hewas 
di a A 
Andsooe       afad1 
   %sa or  t   d 
 
 
hin at home, I had him 
ame with a $IN 
chain on him andi fas 
tm    finthe ge and f 
ir   few daysrA  later, his 
d oije aw be Othe1 floor 
do        eatI waIl 
and Whistled ftd call 
lid not show nik 
tight it supper time, A 
r by the. nahme uf PON, 
afnie,  whom   I After- 
me to know well, called 
all night. Rearinatje 
themdof     he said ' 
"the river this afternoon 
a ma  going down  "t 
og in hit boat I am sure 
as, My boatman, who 
e can, asked him      e 
the V and he said he 
m,. He said he was go, 
my at Grave Island Camp 
of o*4next day was gqo 
don the river. I said  I 
NA Atlap istand bWefos 
"o If wasw four miles to 
won can Ial by road and 
nibs down      river to 
laind. An so  as I got 
pay I started. out and 
to the  nal.   There, I 
 
 
boat It to e "lst Amd 
Coming out tloughI the 
Oft e y   rivet- I look- 
toi. wayr back. noticed 
6Wt trip With1 lglitherub, 
straight out on eacht 
a, man's SrmS. Then I 
ut into the. strecam  an& 
Iow Wthb the swift ceK 
my former trip With 3h, 
he had shown me     a 
athe South thide of M 
 
 
at bright, Aft.L cold, star- 
 
 
allow ZIft     VWe  stopped and 
kinned the stink and while do-I 
trose I       a ,  te ta re I 
tons". Then they let their dogs a 
Dose. In about a Ifibtetaft 
Vas a dog fight goitio o h   t 
aid "Let's hurry! They'll kill I 
"our dog". While we were talking t 
 
 
[arki4c "teed" ag      tg whis 
Was the only noise we heard. 
   On arrivingt at the spot my 
 was trying to chew down a 
 Small lac     Sih stbAnd bark- 
 Sbetween mouthaul The other 
 t~est dossat back at aye 
 respetful distance licking their 
     leigwounds. One of the men 
 ste    to cut down the tree but 
 my "o Wacif but IMi hftalltith 
Sear it until I told him to stand 
lcwhieh he did, being thir, 
   WhIle one mai   was cutting 
 4dot the twe the other fellow 
 
 
OW a dub. I asked hit What he 
t, V"N       owith that And hte 
said r  would kill then tes"  then 
the to" comte down. I ash, "rav- 
er mind, the bound will attend 
to the coons and if you under- 
take to butt Into. h A You 
are going to get b     bitten". 
rolled out on itsie. lIn te:; 
ttan half a   infte the ho 
 
 
 
comber it was the cirst snow we 
had had that fail. It or~ a foot 
      deepW  ladlyArifed. ere was 
aln OgM hbedgea short distance 
fost      house aid  the snot 
banks on the tee of the betl~ 
seemed revered With prairie OZ. 
ons:        ao 
  Borrowing   white sheet from 
Mn. Granger, I tied it ner and 
a       n and started out Keep- 
iag behind the hedge ad going 
carefiuly I soon hbt    d five 
of there I was--now   y troo re- 
   ladioe. As evwerythingk wits 
   etawa up and dark shooting end- 
   I arrived home just in time to 
have the "h~know, cooked for our 
Christmas Adiater. I foromised to 
  ho ack bait iMprili anid did, 
so late in arati The duoks hai 
all left for ite norh 
  MeI         
	
				
 
     C74¶4 innesota 
 
 
WALTON IAN 
      Devoted to the Conservation of Outdoor Minnesota 
 
 
  March 
 
  1933 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          The Pines, 
          GunFlint 
            Trail 
 
Vol. IV 
No. 6 
 
 
-Copyright, Shemild 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Huntin' or 
 
 
 
Lawlessness 
 
 
 
What's Your 
 
 
Choice? 
 
 
By 
A. E. ANDREWS 
 
 
B EING a rank outsider-especially rank 
     -I'd like to tell Minnesota something, 
     but I won't. What right would I have 
to hint to Minnesota that the Cloquet, White- 
face, Paleface and some other streams on 
the way from Duluth to Eveleth ought to 
be stocked with trout? So I shall forget all 
about the time Art Von and I fished the 
Rain Falls-all about the time he and I 
walked from Freedom down to the old 
track to 51 and 49 of the Beaver River- 
all about the conclusions I might draw 
from fishing with the Gold Island Club up 
on Lake Vermilion-all about the time on 
Elbow Lake-all about-. 
  My subject is "Hain't We Doin' It in 
Indiana ?" I've been cussed and discussed 
so much for this subject that I have almost 
quit mentioning it. And only this year the 
Indiana Farmer's Guide got out signs, in 
waterproof ink on good cloth, which said: 
"Hunting allowed here, only by written 
permission of the owner. This is private 
property and persons who trespass without 
obtaining permission of the owner will be 
prosecuted under the provisions of the 
law." So the idea seems to be going for- 
ward. 
  You get a better idea of what it's all 
about when you consider how     W. W. 
Lucas, former secretary of the Indiana 
Division, I. W. L. A., and I talked once 
when we were out driving. 
  Said Bill: "Good place over there for 
quail." 
  Said I: "I'd like to go hunting in a 
place like that and feel welcome. I'd like 
to buy a ticket at the entrance to the lane 
and drive right up to the house and feel 
I'd paid my way." 
  Said Bill: "Let's get it that way." 
  Then along came Fred Stuck from the 
National Headquarters of the I. W. L. A. 
Fred got the idea and set it down on paper, 
the first time the things Bill and I and 
others had talked of had ever been thought 
out through a typewriter. The idea was 
to set aside a tract and interest the farm- 
ers; to stock the tract, give the game pro- 
tection and feed and let the farmers collect 
for the hunting.    Lancaster township, 
Huntington county, Indiana, was chosen. 
We got no complaint from the farmers, 
but we got kicked in town. Men said they 
did not want to pay to hunt; willing to buy 
guns, ammunition, dogs, knives, match 
boxes, pants, shirts, coats, boots, socks, but 
not willing to pay an admission. Only the 
other day I got a letter from Kalamazoo, 
Michigan, arguing the question with me. 
But the Lancaster project goes gayly for- 
ward. It is a success. 
 
 
0 0 
 
 
Millions of acres of mar- 
ginal lands in Minnesota 
should be restored to their 
original purposes, of grow- 
ing woodlots, protecting 
watersheds, and furnish- 
ing wild life refuges and 
outdoor places....... 
 
 
  The farmers did not get rich from the 
plan. One man got $10 in 1931, which was 
not very much. We asked the farmers not 
to let birds be shot for two years, but 
some of them liked to shoot quail and they 
invited some of their friends out and shot 
them. That was their business, not ours. 
We planted 200 pheasants and obtained a 
few hundred pheasant eggs. These Asiatic 
birds have done well. 
  On the farmer's side of the case you find 
this as soon as a project of this kind is 
started: That the back-fence climber stays 
off-the sneak, the poultry thief, the game 
hog; and the decent man comes. The old 
idea of sticking up a sign saying "No 
Trespassing" did  not work. The law- 
abiding citizen remained aloof, but the 
poacher said to himself: "Here's a place 
where there's game. The sports stay away 
from it; so I'll sneak on and get mine." 
He did sneak on. The farmer thought he 
was a sportsman and he cussed all the 
sportsmen in the world. So the sportsmen 
 
 
and the farmer were at odds and the sneak 
got the grapes-in this case the quail and 
rabbits. 
  Lancaster farmers have found that the 
hunter is not such a bad sort after all, and 
the hunter has found that the farmer is not 
an irritable, irritating, unreasonable, fault- 
finding, peevish, narrow-minded individual, 
as he once imagined. And the law-violator 
does not go on the premises-at least not 
in such great numbers as was once the 
case. 
  So it happened that only a short time 
ago, the Indiana farm publication, for the 
first time in American history, so far as 
we know, came to the assistance of the 
idea and offered to farmers signs with the 
foregoing wording, to be sold at the cost 
of printing plus postage. 
  Would it work in Minnesota? I don't 
live in Minnesota; so how should I know? 
All I know is what has been done here, 
plus a few general notions. And here is 
one general idea that I have garnered along 
the way: That unless sportsmen of the 
Tom, Dick and Harry kind get together 
with the farmers, Mr. Iva Lotta Dough and 
Mr. Bushelbucks will have them all in their 
list. In one state adjoining Indiana there 
was organized last year a shooting club 
that went out wholesale-fashion to lease 
hunting rights from the farmers with an 
idea of keeping You, Me & Co. off the 
land. We pay 25 cents a hunt in Lancaster 
township to shoot rabbits; get our admis- 
sion tickets signed by the farmer and turn 
in the tickets and show our game on the 
way out. That is better than standing in 
the road and hearing Bushelbucks loose 
both barrels into a bevy of birds. Before 
I am cussed any more by men in Salem, 
Massachusetts; Atlanta, Georgia; Alpena, 
         (Continued on Page 15) 
 
 
rnnuuutun 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
The MINNESOTA WALTONIAN 
 
 
Hunting or 
Lawlessness 
        (Continued from Page 2) 
 
Michigan, or Red Wing or Wabasha, I'd 
like for Tom, Dick and Harry to re-read 
this paragraph and think it over. (Bird 
hunting will cost more than two bits when 
Lancaster is ready for it.) 
  I suppose some questioning quizzer will 
want to know what adjacent state it was 
in which the farmers were asked to sign 
up. It might have been Illinois, but as I 
am not supposed to be accurate and de- 
tailed I'll not mention it. 
  I don't like to tell Minnesota anything. 
It seems to me you have so much and that 
you ought to be so thankful to somebody, 
some organization or to the gods of nature ! 
I sometimes wonder if you need anything 
else. But the other fellow's lot always 
seems better than your own. When Art 
Von and I stood on that old right-of-way 
near 49 and looked at some moose tracks, 
I bemoaned the fact that we have so little 
hunting in my own state. He was surprised 
and said to me: 
  "Some of the best hunting I ever had in 
my life was in Indiana. We went rabbit 
hunting." 
  I hadn't thought of that. Here for a 
half dozen years I have even gone out with 
my bow    and put enough arrows into 
enough cottontails to let the double twenty 
rest. But I keep thinking of how much 
fun it would be to aim one of those arrows 
at a duck, goose, shoeshoe rabbit, grouse 
or deer in Minnesota. 
  And again: We have no forests in In- 
diana such as you have. We have had state 
forests for a third of a century, about, but 
the state forester warns us hunters out of 
them. So we have little hunter support for 
state forests and without hunter support we 
get no forests. We now have about 23,000 
acres, which means one standard township. 
And I read in'your Minnesota Waltonian 
that you took over three whole townships 
in one gobble and nobody even batted an 
eye. 
  There is another angle to this subject. 
I will not talk about Minnesota but about 
our own state. We have a county in In- 
diana that has many lakes. But the folk 
in that county never raised a bass and they 
include more poachers than any other 
county in the state. In the county where 
I live there is no lake but there are three 
excellent smallmouth bass streams. We 
have always gone to the lakes to fish until 
1932. At last we have got the idea that 
there is something at home infinitely better. 
Also, we produced 7,100 large-sized small- 
mouth bass for our home waters, some of 
them 9 inches long. In Indiana, the fish- 
ing and hunting always look a little better 
over in the next county. In Indiana, con- 
ditions always look a little better over in 
the next state. I don't know how it is in 
Minnesota; I am talking about Indiana. 
  Here in this county we do not like our 
state forester's policy. So we have raised 
1,500 young walnut trees and will plant 
them. Here in this county many Walton- 
ians make it a rule to step on a half dozen 
walnuts every time they go nutting. Step- 
ping on a walnut is the easiest way to plant 
a walnut tree. I do not say it would be a 
good thing for Minnesota Waltonians to 
carry a few white pine seeds when they go 
into the woods. I do not live in Minne- 
sota; so why should I say? But you can 
get the pine seeds from a private citizen in 
Indiana if you have none yourselves. But 
 
 
don't they grow in pine, cones-or do they? 
You see, I am not an authority on Minne- 
sota. 
T HERE is another little idea I should 
   like to mention. It is this: That the peo- 
ple of the U. S. A. are going to need some 
outdoors. Some fifteen years ago I got the 
idea that, with the coming of machinery, 
there would be an overproduction and hard 
times. The great economists-most of them 
-of the universities talked about the price 
of hogs and came to the appalling conclu- 
sions that if the cost of pork should go up, 
hog prices probably would be higher. I 
could not follow such ponderous logic, and 
stuck to my simpler reasoning that eventu- 
ally man would be emancipated from 
drudgery by the engineers; that it is the 
most absurd absurdity for men to labor 
eight hours a day; that when they quit 
laboring so long, they can be saved from a 
million evils only by an outdoors made by 
the Vast Intelligence. That was fifteen 
years ago. Now a President of the United 
States has come to the conclusion that 
hours should be shortened, and even the 
American Federation of Labor has reached 
a similar conclusion. At last a President 
agrees to an economic' principle that men 
in overalls saw a decade ago. 
  But no one but the IZaak Walton League 
seems to realize that when man has more 
time he will either go hunting and fishing 
or go to the bad. 
  The only way to have an outdoors is to 
take out of competition with the farmer 
the lands that should not be in competition 
with him. Even some college professors 
will now agree to that. As for those who 
do not agree, they mistake bookkeeping for 
economics, and should be on a high stool, 
pen behind ear. 
  This land that is taken out of competition 
may be taken in large lots by the state, 
or it may be taken in smaller lots by the 
farmer-owner. I am not going to discuss 
the merits of either, but personally, I favor 
both. A Doctor of Bookeeping, who failed 
to see the depression coming but who 
assures you he is an economist (there are 
exceptions to this, of course) might write 
a long paper on the subject. Personally, 
I prefer the opinion on the Man in Over- 
alls, either in the shop or on the farm. 
He has been saying for a decade that hard 
times were coming, but his language may 
not have been polished nor even polite. 
  As for me, I say reforest, reduce the 
agricultural acreage for the good of the 
farmer and the good of the rest of us. 
Why? Because in a few years now we 
must either go hunting or go plumb into 
the hands of the keeper of the abode of evil 
spirits. 
 
  KENYON PLANTS PHEASANTS 
  A shipment of pheasants was received 
by the Kenyon Chapter last month from 
the State Department of Conservation 
and planted near the village limits. The 
chapter will feed and protect the birds 
through the winter. 
 
  CARVER COUNTY IKES HEAR 
              KLANCKE 
  Albert C. Klancke, superintendent of 
commercial fishing in the State Depart- 
ment of Conservation, vave the principal 
address at the February meeting of the 
Carver County Chapter held at Waconia. 
 
  Twenty new members were secured by 
the Meadowlands Chapter during Feb- 
ruary. 
 
 
   Join your nearest Chapter now. For fur- 
 ther information write to the Izaak Walton 
 League of America, Minnesota Division, 
 Station, F, Route 1, Minneapolis, Minne- 
 sota. 
CHARLES K. BLANDIN 
  ST. PAUL, MINN. 
 
 
 
          Home of the Mallard 
          Pike Fishing Supreme 
 
 SEWELL'S CAMP 
    In the Heart of the National Forest 
 Recreation - Fishing and Hunting 
   Cottage System-Rates $3.00'Per Day 
            $17.50 Per Week 
         Special Rates [or Children 
       Phone or write for reservations 
       AL. SCHAEFER, Manager 
  Winnibigoshish Dam, Deer River, Minn. 
 
 
WALTONIANS! Boost 
YOUR Magazine! PATRONIZE 
       YOUR Magaine!Our Advertisers 
       Say you saw their advertisement in 
       THE MINNESOTA WALTONIAN. 
When you deal with someone who should advertise in 
YOUR magazine but doesn't, ask, "Why don't you 
advertise in THE MINNESOTA WALTONIAN ?" 
The more ads we get, the better magazine we can give. 
 
 
15 
 
 
PILES 
     CURED 
  Ambulatory Method 
  Practically Painless. 
Office Treatment - No 
Knife. No Chloroform. 
Fistula, Fissure, etc., 
treated successfully by 
office methods which do 
not confine patients to 
the house. Nothing to 
 
 
tear or dread. 
Write for Particulars and Free Booklet or 
          Call Personally. 
   Office Hours: 10 A. M. to 5 P. M. 
 Sundays and Holidays by Appointment. 
 Leland Van Gorden, M.D., Proctologist 
 Suite No. 208 Tribune Annex Bldg. 
   Corner Marquette Ave. and 4th St. 
         Minneapolis, Minn. 
 
 
    The Curtis 
 
        Hotel 
        MINNEAPOLIS 
     Headquarters Hotel 
          for the 
  Minneapolis Chapter 
  lzaak Walton League 
  WEEKLY LUNCHEONS 
        and for the 
Annual State Convention 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Insist on 
 
MONARK 
  Trap Loads 
     and 
     XL 
 22 Cartridges 
   -Quality 
   Counts 
     Most 
 
 
        THIS CRUEL AND EVIL PRACTICE of spring burniags 
        takes place when the birds are either building their homes, 
    0   or at a time when they are nesting. A fire once started Is 
        too often never put out until irreparable damage is done 
-A1     to the fertility of the soil. 
        YOU SHOULD DO YOUR PART and endeavor this year to 
        preserve nesting and feeding areas. Unless this is done the 
 
 
good work of feeding our feathered friends in the winter is 
wasted and their food and natural habitations are destroyed 
by fire in the spring. 
THE GAIN TO THE FARMER In keeping upland birds near 
at hand to fight the insects and grasshoppers which de- 
stroy his crops is of inestimable value. 
 
 
FEDERAL CARTRIDGE CORPORATION 
 
 
MINNEAPOLIS                                                             
                   MINNESOTA 
 
 
MINNEAPOLIS 
 
 
MINNESOTA 
 
  

					
				
				
 
An Individual 
 
 
             Conservation 
 
 
                         Project 
 
 
       An inspiring summary of Mr. Powel Crosley's 
       effective efforts in behalf of our country's 
                           game supply. 
 
 
             By BARKLEY SCHROEDER 
 
 
Mr. Powel Crosley, Jr., Cincinnati industh 
ist, president of the Crosley Radio ( 
    poration, and practical conservationis 
OWN          in south-eastern Indiana, 
       where the historic Muscatatuck 
       River winds its picturesque way 
through gradually rising hills stretching 
away into a soft blue haze towards the 
Ohio, there is now being developed one 
of the most pretentious wild bird propa- 
gation and reforestation projects yet at- 
tempted by private enterprise anywhere 
in the United States. 
  Already this project, scarcely two 
years old, has enriched southern Indi- 
ana's wild life by several thousand birds 
- quail, pheasants, ducks -and it is 
forested by well over a hundred and 
fifty thousand trees--evergreen, walnut, 
tulip, poplar and locust. 
  This important pioneering conserva- 
tion activity which has attracted nation 
wide attention is the work of Powel 
Crosley, Jr., prominent Cincinnati in- 
dustrialist and sportsman, and president 
and founder of the Crosley Radio Cor- 
poration, who for many years has inter- 
ested himself in the cause of conserva- 
tion. The scene of this large-scale ven- 
ture into the realm of Nature is Mr. 
Crosley's beautiful 1500-acre preserve- 
Sleepy Hollow Game Preserve Forest- 
among the hills of Jennings County, 
Indiana, some eighty   miles west of 
Cincinnati and   about seventy   miles 
south of Indianapolis. 
  It has always been Mr. Crosley's con- 
viction that no greater impetus could 
be provided the cause of conservation 
on a national scale than the personal 
activity of individuals interested in wild 
life in actually setting themselves to 
the task of leading the way towards 
a definite country-wide program of wild 
bird propagation and reforestation. 
   Himself never one to "let George do 
it" -   as has been   so  dramatically 
evidenced through his pioneering career 
in the world of radio -Mr. Crosley 
 
 
rit-    suited his actions to his theories 
,or-    and, two years ago, began to 
t.      look about for a location   in 
which he might carry on his own in- 
dependent experiments in conservation. 
This location he found up among the 
rugged hills of Jennings County. 
 
THE land Mr. Crosley acquired was 
    for the most part made up of aban- 
 doned farm land and hills, much of 
 which was still heavily covered with 
 forest. Since the soil in this section was 
 of a type poorly fitted for cultivation, 
 a large portion of the cleared land had 
 been used as pasture for years and, as 
 the result, one of his first major prob- 
 lems was that of providing suitable 
 cover for the wild birds he expected 
 to produce. 
   All grazing was immediately discon- 
 tinued and, with the exception of suf- 
 ficient acreage necessary for the raising 
 of corn, oats and hay needed as feed for 
 his stable of riding horses, Mr. Crosley 
 permitted the entire holdings to "grow 
 wild". As the terrain of this section 
 was admirably fitted to become a haven 
 
 
for quail and was too rugged and hilly 
to be especially attractive to pheasants, 
which prefer low marshy land, Mr. 
Crosley determined to specialize in the 
raising of quail, although he expected 
to produce some pheasants despite the 
hilly nature of the surrounding country 
side. 
  To this end, he acquired last season 
thirteen pairs of quail and thirty pheas- 
ants. With this beginning, he produced 
last year some two hundred quail and 
about four hundred pheasants as breed- 
ing stock. 
  At the start of the 1932 season, Mr. 
Crosley augmented his breeding stock 
with a sufficient number of pen-raised 
birds to bring his entire stock of breed- 
ing quail to a total of two hundred 
pairs. This stock has produced approx- 
imately 8,000 eggs, many thousand of 
which have been hatched and young 
birds raised. About 2,000 pheasants' 
eggs were hatched during the season. 
  Some conception of the enormity of 
the task of raising these thousands of 
wild birds can be gained from the fact 
that more than forty acres of land on 
 
 
Pen-raised quail are hatched under bantams in these nesting boxes. The brood-

              coops are used to confine the hens while feeding. 
                                                                        295

 
  

					
				
				
 
The GAME BREEDER for October, 1932 
 
 
the Crosley preserve is devoted entirely 
to the work of breeding, hatching and 
raising the young chicks to maturity. 
Thousands of pounds of grated hard- 
boiled eggs, lettuce, biscuit meal, barley 
meal, alfalfa meal and cracked grain 
will be consumed by these birds in addi- 
tion to the fresh clover and grass eaten 
while in their movable run-ways. 
  The breedin 
 
 
quail live in com- 
fortable laying 
pens--one pair to 
each pen-which 
are light, airy and 
clean and have 
spacious run-ways 
to allow the birds 
room for exercise. 
The pens are 
moved frequently 
in order to pro- 
vide the quail 
with an ample 
supply  of fresh 
growing grass and 
alfalfa. The Cros- 
ley breeding field 
 
 
contains     two 
hundred     such    Mr. Crosley and J 
breeding    pens.                  of t 
Eggs are careful- 
ly collected once a week. During the 
laying season it is not unusual to find 
seven eggs in a single nest, although 
these birds will usually average about 
35 to 40 eggs in one season. 
  From the laying pens the eggs are 
placed in storage where they remain 
until set under bantam hens. Bantams 
are used in hatching quail eggs because 
of their light weight. An ordinary 
chicken would crush these delicate eggs. 
  In this connection it is interesting 
to note that Mr. Crosley found himself 
in a rather unusual difficulty. Before 
the current hatching season ended more 
than 300 setting bantam hens were 
required at the Crosley hatcheries. At 
the start of the season it occurred to 
no one that there might be trouble in 
locating enough bantams for this pur- 
pose right in the neighborhood. Such, 
however, proved to be the case, and it 
was not long before every available 
bantam hen in Jennings County was to 
be found on the Crosley preserve. Even 
then their numbers fell far short of the 
requirements and it was found necessary 
to ship in bantam hens from distant 
points. 
  From   twenty-one   to  twenty-three 
days are required to hatch a setting of 
quail eggs and, following hatching, the 
bantam hen with her brood of about 
twenty tiny quail is transferred to a 
brooding pen in which the young quail 
remain until maturity. 
 
DESPITE the fact that pheasant rais- 
    ing is considered more in the light 
 
 
of a side line at Sleepy Hollow, where 
the principal activity is to be that of 
quail propagation, this phase of the work 
there is rapidly assuming sizable propor- 
tions.  Whereas some 400     Ringneck 
pheasants were raised last year, Mr. 
Crosley raised more than a thousand 
of these birds this season. 
  Of the pheasants raised last season, 
 
 
ohn Y. Eller, his gamekeeper, beside one 
he portable pheasant pens. 
 
  Mr. Crosley added about 150 birds to 
  his stock of thirty breeders and liberated 
  the remaining 250. Although it was 
  discovered that the freed pheasants for 
  the most part lost little time in leaving 
  the hilly haunts of their nati-vi   or 
  the marshy lowlands which are more to 
  their liking, Mr. Crosley nevertheless 
  expects to liberate several hundred more 
 
 
More than 150,000 trees have been plan 
           on his preserve in the past t7 
 
of these beautiful wild fowl this season. 
This public-spirited action on the part 
of Mr. Crosley is expected to go far 
towards restocking Indiana with pheas- 
ants, particularly in view of the fact 
that at the present time there is no 
open pheasant season in that state. 
  Mr. Crosley's present breeding stock 
 
 
of more than 175 Ringneck pheasants 
are housed in a breeding pen divided 
into twelve large compartments, each 
approximately sixty feet long and ten 
feet wide. About twelve hens and two 
cocks are enclosed within each compart- 
ment. 
  Pheasant eggs are set under common 
hens and, after hatching, the hen and 
her brood are transferred to the pheas- 
ant rearing field. Unlike the young 
quail, the pheasants are not confined to 
enclosure pens but, after they are three 
days old, are permitted to range at will. 
This is for the reason that pheasants 
remain tamer than do quail. 
 
IN addition to the extensive pen quail 
   breeding activity  under way    this 
season on the Crosley preserve, Mr. 
Crosley  acquired  approximately   250 
wild quail early this spring which were 
later released in covies of three pairs of 
quail each. These birds have paired off 
so that additional covies have been raised 
in the wild during the late spring and 
summer months. 
  Much work is being done here this 
season to provide a suitable natural 
haven for quail to thrive and multiply 
in a wild state. Many acres of the land 
formerly under cultivation are being 
allowed to revert to natural wildness. 
Promiscuous grazing of stock has been 
stopped, thus saving for the birds the 
seeds of many weeds on which they 
thrive. In addition, throughout the en- 
tire estate, areas are being spotted of 
from one-half to an acre of ground, 
which are to serve as cover for birds. 
These areas, which will be allowed to 
                           1IJ   aiiý at 
 
 
grow   ra 1x, are 
being planted in 
Kaffir corn, millet, 
cane, buckwheat, 
sorghum-all of 
which serves the 
dual purpose of 
providing both 
ample cover for 
birds and a boun- 
tiful food supply 
throughout the 
winter months as 
well as summer. 
As a further pre- 
caution in assur- 
ing an adequate 
food supply for 
t _.1 . .. :1  _ 
 
 
                      Dorn quail anu 
'ted by Mr. Crosley   pheasants, more 
'o years.             than 225 pounds 
                      of lespedeza feed 
 has been planted in suitable locations 
 about the preserve. 
   A constant warfare is being waged 
 on the Crosley estate against the natural 
 enemies of bird life. Snakes, hawks, 
 weasels, mink and other carnivorous 
 animals which prey particularly on bird 
        (Please turn to page 320) 
 
 
296 
 
 
i" 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
The GAME BREEDER for October, 
 
 
   Your Game 
 
        Preserve 
 
 
                p 
 
 
 
 
   Does it provide the 
     sport it should? 
 
     Many thousands of dollars 
   are spent annually in unsuc- 
   cessful efforts to provide good 
   shooting on the private pre- 
   serve. Often a less amount, 
   judiciously expended, would 
   achieve the desired result. 
 
   Careful Planning is 
          Essential 
 
     The foundation of success- 
   ful operation is a carefully 
   prepared plan for develop- 
   ment and maintenance, based 
   on the desires of the owners 
   and the possibilities of the 
   property. Making the most 
   of these possibilities necessi- 
   tates careful analysis of the 
   situation by persons skilled 
   in this line of work, on which 
   the system to be followed is 
   based. 
     A staff of thoroughly 
   qualified specialists experi- 
   enced in the establishment, 
   development and manage- 
   ment of game preserves, is 
   maintained  by  The Game 
   Conservation Society. Its ser- 
   vices may save you many 
   times the moderate cost in- 
   volved. 
   For further particulars write 
 
      Service Department 
 
The Game Conservation 
        Society, Inc. 
    205 East 42nd Street 
    NEW YORK, N. Y. 
 
 
mostly because in its concentrated form 
it saves me a few trips to the feed 
dishes.  I  have  raised  hundreds  of 
guineas to maturity with nothing but 
dry mash. In fact, my old guineas much 
prefer their dry mixtures to their hard 
grains. 
   And there does not seem to be any 
 trouble with mites or internal parasites. 
 Guineas are, apparently, proof against 
 both. I know that I must have brought 
 in lice on many of the farm broody 
 hens that I used to use, but they never 
 lasted. One winter I kept a couple of 
 hundred pigeons in the top of my 
 brooder house. I know that these birds 
 had lice. The following spring I raised 
 young guineas there. There have never 
 been any lice. What a devouring hoard 
 of mites would have descended on a 
 bunch of ordinary chickens under such 
 conditions! 
   But I am getting off the subject. This 
 article is merely the tale of an attempt 
 to take some of the exacting detail out 
 of pheasant raising. A great many rules 
 have been violated, but these birds are 
 big and strong, and I have already seen 
 cocks get up on some raised place and 
 give their raucous cry with as much glee 
 as if they            o  out in their 
 
 
 
 
      (Continued from Page 296) 
life are being controlled as rapidly as 
possible. In an effort to effect a truce 
with the foxes which over-run this 
wild, hilly country along the Muscata- 
tuck River, Mr. Crosley has already 
released nearly two hundred rabbits in 
an attempt to stock this section with 
cottontails which -unfortunately for 
Mr. Cottontail-are considered by foxes 
a much more toothsome delicacy than 
either quail or pheasant. 
 
REFORESTATION          activity makes 
    up no small part of the far-reaching 
conservation program now unfolding 
on Mr. Crosley's 1500-acre Indiana pre- 
serve. Last year 50,000 walnut trees, 
25,000 locust, and 15,000 spruce and 
pine were planted, while thus far this 
season, 54,000 spruce and pine, 14,000 
tulip poplars, and a large number of 
walnut, locust and other species have 
already been set out. 
  There is nothing pretentious or luxur- 
ious about Sleepy Hollow or the manner 
in which Mr. Crosley and his guests 
live while there. The principal building, 
the hunting lodge, is a modest cosily 
constructed affair built along the lines 
of comfort and ease rather than show. 
Its setting, however, is a lovely bit of 
rare primitive scenic beauty overlook- 
ing a broad sweeping bend of the 
Muscatatuck River and over-shadowed 
 
 
Heads, fur rugs, birds, animals, fish, 
horns, skins to order-also for suale. 
Tannng; ladies' furs. For the Taxi- 
dermist trade glass eyes, skulls, tools, 
scalps, etc. We buy bright colored birds 
that die--also foreign animals. 
M.A. HOFMANN,989Gates Ave., Bklyn, N.Y. 
 
 
320 
 
 
     PHEASANTS 
  If you are looking for strong healthy 
breeders, I have just what you want 
in Reeves, Pure Versicolor, Melanotus, 
Amherst, Golden and Silver Pheasants. 
Why not have the best when it costs 
you no more? Live arrival guaranteed. 
 
   JOSEPH FLORES 
     R. F. D. 935 First Ave. 
     SAN LEANDRO, CALIF. 
 
 
      GULF BROOK FARMS 
      Pheasants-Game Birds 
           Fancy Fowls 
 Now booking orders for hatching Eggs. 
            Price list free. 
            H. E. Palmer 
28 Colony Rd.     West Hartford, Conn. 
 
 
BOOKS ON ALL OUT- 
    DOOR SUBJECTS 
 
      Consult our partial list 
    of books on page 324. The 
    book you wish may not be 
    there but we can fill your 
    order if it's in print. 
      Ask us to recommend the 
    book  for your particular 
    purpose. 
        Book Department 
 
 THE GAME BREEDER 
205 E. 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 
 
 
WHEN- 
it comes to hold- 
ing pens or game 
bird enclosures-if 
you want to do the 
job right read page 
22 of our catalogue 
on Crown Pen Pro- 
ducts for birds and 
animals. A post- 
card will bring you 
a copy free. 
  CROWN 
IRONWORKS CO. 
ll09TylerSt.,N.E. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
 
 
1932 
 
  

					
				
				
 
          ~flut04s auaty Chapter 
          I" WLTO LSA@1O SUA 
 
 
          Involvin g fiesmaisi Iima 
 
 
 
 
th ?Umws, maios~t lol n   aran* 
 
   VaormolosofIsakWltn oas i ollbraio wt 
 
 
V. 
aI 
 
 
L*04 
*be% 
Ike 
001of 
TOU 
his 
 
 
     ,m birs - will plae tw   U   s 
a   it tt will p          ua1b t bot ta 
        mor ~d osseratiol.5 
 
 
      S. a* Re 
*atsw"t 1 alfinsezu i 
''eie      t 
t"la 
 
 
A theoe v  &,ro will  bewd 
 
 
 
&oepa to rpwithi tb  & 
 
 
 
throuht to  ftill~t  witt f!/e 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Es 
 
 
,   Davolv p.1,, t of   witab* meern pie**  fortt at bird 
"d aimals in Ow*trod spts.#p~ 
 
 
 
    ba  Lti o topoain of Pec4  ailt *l I Toldu 
 4onwttou posin of$ all 1=40 wihnt  raa 
"SH.TtZtv4 Ra Z, 
          ofafgOnitalwt h at  fto 
 famr :=  vv 04s soofma opria S 
 at heqv~vtme oww P& i u" Urd 0PPhebmAoro 
 
 
aa vepatma 
 
 
  ofitl topi        natural 001#i- . n 
  suitable0 fo  t  id  tt  oedtevil" i  n  o 
profto* 4t"  h  ~  ndto 42 l epn  oOo 
 
 
If 
 
 
     ottos a                    te . 
katfil *@ A 01 . Ntauld i, MS tielU s th W  t 
Pups of feedin the birds- This 1,9 a V"IV 15if~"  "t 
 
  

					
				
				
 
staions uuto W70 bid *xtlreuarl &4 e 
*5~t 
 
 
     At~ 
.t81od to.. 
of - hawks, 
so "b lonk a 
 
 
       Red eads V Vattw t4 
 bmtroar tisse by th   ~ 
Able fte    ~ths Gar   or butt" L, 
an a guet bxme and allow hi 
 
 
       TIe mmr of Water l4~o of the lands Of the 
hip is relte acor to h m*t          that M 
be shot without matrialelYrtngte00socr    o 
$too U*ossRRy forerdcints olwn  ev~ 
 
 
         Thesomt o ga* t be ktlls4 
  Thnthe       *9fro bmsr L 4Iy dosin tb 
assming they each take theirz0allt 
   kl theo         .  t  (o 
trat IS     arwe i e eY 
tnmh, (Itis     .W is a 
   daily ~ ths.Uktsaesl to bmtmr Vi 
that he is to pay for 4au ( *ba tat Kaish 
 
 
V4V    11451  ~ t  
    no"~bi i.~mt th eglMut 
 
      The sportena sue "trn o the hous after UsR bol 
an gvethe f Iw ~iaeoua t.8eo of the kill and ti his 
oard ~ * 1akt h  amr 
               RXILT HOIDFORFOMPOGu 
 
 
esolve the 
-   S6I' 
an doxa 
the tame] 
 
 
rura 
 
 
gM~jj?=OOM WTUI~SAA WALTNK 
 
 
tam, 
              MULATION OF IMT 20 
 
 
toerre out     pots bl lau 
 
 
Vy 0. 3C. yaVerIts, Prosid#nt 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
"March V11,1931 
 
 
Mr. C. E. Favorite. President 
I taak 'Talton Le~af- 
Thmntington, Indiana 
 
Dear Mr. Favorite: 
 
          Troiw~h the Du Pont         I have received the 
pros--ectus of ,Mnr sp-ortunan-farmer gaememn7nn     etTLe 
I congratulate you on this plan an, wish ymi wmild mt me on 
your nallin list for all atuýe iaterial deIscrlbi your 
progress, 
 
          Will ym hindly sen a coiy of your plan avi all 
future material to the chairman of my comittee, Mr. John . 
Olin, Western Cartridge CGompa, M st Alton. Il7inois? 
 
          I rv~ enterini,, your nnme to receive a ci-mpllmmntar7 
coy of my G-u   Survey Re-port on the north central states, 
which -411 shortly be off the press. 
 
                             Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
                                   i LDO Lý O OLD 
                             In Maiaýe, Ga-me Survey7 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ce 
V =         r'ld 
 
 
A A. Am.J;I 0s-A  N6FA% AL s1ZJWJA-1JLJ. '        #Y 
 
 
URNAL 
 
 
                                                                        
                                                    Subsriton rc   50PrYa

"VOL. CXVI, No. 51                            CHICAGO, SATURDAY, DECEMBER
19, 1931                                             SursgiptiongPrece $,5.00
Per Year 
                                                                        
 *                                                      Snge Copy, Fifteen
Cents 
 
 
THE AMERICAN FIELD 
                  ]PUBLI5BID WE-KLY 
           WILLIAM F. BROWN, Manager 
             FRANK M. YOUNG, Editor 
         STEWART J. WALPOLE, President 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: 
  One year strictly in advance .......................... $5.00 
  Six montS, strictly In advance ................... 2.75 
  Foreign postage, $1.50 additional  Single copies. 15.cents. 
SUBSCRIBERS leaing home for a time may have their copies 
  of THE AMERICAN FIELD mailed to them regularly by 
  "notifying us of their temporary postoffice address. 
REMITTANCES should be sent by Postal Money Order Bank 
  Draft on Chicago or New York, or by R  ered Letter. 
  We are not res1onsible for currency remittances. 
NEWSDEALERS.--The Trade supplied by the American News 
  Co. and its branches, which are located in principal cities in 
  the United States and Canada. 
ADVERTISING.-THE AMERICAN FIELD is read In every 
  part of the English-speaking world. As an advertising medinm 
  for all lines of business none better can he found, as a fair 
  trial will amply prove. For advertising rates see "Notice to 
  Advertisers." 
DEPARTMENTS.-The     Departments of THE  AMERICAN 
  FIELD are Game and Shooting, Fish and Fishing, Natural 
  History, Travel, Kennel (which includes bird dog trials and 
  sporting breeds on the show bench; breedin an everything 
  pertaining to canine interests); Field Dog Itud Book regis- 
  trations, enrollments and transfers, and Answers to Corre- 
  spondents. 
CONTRIBUTIONS.-Contributions from all who are interested 
  in outdoor recreations,, and discussions for the betterment and 
  elevation of sportsmanship, free from personalities, are invited 
  for publication. 
THE AMERICAN FIELD does not assume responsibility for 
  views expressed by correspondents or statements made by 
  advertisers. 
MANUSCRIPT intended for publication should be written on 
  one side of-the paper only, and must be accompanied by the 
  writer's name and address, not necessarily for publication, 
  but as a private guarantee of good faith. No manuscript 
  returned unless postage is enclosed. 
ALL CORRESPONDENCE, upon any subiect, or for any 
  department, to receive attention, must be addressed 
     THE AMERICAN FIELD PUBLISHING CO., 
        440 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, Ill. 
 
 
Foaxiox Su 
  Breams 
  Price per 
 
 
  More than a millon acres of swaying reeas, flX/t- 
tering flags, clumps of wild rice, thick-growing lly 
pads, soft beds of cool green mosses, shimmering 
ponds and black mire and trembling bogs-such was 
Kankakee land. 
  Those wonderful fens or marshes, togeth-er with 
their wide-reaching lateral extensions, spread them- 
selves over an area that reached far into the neigh- 
boring state of Illinois and extended northeast from 
English Lake almost to South Bend and eastward 
along the Yellow River and its branches to Lake 
Wawassee. 
  The Kankakee was the natural drainage for the 
lake system of northern Indiana and by far the 
greatest habitat of wildfowl and fish in the entire 
United States if not of the world. 
  Near Momence, Ill., about a dozen miles or so west 
of the Indiana line, was a natural limestone ledge 
which, by the providence of Nature, acted as a nat- 
ural wing dam in maintaining the level of the waters 
in the western Kankakee Valley. Early in the late 
eighties the state of Indiana paid a Chicago firm of 
contractors the sum of $25,000 for the blasting away 
of this natural barrier to the flow of waters and thus 
began the first serious attempt at the draining of 
Kankakee land in Indiana, which continued until 
consummated in its entirety. 
  The country adjacent to the river was a broad 
plain varying In width from one to twenty miles, 
along the borders of which are sand ridges which 
give to the region the designation of Kankakee Val- 
ley, and which at first produced the erroneous im- 
pression that the great marshes were a low, irre- 
 
 
claimable swamp, whereas, the fact was that it is 
an elevated plateau with a mean level of ninety feet 
above Lake Michigan and six hundred and seventy 
feet above the ocean. The plateau has a slope west- 
ward of one foot per mile. 
  The water of the Kankakee was remarkably pure 
and clear and was regarded as exceptionally health. 
ful. Iran was found in solution, which was thought 
to add value to it, and for a time before the city 
of Chicago found a practical way to use the, waters 
of Lake Michigan it was seriously proposed and 
advocated that a considerable portion of the water 
of the Kankakee River be diverted by canal to the 
city of Chicago to become its source of pure water 
supply. 
  The fact was that the Kankakee Valley was a 
great natural reservoir of good water. The bed of 
the river and its tributaries was generally fine sand 
and gravel and the underlying strata throughout 
the valley are fine sand, increasing to coarse gravel. 
Clay beds and stone are rare. 
  Nearly every state has some dominant natural 
feature that serves some special purpose of nature 
in Its scheme of life or which exhibits some special 
interesting phenomena of nature. Many of these 
features have been preserved in national parks and 
reserves. The western states especially have been 
blessed by the generosity of the United States gov- 
ernment in creating great national parks. The state 
of California alone has nearly 30,000,000 acres in 
national, state and other parks, an area consider- 
ably greater than the entire state of Indiana. 
  Indtana, the richest piepe of cake ntowhich this 
great country of ours has been sliced, which has 
contributed greatly to the wealth of the~nation and 
the development of the West, has no great parks 
or reserves. 
  The Kankakee Valley was the greatest natural 
phenomena of the state. It was not only a region 
of great charm, mystery and surpassing beauty at 
times and places, but in the natural scheme of 
things served a great fundamental, irreplaceable 
purposes in Nature's scheme and plan. 
  Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, the three great states 
immediately south of the Great, Lakes system, are 
blessed by a flow of subterranean water which has 
its origin in the Great Lakes. It is this water which 
Is accountable for the marvelous fertility of these 
states. The Kankakeee, with its more than a mil- 
lion acres of water, was also a source of filtered 
water that contributed to the underground supply. 
  But more than anything else, more than any body 
of water in the world, the Kankakee contributed 
with amazing fecundity to the fish and waterfowl 
life of the entire Mississippi system. Practically 
every part of its more than million acres of shallow, 
living waters sereved as the most wonderful fish 
hatchery that Nature ever devised. In the Spring 
millions of fish swarmed in the great marshes to 
spawn in the warming, shallow waters, and each 
year in the Summer and Fall billions of fish de- 
scended into the Mississippi system to spread them- 
selves through every state Involved in that system. 
  Why are the fish disappearing from Indiana, Illi- 
nois, Iowa and Ohio, notwithstanding stringently 
administered laws? Twenty-five years ago Indiana 
had a population nearly equal to what it has today. 
Everybody had time to enjoy the good fishing. To- 
day there Is hardly any fishing for the few who have 
the patience to indulge the desire in this state. 
The same is true of all the central states. At grea' 
cost all these states and the Federal government 
have built fish hatcheries, but each year the returns 
are diminishing, notwithstanding the millions spent 
in these vain efforts. 
  Fish are a phenomena of Nature and man cannot 
destroy the natural cause and basis therefor with- 
out destroying the phenomena. No matter how many 
fish hatcheries are erected and how many millions 
spent thereon, there will never be good fishing in 
these central states until the Kankakee is restored. 
The Kankakee was a wonderful growth of the ages. 
It produced untold billions of fish every year and 
was. the finest natural waterfowl country of the 
world. 
  The famous wildfowl shooting places of the world 
never surpassed the Kankakee, and, In addition 
 
 
thereto, the Kankakee was a great. natural breed- 
ing ground for many varieties on account of its 
northern   locus. The draining of the Kankakee 
marshes crowded the ducks closely to the territory 
along the Father of Waters In their flights and this 
crowding was the opportunity for their slaughter. 
If the duck stock of this continent is to be saved 
it will be necessary for the Federal government to 
establish refuges, so that the ducks can fly over an 
extended terrain and thus prevent the annual mass- 
ing and slaughter. 
  The first and most important step in the estab- 
lishment of refuges will be the restoration of a 
portion at least of the former Kankakee marshes. 
How much should be restored depends upon the sys- 
tem devised, but the government should take a large 
view of this project and deal In terms of hundreds 
of thousands of acres. When restored to the place 
intended by Nature this valley will make liberal 
repayment in fish, shell fauna and aquatic life. 
  The work should probably commence near Mo- 
mence, Ill., where the first great destruction of the 
marshes began, and by a series of wing dams work 
eastward until a great area is reclaimed to Nature. 
The restoration of the Kankakee, when completed, 
will tend to right a great wrong, a great crime 
against the fish, wildfowl and aquatic life that was 
perpetrated by its drainage. 
  Those responsible for the destruction of this re- 
markable valley are essentially as those who might 
say, the sea is full of treasures, let's destroy it, or 
as says the bandit, the old people of the world have 
got al the money, let's kill 'ema To trekuure they- 
gained was soon spent, but the loss they inflicted 
was incalculable and increasingly felt these many 
years. 
  The almost infinite wealth of the Kankakee as a 
habitat of fish and wild life was detsroyed to un- 
cover land supposedly for agriculture and to more 
easily get at the flourishing trees whose feet were 
in the waters. Today hardly any calculator would 
buy the land and hundreds of thousands of acres 
are a burden upon their possessors. A fish hatch- 
ery costs several thousand dollars per acre to put In 
effective working order and many thousands each 
year to maintain, and the protected fingerlings that 
are raised disappear as they are planted. The Kan- 
kakee was a great natural fish hatchery, costing 
nothing to maintain, and can be again, and its fin- 
gerlings were to the manner born. Acre for acre, 
the Kankakee as a fish hatchery was worth double 
and triple any fish hatchery ever built by man. 
Added to that was its infinite value to wild life. 
These great values, this natural wealth, can be re- 
stored. 
  The government by the system inaugurated per- 
mitted this great crime to be perpetrated. The gov- 
ernment must supply the remedy and as far as 
possible restore this great natural reservoir to its 
place in the divine order of things. 
 
 
DECISION ON HOW TO TAX FOWLERS 
             UP TO COMMITTEE 
 
  Sportsmen of the country who rely upon the an- 
nual American Game Conference at New York for 
a reflection of nation-wide public and official senti- 
ment on game problems are still asking what the 
chaotic eighteenth session of December 1 and 2 
really accomplished toward saving the sport of 
waterfowl shooting, its chief object, comments a 
bulletin of the American Game Association, sponser 
of the meeting. 
  Reports of the conference show that it succeeded 
in clarifying an apparently hopeless situation, com- 
plicated by clashing local opinions regarding the 
existence of a wild duck      shortage, resentment 
toward this year's short-season waterfowl regula-. 
tions, and the appearance of two opposing plans for 
raising funds to finance the restoration of -water- 
fowl nesting, resting and breeding grounds. 
  After a heated debate, the 450 game leaders repre- 
senting state and national conservation departments 
and organizations, voted their promise to stand sol- 
idly behind the decision of a special committee. The 
purpose of this committee, not yet announced, will 
 
 
b 
 
  

					
				
				
 
             BETTER FARMER   SPORTSMAN RELATIONS IN INDIANA 
 
 
                         By - A. E. Andrews 
 
        "This report is written in reply to many inquiries relative

 to the five-county project in Wabash, Whitley, Wells, Grant and 
 Huntington counties, Indiana. Huntington county being in the middle 
 position. The purpose is twofold: First, to provide real upland 
 hunting; second, to give the farmers an opportunity for some rea- 
 sonable pay for their cooperation. 
        This fact is really the basic motive behind the movement, 
 from the sportsman's angle: That the no-trespass law has warded 
 off the sportsman and invited the law-breaker, the law-abiding man 
 being alienated from the land. To this should be added the disap- 
 pearance of game and of cover, and the cutting of woodlands'and 
 removal of plants providing feed for wild life, together with an 
 apparent increase in predators, including especially the sharp- 
 shinned hawk and the hawk owl, which in the five counties has been 
 especially numerous for the last year or two. 
        The-five counties are traversed by the Wabash River and such 
  tributaries as the Mississinews, Pipe Creek, Salamonie River, Little 
  River, Eel River, Clear Creek and Rock Creek, along some of which 
  are lands well adapted to forestry. 
        The Division of Forestry of Indiana has been especially ac- 
  tive, but, though it has accomplished much, its work has been small 
  as compared to the effort expanded. It has seemed to the sportsman, 
  - many of them at least -, that no farmer can be expected to 
  plant trees and wait a half century for them to mature, unless he 
  is getting an immediate return even though small. Our forest ex- 
  emption law provides for $1.00 an acre valuation, which would re- 
  duce taxes to 2 to 3 cents an acre; so any return from a forested 
  tract would be practically net to the land-owner. 
 
 
 
 
IIU ix 
 
  

					
				
				
 
558 
 
 
      Fred C. Stuck of Ohio, then field representative for the 
national organization of the Izaak Walton League, was in Huntington 
and suggested putting the five counties together, each county to 
select a township for an experiment with game improvement. The 
Leagues of the five counties approved his suggestion and meetings 
were held. 
      Huntington county led off, after the League meetings, with a 
session, on April 6, with the farmers of Lancaster township, which 
is a centrally located township of usual size, 6 by 6 miles, with 
average conditions, including both level, highly cultivated corn 
lands and some stream margins including those along the Salamonie 
River. Not a single objection came from any farmer present at the 
meeting and 26 farmers signed up acreages at the first session. 
In addition, the science teacher at the township consolidated 
school, where the meeting was held, offered to assist boys in rear- 
ing ringnecks. Since that date others have become interested. 
      Col. Richard Lieber, director of the Department of Conserva- 
tion, and Walter Shirts, superintendent of the Division of Fish and 
Game, lent their complete cooperation. Col. Lieber surprised the 
Waltonians by showing a complete knowledge of ringnecks both in 
this country and abroad, and he approved the idea that the farmers 
deserve compensation. 
      As this is written, the hatching season is opening and young 
birds probably will be in the charge of hens on the various farms 
of Lancaster township by the time this is published. 
      Details of the relationship between the farmers and sportsmen 
have not been worked out. It is likely that each farmer will have 
a certain number of permits to issue at a specified charge when the 
time for hunting comes, which will not be until the state is open 
for pheasant shooting.   Three methods of charging have been sug- 
gested: One is a trespass charge; second, a charge by the amount 
of game killed; third, a charge for trespass plus a charge for game 
killed. The decision on these points is to be left very largely 
with the farmers on the theory that they cannot overcharge, be- 
cause, if they do, no one will pay. On the other hand, they have 
as much right to make their own charges for the city man's enter- 
tainment as the city theater owner has to charge these farmers for 
their entertainment in a theater. 
      Quail also are to receive attention and it is hoped that an 
actual propagation program can be worked out with them as well as 
with ringnecks. 
      There is a strong sentiment in Lancaster township for restor- 
ing forests and Joe Kaylor, assistant state forester, when in 
Huntington recently, offered his cooperation. He suggests conifers 
for protection and feed." - From Indiana Farmer's Guide, Huntington,

Indiana. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                             STA*LIOHED ISO* 
 
  

					
				
				
				
				
				
				
 
 
THINGS TO THINK ABOUT 
 
 
       Gray Squirrel in England                  PAGE DEVOTED TO       CONSERVATI
                    Hawks and Owls 
 
   A lesson for those who are forever advo-           FROM VARYING ANGLES
                   To th   w         s      o     n 
 cating the planting of exotic gameces              The Bob-white in Indiana
w            .called game farm, which is usually a place 
 is afforded by England's experience                The Bo-ht        nIdaahhere
pheasants are reared under domestic 
 our own gray squirrel. About the year 18       A letter from a member of
the Indiana         I and turned loose for sporting purposes, 
 a few of these sprightly animals were lib r- State Audubon Society tells
of her effort to it oes not seem so unreasonable that the 
 ated in the famous Woburn Park in Bedf d-   have the bob-white removed from
the list  owners should take steps to prevent their 
 shire. They were much admired, and    eir   of birds that may be hunted
for sport. The   birds from being picked up by the bird-kill- 
 possessors were envied. Others were tur ed  arguments advanced in opposition
to this by  ing hawks. From owls these birds can be in 
 loose in the London Zoological Gardens in   the hunters and "conservationists"
have a  but little danger, and game farms are not 
 1905. There were a few other introductions, familiar, if not a convincing,
ring. Many  yet common enough to figure much, either 
   The colonies prospered and extended their would not hunt except for the
quail; the  as replenishers of the game supply, or as 
ranges to such an extent that they covered   state would be deprived of the
license fees; detriments to normal wild life increase. 
many of the counties and they are still   the hunters would shoot quail anyway;
by      The real danger, however, to our vanish- 
spreading. They are now    described as a    allowing the birds to be shot
they were pro- ing hawks and owls comes from the multiply- 
national menace because of their depreda-  tected by the hunter and fed in
the winter;  ing of reports, by game producing or game 
tions on fruit and nut trees, and a great  that quail were increasing in
Indiana; that  exploiting organizations, of what are in many 
variety of garden and orchard crops, and on  the protective law in Ohio was
a failure,  cases isolated examples of undue destruction 
the eggs and young of both wild and domest-  and that the birds were not
increasing there, of game by these birds. From these a pub- 
icated birds. Now guns and traps are enlist-   But we notice that in Ohio
people seem  lic interested in wild life largely from sel- 
ed in their destruction and the threat of  very well satisfied with the kind
of protec-   fish or mercenary motives and little informed 
classification as a fur-bearer is threatened. tion they are giving the bob-white,
and that as to the true situation, is inclined to 
England is a country where the larger birds  some people there are kind enough
to feed  be encouraged to believe that predatory birds 
of prey are practically extinct and these  the birds without a high bag-limit.
Such  live mainly on game species and even 
natural checks cannot help.                  conditions will obtain too,
in Indiana.      that they are primarily responsible for their 
 
 
         The Unlucky Caribou 
   About a year ago we had occasion to 
point out that the Alaska Game Commission, 
in whose hands rests the fate of her game 
birds and animals-incidentally, these are 
probably her most valuable resources-had 
seen fit to impose a year-long open season 
on caribou over all that part of Alaska north 
of the Arctic Circle. We are now sorry to 
report a- further retrograde step in conser- 
vation-the extension of this condition to 
all the territory north of Yukon River. Only 
those who have become familiar with con- 
ditions in our northern territory, either by 
travel or study, can fully realize what this 
may mean to a species already greatly de- 
pleted. The reason for this extraordinary 
action is not divulged, but we suspect it 
 
   190 
 
 
arises from the inability of the authorities 
to police a region where a few stranded 
"sour-doughs" take a caribou for meat when- 
ever they need one. 
   We seriously question the wisdom of this 
action. The neighboring Canadian Province 
of Yukon where conditions are similar has 
not found it necessary to deny all protection 
to this interesting species, though there, as 
in Alaska, it has long been the custom to al- 
low natives and prospectors and travelers in 
need of food to take caribou at any time. 
This would seem in these days of increasing 
scarcity of nearly all forms of wild life to 
constitute a sufficient privilege. 
  Reference to the map will indicate the 
immensity of the area over which the cari- 
bou now receives no protection, even during 
the season of reproduction. 
 
 
  present rapid diminution. This, of course, 
  is not true. 
 
 
           Michigan Protection 
    An even dozen species of birds which have 
 earned, by their alarming decrease locally 
 the protection of the Conservation Com- 
 mission of Michigan, have recently been 
 given further protection by being exempted 
 from taking under "scientific collector's" per- 
 mits. The list includes the sandhill crane, 
 whooping crane, whistling swan, trumpeter 
 swan, loon, bald eagle, osprey, pileated 
 woodpecker, raven, Kirtland warbler, blue 
 grosbeak, and mockingbird. While scientific 
 collectors are reported not to have made 
 serious inroads on the scattered numbers of 
 these birds, the Commission feels that every 
 agency should cooperate to protect them. 
 
 
         Ruffed Grouse Hunting 
   Though a bill extending another year's 
 protection to the ruffed grouse recently 
 passed both houses of the New York State 
 legislature, Governor Franklin D. Roose- 
 velt vetoed the measure, thus ending the 
 much needed protection which the bird has 
 been given for several years. Previous to his 
 action, the Westchester County Conservation 
 Association conducted an elaborate survey, 
 report of which was sent to the Governor. 
 The survey showed that in Westchester 
 County at least, ruffed grouse were in no 
 condition to withstand hunting. The report 
 states: "Out of 96 field-trips in Westchester, 
 two years ago, the grouse was recorded only 
 17 times, with a total of 23 birds." Never- 
 theless, the wishes of the sportsmen's organi- 
 zations prevailed. It will be interesting-and 
 somewhat sad-to see whether hunters can 
find any more grouse than trained investi- 
gators can, now that the fellow-governor and 
cousin of the great bird lover, Theodore 
Roosevelt, has made it possible for this 
remnant to be destroyed in New York State. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
{A9 
 
 
The Historic Kankakee Marshes 
 
                                   By A. E. ANDREWS 
 
 
"M     ARSHES along the 
        Kankakee River            9'HE Kankakee mars 
        formed the last great     CAas a haven for wild 
        wild life refuge of In-   birds visited the huge exp 
diana. These marshes are now      mals, fish and birds enjo 
drainedand. dre throhe   mnost    out the region and spor 
drained and dry through most      journeyed to the famous 
of this year. What once was a     a bit of recreation. Ho 
wilderness for fur, game and      mercialism finally wrou 
fish is now given over to Span-   marsh was drained-rui 
ish n e e d 1 e s and stick-tights.  Now the sportsmen of th 
W h e r e once came President     to reclaim this great area 
Cleveland, General Lew Wal-       dition, It is a worthy u 
lace, a u t h o r of "Ben Hur,"   ceive the support of eve 
                           fe aested in conserving our 
Maurice Thompson, author of       terity.-EDITOR. 
"Alice of Old Vincennes," Em- 
erson Hough, author of "The 
Covered Wagon," and princes 
of Germany to shoot wild fowl and prairie chickens, is now 
not only a wilderness, but a waste. And the Izaak Walton 
League of Indiana has the hope of seeing restored to the 
citizens of the state the Kankakee in some of its old and 
historical glory. 
  This is not merely a state project. Its effect will be even 
international; for, as the breeding grounds of the Saskatch- 
 
 
The Kankakee today-straight as an arrow; interesting as a 
                 ditch--nothing more. 
 
 
                         ewan and Alberta produce game 
 at one time was noted   for the wild fowler of Posey 
'aterfowl. Thousands of  county, Indiana, so would a pro- 
ise every year. Wild ani- duction in the Kankakee relieve 
ed contentment through.  the Canadian provinces and im- 
nen from near and afar      theCadiactions of      ida 
arsh and waters to enjoy prove the attractions of Florida 
ever, the hands of com-  and Louisiana. For wild ducks 
ht destruction and the   are great travelers. 
ng its beauty and value.   To get the story of the Kan- 
middle-west are working  kakee we must think, not only in 
o restore its natural con.  terms of biology, but of geol- 
dertaking and should re- ogy; not in terms of our modern 
man and woman inter-     industrial age, but in terms oJ 
atural heritage for pos- ages; for it is true that the work 
                         that was done by Nature in 
                         thousands of years in the Kan- 
                         kakee was undone by man in 
less that a quarter of a century, and what was intended by 
Nature as a permanent wilderness and wild park has been 
turned into a ruin of weeds and brush by man in his illogical 
efforts to create a garden. 
  In the genesis of the story "the waters of the flood were 
upon the earth." Science says so, and there is the word 
                 (Continued on page 37) 
 
 
One of the old bends in the picturesque Kankakee of yesterday 
                -no, longer in evidence. 
                                              17 
 
 
hs 
w 
an 
'ye 
me 
Ut 
7w 
,gh 
nit 
'e 
n 
:ry 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
piece of weedy or high sedge grass cover. 
They do not know how to run in it, jump- 
"ing around ridiculously, and they become 
lost very quickly from their handlers for 
no other reason than the one that they are 
not permitted sufficient experience in it to 
develop their bumps of locality for coping 
with the condition instantly in a correct 
manner. 
   We are personally in love with the great 
 field trial dog individually but not collec- 
 tively. Its improvement is an eternal hobby. 
 Instead of merely now and then one field 
 trialer being a great bird dog in every 
 sense of the term, we would like to see all 
 of them, but this will not occur while pres- 
 ent training, the devotion to the sky liner 
 or the made-to-order courses persist. Nor 
 will it be either when championships are 
 repeatedly given to dogs that false point, 
 or fool persistently with footscent, or dogs 
 that point and run away off on the sky line 
 and pass up bevy after bevy. 
   The driven dog has to be subjected to 
some curtailment. The best way to effect 
it is by choosing real bird dog courses with 
the hazards which a real bird dog must 
encounter. The cover must not be dodged 
but encountered, even though the gallery, 
the judges and the press are forced to dis- 
mount and go through it to see what is 
occurring. Even looking at an all age dog 
on singles is preferable to letting it run 
away at a fast clip over a country without 
any objective. When courses are selected 
and the bird cover hazards are followed 
through, that designation, ground work, 
will in the future have such a negligible 
or fallacious significance. 
  What a travesty on a classy bird dog 
happens when it is forced to quarter or 
perform in full view of the judges what 
is politely referred to as ground work, on 
bare ground, with a big corn field on one 
side and a big weed field on the other flank- 
ing it, where common sense tells the dog 
birds ought to be, and yet he is meticulous- 
ly whistled away from either of the likely 
spots. Let every dog man having the inter- 
ests of the field trial dog, or shooting bird 
dog, at heart answer the question, which 
piece of terrain ought the highest class 
animal hunt over, and right then he will be 
able to answer for himself the question 
whether the outstanding trialers are real 
bird dogs or not. 
  An annual convention of amateur and 
pro-field trial clubs, with the motto of 
real bird dogs as their guide, would have 
a lot to do with the ultimate solving of 
many or most field trial perplexities and 
may result in changing the atmosphere of 
what is at present most baleful to dog 
interests. And, too, the actual significance 
of real amateurism will come to the sur- 
face. Today's perplexity when the word 
amateur is mentioned might readily be 
solved, for there are more amateurs right 
now who commercialize in dogs, bartering, 
selling and exacting big stud fees, than 
there are professionals who openly confess 
to training and handling dogs for a living. 
 
 
            Town Forests 
        (Continued from page 23) 
  "Second, for profit from the sale and use 
of forest products and resources. 
  "Third, for public recreation. 
  It is not only a question of town farm or 
town forest, now. It is a matter of farm- 
ing forests in the towns whose farms have 
been abandoned, leaving idle acres as an 
actual expense to the towns. 
 
 
  OUTDOOR                 AMERICA 
 
        Historic Kankakee 
        (Continued from page 17) 
 of another Genesis for it. Science points 
 to the sandy nature of the soil and other 
 signs and says all this was once a great 
 lake with its shore line to the south, 
 whence slopes the land to the Ohio River. 
 And science says that to the north lay the 
 ice barrier of the glacier. Then the land 
 partly drained and the ice melted. Many 
 rivers, mightier than those of today, flowed 
 over the land, washing out wide valleys, 
 and one of these valleys was the Kankakee. 
   It was a long stream in those days, rising 
in the south of Michigan, flowing through 
what are now Mendon and Three Rivers 
and Elkhart and South Bend, and contin- 
uing westward to tumble its tremendous 
ice-age current into the flood waters of 
the Illinois. 
   As the ice melted, the slope of the land 
was to the northward, and the stream broke 
in two in the middle, the tide sweeping 
north from South Bend, Indiana, to become 
what we know as the blue-clear St. Joseph. 
The remainder of the stream continued as 
it was, the brown-clear Kankakee. 
  During the time the Kankakee carried 
the waters of the melting glacier, its vol- 
ume was so great that it required a wide 
expanse. But as it continued only a short 
time, in the time-measure of Nature, it had 
not scoured out a deep valley when it 
broke in two in the middle. And that ex- 
plains why it is that the valley of the Kan- 
kakee today is as wide as it was in that age 
when the glacier yielded its grip on north- 
ern Indiana and retired into the depressions 
that have become the Great Lakes. 
  The Kankakee dwindled in size, but 
through the thousands of years from the 
ice age to this, it has continued. The 
gravel bars of the old valley became low 
ridges stretching over the level marshes, 
and on them grew oak and beech which 
produced feed for turkeys, geese, bear and 
squirrels. Red or yellow birch sprang up 
in groups in the lower ground and persist 
unto the present. Willows and quaking 
asp and cottonwood and sycamore are there 
despite modern destruction. But the low- 
land trees flocked to themselves and became 
swamp, leaving open, unwooded spaces that 
were to become the most famous marshes 
of all the world. 
NTO      this land came men, and they 
   called themselves Pottawatomies, as 
nearly as we can reproduce the word in 
letters. They gave names to places and 
streams, and even today their language per- 
sists and parts have been adopted into ours 
even as we have adopted many of the Pot- 
tawatomie devices and absorbed an un- 
guessed amount of his blood. The red 
man was crushed and removed as an indi- 
vidual, but his influence persists and his 
descendants have so proved themselves that 
not only do they succeed in our competi- 
tion but they are elevated to public office. 
  Romance? Yes; it is romance. But it 
is true romance; as true as geology, geog- 
raphy, ethnology and history. And if there 
were no other reason than merely to pre- 
serve something of the Indian's wilderness 
for the future to see, the salvaging of the 
Kankakee would be worth the while. 
  Much more than that, however, awaits 
success of the Indiana project; and that is 
the modern part of the story of the Kan- 
kakee. 
 
 
    A second installment of this story of 
  the famous Kankakee region will ap- 
  pear in the February issue of Outdoor 
  America. 
 
 
FREE 'ATreatforYo urDog 
   Send today for crisp, fresh, 
   appetizing samples of 
   Miller's A-i Dog Foods and 
   a valuable dog book. 
     Battle Creek Dog Food Co. 
152 State St.,   Battle Creek, Michigan 
 
 
Pointer 
   and 
 Setter 
 PUPS 
"&Ia point" 
 
 
MISSISSIPPI BIRD DOG KENNELS 
         LAUREL, MISS. 
 
 
)wn a Thorobred I 
Learn the difference hunting a 
thorobred keen nosed beagle, bred 
to find and trail game to the end. 
A thorobred is valuable 12 months 
of the year. They pay their way. 
Send 20c for official beagle magazine 
for hunting, breeding training and 
care of the greatest little s orting 
d on earth. Hundreds of world's best 
ed with pictures. 12 issues $1.50. 
NDS A HUNTING. 2 Park St., hecaur, 10. 
 
 
fish and other wild life. They 
need food. Something suitable 
for every condition. 99 varieties. 
Plant as soon as ice is gone. 
More material Included free on early 
orders. 35 years' successful experi- 
ence. For illustrated folder and 
helpfui auggeations, write 
TERRELL'S AQUATIC FARMS 
    119 L Blk., Oshkosh, Wis. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       For Import from EUROPE 
 HUNGARIAN PARTRIDGES 
 English Ring-necks, Dark necks, Chinese, Mon- 
 golian, Melaistie Mutant, Reeves, Pheasants-h 
 European Wild Turkeys--for December, January, 
 February shipment. 
                           WNC 1  . w7r le 
 
 
rlin Psrlridgei for the led eightese yeat. 
 
WHITE QUAIL 
ica's Largest Producer 
brown, native southern: also Im- 
r of Mexican bob white. Free 
range bred birds for restocking, 
and pen raised for pen breeding 
purposes. Delivery only, Decem- 
er to April inclusive. Fra Folder. 
Il. E. Bogle, San Antonio, Texas 
 
 
ITE COLLIE PUPS 
aet beautiful .jpeoimens the dog 
can offer. Home guards, loyal 
nions, useful and intelligent. 
3rices. Illustrated cirulars free. 
de Form Kennels, Gallon, Ohio 
 
 
UNTING HOUNDS                   JAmk 
   ~~$15 and up                l 
        Trial. Supplies. Catalog free. 
        Dixie Kennels, Inc. FMO6 Herriek, IlL 
 
 
37 
 
 
JOIN THE IZAAK WALTON 
           LEAGUE 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
  

					
				
				
 
u ~ ~ -Iit IvI n d  i ankk . 
 
 
    IAE PORTER 
 
 
 
 
 
    ,WG JASPER 
I I 
 
 
:BENTON       ' 
 
L                F 
 
.WARREN 
 
 
 
     FOUNTAIN  -j 
 
 
VERMI 
ION 
 
 
:VIGO 
 
 
       I F  1 
 
 
 SULRVAN1i 
 
 
        KNOX            - 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  GIBSON  --- 
 
POE WARRICK * 
 
 
/ 
 
 
"                   i 
 
 
Coppryght by Rand 
        MAD 
 
 
The Law Prohlbtli Copying or Reprodiuctlon by Any Process for Persomaf Use
or Resale. 
 
 
   L                               E 
 
 
 
 
 
 
      STARKE 
 
 
PULASKI     FULTON. 
  !        ,.T 
 
 
     H-ITOLEY     E 
     -- WHI ... ..A"LE 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
        1HUNTINGTONI 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          HIENRY 
 
F       kNCOCIJ 
 
             I   FAYETTi 
I 
 
 
 
    THLO iW  i    /-- T- 
 
                 XRIPLEY 
 
 
   _JENNINiGS 
 
 
   I 
 
 
 
 
 
 -I 
 
 --I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
---- 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
OHIO 
11 
 
 
i           Ir      i 
WHif TE  CASS 
 
 
     SiRR 
 
MECANOE HWR 
           -t 1o I -. 
                  'T IP T O N. 
 
iTa6ME~i fl..j -   - AMILTI( 
  a.     ---- -I .-,-- 
 
      t HEND RICKS  MARION 
 
 
 
          r--   -- ..JOHNSON 
 
 
 
       MONROE T--FuO. --B 
 
 
 
 
       -- N-E JACKSON 
 
 
 
 
    1iFO°       -    - 
Ois.   ,'R IN 
 
 
 
 
        I Fw-,, - ARISON 
   .-LL 
;iNCERj 
 
 
F i              RAND 
 
SLETER SIZ 
               IND 
 
 
I 
 
 
  
 
 
.n . t3 
 
 
MWNALLY 
E OUTLINE MAP 
 
'IANA 
 
SCALE 
MNaIly k Company, Chicago 
Z IN  U.  S. A. 
 
 
     I   riFERSON ~WaiT; 
 
 
 
-1- %LARK 
 
 
!                            I 
 
 
t 
 
 
-L 
 
 
ladism 
 
  

					
				
				
W 0 VJ-   C~AcA C~  (A-'*6 ýýPIt ýAd ý stKA4
I1LA 
 
 
Total2 
 
 
L'os 013 
 
 
-'e     Aar* 
 
 
    11001"  Lad Wastg14m 
in arw Is a~ Ywrw Nosl 
                  Yarm 
 
 
Aar* 
 
 
Mmr~  Mmr 
 
 
A8 m. 
 
  % O 
        Vhtre 
 
 
ft, 
 
Clayv 
LaSioss 
 
 
 
 
Pwike 
 
 
2169 ,1*0 
nl7,9*0 
 
 
294,4ý 3 
149ý.120 
 
*61'l7t0 
 
 
2, "9 
 
 
 
 
"2.029 
2,C41 
*2.41* 
2.2n" 
2.905 
 
  994 
 
 
636,5449 
241 ,M 
*28#2 
26<3,90 
 
 
 
 
7210,742 
 
 
118,10 
 
 
 
 
*4,136 
S."Z 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
44.793 
24.099 
 
 
65,854 
"0,9no 
 
 
14,8131 
 
 
 
24.264 
 
19,606ý 
 
14,649 
 
 
17,4619 "1,908 
19,63i; 14,996 
 
13,360  n4# 46O 
 
 
7.461   2A,990 
 
 
2.9-01  M.2164 
 
 
w,21  105,92:1 714,160 1.,. *,336 
 
 
Not*I I Tor v..~to4,1.a isin b41$- edc fwý' Cmasw 2to 'll other land
in  1'mo 
        5 ^o* for imael fpm for art ocuioe WýT '    e  Urn, grm, cmttlm
lot av4 
        othor 1=rvawi5t. 
 
lat. P:  For ltodoud )lot 1A Ifrms - D*utfr---       Am%- Not In farms*w'
 o-tt 
        *ce    for ar~t iDc=-ew 'b Zitil... wn and 411z wU sod area oacmi

        by R.I. and bijv,7 rights -way. 
 
 
        CAA A'JA 
 
 
zsýim 
 
 
"roe 
 
 
87,w4 
1047,50- 
 
80.411 
 
 
 
 
114.r7- 
 
 
86,050 
65'0r? 
 
 
24.7 
 
 
210 
 
41,42 
4? 
 
 
Trl"S 
 
 
4, "4 , TM -V,709 
 
  

					
				
				
				
				
				
				
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
Maroh 1, 1929 
 
 
        (Excerpt from Col. Lieber's letter to Gov. Leslie) 
 
 
Honorable Harry G. Leslie, 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
 
Dear Governor: 
 
            Pursuant to my conversation with Mr. Brown, I beg to sub- 
mit the following excerpt from a study of tax economics for thirty- 
three southern Indiana counties. An arbitrary line running east and 
west on the north edge of Monroe, Brown and Bartholomew counties, as 
shown on the accompanying map, leaves thirty-three counties for the 
southern third. 
 
 
Owen 
Monroe 
Broawn 
Ripley 
Dearborn 
Switzerland 
Jefferson 
Jennings 
Jackson 
Lawrence 
Greene 
 
 
Davie ss 
Pike 
"Martin 
Dubols 
Orange 
Crawford 
Washington 
Scott 
Clark 
Floyd 
Harrison 
 
 
Perry 
Spencer 
Warrack 
P sey 
Decatur 
Ohio 
Bartholomew 
Sullivan 
Knox 
Gibson 
Vanderburgh 
 
 
These thirty-three counties contain- 
 
 
25,3%/ of state population 
34.2, of land area 
44..2 of woodland 
 
 
 
54.1% of idle land 
 
 
-    743,044 people 
- 7,991,400 acres 
-    629,755 acres pastured 
     572,516 acres unpastured 
   1,202,271 acres total 
 
-    543,573 acres 
 
 
        TAX INO01MS AND  _PAY1T S of 29 counties 
(Excluding from the 3 listed - Sullivan, Knox, Gibson 
   and Vanderburgh) 
 
 
Total taxes collected 
          1921 
 
 
29 Counties 
 
 
1928 
 
 
State Tax 
  1928 
 
 
17,210,573.55 17,527,579.73 1,895,465.15 
 
 
Marion County 17,020,198.88   19,747,918.64   1,767,543.56 
 
(B) Remaining four counties (bounded by blue line) 
 
 
Vanderburgh,) 
Knox, Gibson) 
& Sullivan ) 
 
 
8,478,258.67 
 
 
9,119,526.02 
 
 
671,055.39 
 
 
40,128.65 
 
 
9,261,207.31   9,611,409.68 
 
 
(A) 
 
 
  S3chool Aid 
 
 
1,075,234.16 
 
 
None 
 
 
Lake County 
 
 
M93807.95          None 
 
 
[ 
 
 
f 
 
 
[ ........ 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
                  Total Taxea 
                         1921 
 
(C) (Marked by green X's). 
 
 
Collected       State Tax 
          1928       1928 
 
Take 10 typical forest counties: 
These ten pay: 
 
 
School Aid 
Repayment 
   19J28 
 
 
Brown, Jennings) 
Jefferson, Ohio) 
Switzerland, 
$cott, Harrison)    2,997,329.10   2,916,9b0,25   182,957.35    444,9 
Crawford, Perry) 
and Martin     ) 
 
(D) (Marked by yellow X's). If you add to these ten counties 
       five more - viz., Ripley, Jackson, Warrick, Dubois & Spencer -

 
The total fifteen pay: 
                    6,192,156.44   6,158,293.23   402,057.81    591,9 
 
 
Compared with the above fifteen, Allen County pays: 
 
                    5,556,204.44   6,448,604.32   715,472.84 
 
 
41.61 
 
 
89.18 
 
 
None 
 
 
and St, Jo seph 
County pays:        5,853,584.04    6,901,219.07   649,106.87       None

 
It should be noted that:                                         State Tax

 
The 29 counties paid in 1928 a total state tax of              $1,895,465.15

 
The 29 counties received back for school aid alone              1,075.234.16

 
                     Net contribution to State Government         820,230.99

 
                     Of which Public Utilities (Railroads, 
                     Bmks, Bldg. & Loans, Telephones and 
                     Utilities paid                 (1927)        230,860.76

 
                     While the City of Indianapolis alone paid $1,532,860.96

 
          The above statement reveals a momentus economic situation. 
It is bad enough as it stands and would be considerably worse if we were

 
to add all of the State aid received by way of highway construction, park

 
and forests maintenance, 3oard of Health activities, and the services of

 
our State eleemosynary, correction and penal institutions. The great 
 
resource of old was the forests of stately hardwoods, Agriculture and 
 
industry are notably restricted in this territory. 
 
 
I I 
 
 
of 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
          The solution of the many troubles of this southern third are 
 
first, contraction of counties and, in our particular field, reforesta- 
 
tion, extention of grazing lands, and last, but not least, the tourist 
 
business, aided by good higiways. 
 
                           Bibliography 
 
References: 
 
     U.S. Dept. Commeree - Census of Agriculture 1925. 
     Indiana Year Book - 1921 (for population). 
     Indiana Dept. of Public Instruction (for school aid) 
     Indiana Board of Tax Cormissioners (for taxes). 
     Data for 1921 by Division of Forestry, 
                    G. R. Phillips, Asst. State Forester, 
     Data for 1928 by Division of Forestry, 
                    Ralph Wilcox, State Forester. 
 
                             Respectfully submitted, 
 
                             Richard Lieber, Director, 
                             The Department of Conservation 
 
  

					
				
				
 
PRELIMINARY FOREST FIRE SURVEY FOR INDIANA 
 
 
Winter - 1928 - 1929 
 
 
% - Forest 
 
 
Land 
 
 
and Abandoned 
 
 
Area-Forest and 
Abandoned Land 
 
 
Clark 
Washington 
Floyd 
Crawford 
Orange 
Dubois 
Perry 
Spencer 
Martin 
Greene 
Lawrence 
Bartholomew 
Jackson 
Jennings 
Jefferson 
Scott 
Harrison 
Lonroe 
Brown 
Clay 
Owen 
Morgan 
Johnson 
Putnam 
Parke 
Montgomery 
Fountain 
Jasper 
Pulaski 
Newton 
Starke 
Ripley 
Elkhart 
LaGrange 
 
 
2,443,703 
 
 
County 
 
 
60 
35 
70 
70 
40 
35 
75 
30 
60 
30 
40 
45 
60 
25 
25 
25 
70 
50 
75 
20 
50 
55 
35 
20 
15 
15 
15 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
10 
10 
 
 
141,085 
112,388 
62,224 
135,195 
100,953 
62,493 
178,265 
74,294 
127,254 
51,861 
113,494 
32,236 
125,389 
36,604 
25,183 
25,310 
188,524 
119,728 
149,462 
25,978 
64,613 
93,569 
15,836 
41,360 
41,635 
20,082 
27,132 
41,849 
31,558 
50,637 
20,040 
55,810 
28,160 
23,702 
 
 
TOTAL 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
Uo' e t, C3 a7 - ý  ,. 'Ia Q 7 M VAnb 
 
 
         0ri- lo-  ok th .oZ aw6Q~ 
 
     Iiiaiua Ia~s Aate urs Game rorvers, -tate ?o5ta      00 
  cuwt esscrvor rquirini pito~~, 
     'li :Aztet meoias the prob1en ot its lead now   alrad 
 
     '% law provides aliirU prototioui,       J'a irite 
 
 
_, Foat A~ros _Jo '_arin. ludi 
 
          In 928s  20     L' ire In Jota. o_1y- 0 orts 
 
     (,Aila is eia~r-~riuult.uro ze  ttea  a,2,12 
 ruports,-1 
     Z66 fewest fie twosd li A~1,01 arure   ~u~o~      uf $ih 
 t~i.x was "62419 (exclusive or towerstqi         n  u.v~o) 
 
 
     (Indiana Yaok1920) 
 
     iaste 3erA 2,187,721  ,oroz 
     _A?,btir lad1ý1728     Oo 
        Qtutl  5#5740VO -area 
      -,ure - -.*e, tý.t t of 0to n .,iQ~ 
      3,*uties show 2,44Z,70Z area of naieold rields 
 *alý ul t-'orest aoyew- ýrI'n ed£     oe    u4 
 4,  r  1 Eiw  ý0oasi  -ý,o tink. @1ro wa) 
 
 
          ivoret .,orvioe and ,man#, of ,tate Airoree.rahv  dp 
        aa areas  standrdbasis, 
      ýA eountios - 2t44L#70;ý o~ras 74 
 
 
 
      Ohio with 2/Z as L~ut Lzzd reqjrit urtsi   zi as4 Czk~e  a 
 about 1, Uawers aad u-aai   wrets  n1ap,)its 
 "022,O a year. 
 
 all iave a Zirost f)ro -waa* 
 
 
 
 
             -fire tlwcerv - telpill)na limes -distrists -adawo 
             wnrden and, ,local. wairden . o reesi~ve ylO h 
               fi1t I a fire, 
        ~       oeal wardens anortgzz~mt1ion, f ire 1vials as 
                  walces, ~ ''al tooias a~, a wre     n 
 
         - 'ower         tol rote teat.00 Laeres, ý3 tora e 
      ace xos will'ý ý'ortýt         orvic aors~d 2ý:40

      "R20Qowsxa1*Ui",i ,=6,yor) z,~ 
 
  

					
				
				
 
R. F. PECK, PRES.              )VAR HENNINGS, V..PRES.               C, R.
HUFF, SEC'Y              D. K. STEPHENSON, TREAS, 
CASSOPOLIS. MICH.                  SOUTH BEND, IND.                   SOUTH
BEND, IND.                   SOUTH BEND, IND 
 
 
PRINTED IN U. S. A 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
"WILD BIRD REST" 
 
 
           We have been fortunate indeed in raising seven Canadian Geese

this Spring, bringing up the combined flock of this rare bird to a total

of twenty seven. We lost only one goose over the winter, which is un- 
usual in a flock of twenty one birds. The young geese have grown so 
rapidly that they are now fully feathered out and will be flying within 
three weeks and a wing trimming party must be staged soon or we will have

a general migration of our decoys. 
 
           The cold, wet weather has been disastrous to young ducks, a 
hundred and fifty or more having died from one cause or another. The flock

now stands at forty birds and together with the Canadian Geese all the de-

coys necessary are available. We hoped for a surplus of ducks that they 
might be distributed to the South Bend sanctuaries, but 350 duck eggs al-

ready placed on these newer units is all we can do this season. 
 
           A careful survey of the "Bird Rest" situation shows
a bigger and 
brighter outlook than ever.  Several broods of Wild Mallards were hatched

and reared on the ponds in addition to a family of "Coots" or mud
hens. 
These birds are now living with our decoys and flying all over the district.

The first flight of young birds was noted July 7th, which, seemingly, is

several weeks early for this locality and an early migration is anticipated.

 
           Steps are now being taken to place the 300 acre tract under the

direction of the Michigan State Conservation Depaitment. With this declara-

tion the "Bird Rest" will become a State Preserve* It will be policed
by 
the State and no hunting will be permitted within 150 feet of its boundary

line. This will include both banks of Christiana Greek where dozenh of 
ducks were killed last Fall. 
 
           That "Bird Rest" and Izaak Walton members imy thoroughly
compre- 
hend and appreciate the project, an auto road is being laid out within the

groundso When it is completed a circuit of a mile or more will permit 
the motorist to view the decoys on the ponds and see wild birds in their

normal state. Wild ducks do not fear an auto, while it is moving, but the

click of a door causes fright and flight.' This auto road venture is merely

an experiment and nothing elaborate should be anticipated. It doubtless 
will be a mere trail at first, but, should the idea be popular, a dam or
two 
necessarily must be widened to permit cars to drive through the heart of
the 
district where migratory birds thrive. 
 
           Out there now there are actually thousands of polliwogs just losing

their tails and becoming frogs. The long legged birds are having a great

feast as the tadpoles are so thick they can be scooped up by the handfuls
in 
shallow water, 
 
           Fully 00% of the 2000 pine trees planted by the Boy Scouts last

spring are growing. The wet season has been wonderful for trees. 
 
           An experiment is being conducted in feeding and attracting ducks,-

an area a hundred yards in diameter is being fenced off in the center of
the 
feeding grounds where feed will be kept constantly and the decoys thus being

fenced out will not be able to gorge on the surplus feed while wild birds

will always find food available* 
 
           Between three and four hundred bushels of grain were consumed
last 
Fall and in carrying the decoys over the winter. The new crop of oats, 
wheat and corn, of course, will not be available in quantities for some time.

 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
-2-. 
 
 
            The ponds are all running over, we have plenty of water. The

 decay flock is the most attractive ever and we seemingly are all set for

 our biggest season, except that more feed is needed. 
 
            Probably the greatest single accomplishmer* resulting from the

 conservation lesson demonstrated out at "Wild Bird Rest" is the
establish- 
 ment of the 10,000 acre game and bird sanctuary area here near South Bend.

 Actually a hundred or more people are taking active interest in redevelop-

 ing local game resources and their continued effort will undoubtedly put

 game back here on a definite basis. 
 
            The greatest task facing the local enthusiasts is the curbing

 of poaching. Considerable propaganda must necessarily be spread to cause

 the local population to permit quail, pheasants, ducks, etc. to remin and

 live within the city limits. At the present time if a duck alights on the

 river it is immediately shot or stoned out of town; a quail or pheasant

 looks like part of a meal and the inborn idea of killing for possession
pre- 
 vails. Within the city limits and in the sanctuary areas this habit must

 be overcome. 
 
            Reports from the various sanctuaries surrounding South Bend are

 as follows: 
 
         TWYCKENHAM                      1000 Acres      Milton Kile,   Mgr,

 
 15 out of 28 Pheasant eggs hatched.   13 alive. 
 10 covies of quail on premises. 
 We are still searching the market for black squirrels and if anyone 
 knows of a source of supply we shall appreciate the information. 
 
         TWIN BRANCH BIRD REST .900            Acres     G. W. Schmidt, Mgr.

 
 24 out of 36 Mallards hatched. 
 2 flocks of Quail on promises° 
 2 pair Grouse on premises. 
 17 Pheasant eggs due to hatch. 
 
         NOTRE D&ME UNIVERSITY          3,000 Acres      Brother Florence,
Mgr. 
 
 Decoy flock increased to 87 Mallards and 4 Canadian Geese; 65 young ducks

 raised this spring; 30 Pheasant eggs due to hatch; Old Ring Neck and Silver

 Pheasants doing fine; 100 small birds banded and reported to Biological
Survey,- 
 20 different species included. 3,000 Blue Gills and Black Bass planted in

 lalms. 35 men have shown hctive interest and are seemingly enthused over

 nature subjects. Bad weather killed most of the incubator birds. 
 
         COQUILLARD LAND AND INVESTMENT CO. 720 Acres    Russell Smithp M

 
 15 out of 16 Pheasant eggs hatched.   14 alive. 
 One hen still setting. 
 5 covies of quail on premises. 
 
          ST. MARYS ACADEMY              2,O00 Acres.    S. G. Hobart, Mgro

 
 9 Mallards raised ard about ready to fly. 
 32 Pheasant eggs due to hatch. 
 30 small birds banded, inclding 9 species reported to Biological Surveye

Spring storms and cold weather disastrous to young ducks, as 65% of incubator

eggs did not hatch and of the 22 hatched only 9 survived. 
 
            CARLISLE MANOR - 
            GREEN EMMJE    FARMS-          340 Acres     C. A. Carlisle,
Jr. 
 
 
Cages being constructed for Pheasant and Quail breeding. 
 
 
Grounds posted. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
-3- 
 
 
A. H. TYLER 
 
GEO. DAVIES 
 
M. S. CALDWELL 
 
GEO. HEPLER 
 
CULVER 
 
 
- South Bend 
 
 
     it   It 
 
- Chain OLakes 
 
- Culver, Ind. 
 
 
28 Pheasant eggs due to hatch, 
 
Pheasant and Quail Cage under 
construction. 
Weasel destroyed 14 Pheasant 
Eggs. 
Skunk destroyed nest of 17 
Pheasant Eggs. 
17 out of 28 Mallards hatched. 
 
 
3,000 Blue Gills and Black Bass planted in Clear Lake 
3,000        It    it   it                " Chain Lake. 
 
 
                 This somewhat lengthy but complete report will give you

an idea of the general local activity in bringiig back the birds. Ninety

per cent of the people want nature preserved, but five per cent do the work

and pay the bills. Some of us are doing more than our proportionate sharep

but are enjoying it, 
 
                  So - come on - "loosen up" a bit and let's buy
some corn. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
'4 
 
  

					
				
				
 
       a."              ,A,,lkALAMAI~ 
       r4~*~ ~ .~   #, ~. VA"~ ±  o, 
#7T 'o                   t"       V441 4fV p t449 
       ,. ~ ~          ~*Now I)    __ ,44 
 
 
 
     ti                  SJ SUP1IjPA $ ILLS DAL 
        IR              .s.j ikP o'          - 
 
 
     ooK 
 
 
     -W I 
S-. 
 
 
 
 
 
  KANKAKEE    ' 
  SA %  A)4*i  A  44 l pc 
 
 
 
 
  I ' DANPOT a jell o'~~o 
  - ,0 
ojfFTOQUOS 
 
     T  'P BENTO 
 
 $         J. 
 too  . 41 o.4' 
 
    601011ARREI 
 
 0411 WOO Wr 
   I RM Io  L, 
 
WI4PAIGN GN 
2.~.1LI.! IJ "  IE ATS.' 
 
     jp~Oi4A4   p 
 
 
VI LLIAMS 
 
 
 
7PEFIAN'( 
 
MI~ 
 
 
DAULDI NC 
 
 
 
 
AN WER 
 
 
 
 
 
qERG %i 
 
 
 
 
 
:)ARK tL 
 
 
   ~40 0tr6 , I i*y !                 'r~*'*:~~ 
             * - ~ ~ ~ 9 e' "7L*  Y N l(W411 T u 
      to0IN0?_ 
 
         PAR    HENDRIC MAR'   ___ N1, stPREBLE 1 
 
 
             1,04ý     A         U N I 
   LES 01 39                    'LI 
   A . I oo 4             Y 1- - / ' " F FT 
 
AnRL                 OHA i 4 *t~''I~ 
             .1     It.0 ' A9 
      ARr              ART 1+ %0..SFq 
      '       t RMN 9O NRO        I w-v ,o EL 
 
      0~-J          R op p~ .-c-w* l                 r 
 
 S E CRAWF40 ' ' E .'4' A EC oJ U  . 
       or__<_.AI ?.. F4',ý I o. E.0NN o GS 
 II IceL Vol"    toy'ý'V~ A TI & 'IR' 9AA 
 
        : '4D~ylESS ~ .ar 03o   f.. 
               'p4' ~ ~ Kp, I"'o ~W S 1 G ~  x 
  "'o                 K50N ..- ~ '{ ~ ~' eF~v~~~ W N 1r 
 
 
 
 
           wA     >lot k cpaON        "m 
 
   :RI CW"L       t,   ;7-                     A 
 tI ,;IKN X0iDVIS 1iaikS 4O     e 
 II?.11,,r1Jp00M           ow' RtP)?lHAN.TNi 
 NW   .ER --0 
      ,s ~4,   BRE0KIN.A*  NELSO 
 
   -~~ 00      "Ov   yy           OWEN Kimb~,cpMIL H RIN'WAH4G 
      UNJON          UWvCA W 
             ~J04~ ~ I F NJ~t I4~' ~' ~ ~" AR IO N~~ . 3 
 
 
Green-1927. Purple--1928. 
 
 
Rmed--Infested in 1926. 
 
  

					
				
				
				
				
 
ladimna 
 
 
BENTON 
SIT 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   IFýOUNTTAIN 
 
 
I VERMI "K 
j ION 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SULýVA    j 
        FIREENE 
 
 
       KNOXXD~ 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
         PIKEP 
                   jDU 
GIBSON 
 
 
IVANDii: WAR[ICK 
    U, 
 
 
ILAKE   ,PORTEF 
 
 
 
 
       JASSPER 
 
NEWTON 
 
 
+WHIFTE     CAS 
 
 
      {CARROLL1~- 
 
ECANOE 1          HOWARD 
        'CINTON       71 R- -- 
                   "..1TIPTON 
 
'TOO'EI~"--O O - -  " HAMILTC 
        BOON 
 
 
PU3TNAM1 .HENDRICKS MARION " 
    UTNA 
 
 
 
          6RGAN     IJOHNSON 
 
 
    M .ONROE       ow--'-- BA- 
       I     II 
 
 
                   .JACKSON 
1      1  - -RT-- " 
I" 
 
 
 
 
 
       IEw-, ' HARRISOT 
 
ENCER1  L 
 
 
       , T liARKE HALL j 
 
     4- 1 
;PULASKI  ULN 
 
 
FLOiDtRADr 
              LETTER SIZE 
 
                 INDI 
 
 
Copyright by Rand MV 
         MADSK I 
 
 
                 70EALLE 
 
W --A - IE 
 
 
i m 
 
 
M4;NALLY 
OUTLINE MAP 
 
ANA 
2ALE 
Nally & C(onpany, ChluCo 
N( V. 5. A. 
 
 
The Law prohibits Copying or Reproduction by AMY Process 90V B'ersosf Use
Of Rtesale. 
 
 
15 
 
 
s 
IS 
 
 
--I 
 
 
        - H..N.TN.ToN . 
                  Lis 
 
 
    'GRANT, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 HEN-I 
        *            jWAYNE 
T FiiCOC                    I 
 
         DRUSH IAL 
                   1FAYETTE 
 
                   FRANKLIN 
 
THOLOMEW             -'--- *" 
                   RYIPL.EY 
 
     jJENNINGS 
 
 
           r-EFFERSO-N IWTZI 
 
 
   S6COTTLAK 
      CLARK 
 
 
>, 
 
 
9 
 
 
II 
 
 
, 
 
 
. 
 
 
"ION 
 
 
 
 
ORoo_ 
 
 
2 
 
 
O3HI 
k"N1 
 
 
]                          I 
 
 
i 
 
 
I  %% 
 
 
|                         * 
 
 
!   _   |     _a 
 
 
r==,;__ 
 
 
'Fire LIIW Irohlblim (ep'lltl or Rept.odueilo b' AilF ]Jhroells for Versolul
17se Oar ]Kemble. 
 
  

					
				
				
 
Feb. 1, 1927 
 
  

				
      
      
				
				
 
9a C t CA) IR £) VTA OL.-Vi 
 
 
QAAW 
 
 
II 
14 
ch ka4kf C., 
 
  

					
				
				
 
g.                      87'        L.d, lint                            
 at fe.,,,lfr  W 
 
 
        "R 
 
 
 
 
        JASPER 
NEW ON 
 
 
in travel,/ 
Y 
in travel,L       I   - 
Iht         :BoNTON 
o travel 
PWARE 
            *WARREN 
 
 
IN Ii 
 
 
C 
 
 
VERNI 
ION) 
 
 
  0IG 1 CL-AY 
 
 
 
 
SULLVN* 
 
 
          PIKED 
  GIBSON b 
 
 
P IBURGJ RRC 
 
 
I 
 
 
I             / 
 
 
    LAPO;E  IS.OSEL     It 
        6/0 
 
 
      ,__I 
 
 
 
  PULASKI    *FLO 
 
 
     WHTE T-6SS " '- 
 
 
 
,,OAýOE'        I-    L _ 
                   ---I 
 
 
        I          I 
                    TIPTO 
 
    -               I- 
 
 
       SHENDRICKS    ~MARIONJ 
UTNAM 
       '                   4 
 
 
 
 
 
 
         j       OWN----.- 
 
 
       'LAWRENCE 1 JACKSON 
S'MAR7IN 
 
       S I        WASHINGTON 
 
 
       IIS 
       Z#Wf:O RD   HARRISOU[ 
 
 PERRYL. 
'ENCER 
 
 
         I.-.. .. - I 
X4A-R   F'- -7  URU SEs 
 
 
 
'SCIU   jOL 
 
HNI       N 
        '  !$tHITEWT 
    "--- i      r] 
 
 
        jILAKO~     V 
  GRANANDO 
  __AD N DELAWARET 
 
 
 
 
          tHENRY      . 
       I-          IWAYNE 
11iANCOCK 
 
    r~1-IFAYETTE- 
    SHELB 
                - FRANKLIN 
 
 
                ,,,JRIPLEY 
      ,             I 
 
      i-    I         /W,, 
 
 
  IS 
 
 
 
 
----I 
 
 
  --I 
 
 
 
 
OHION / 
  io 
 
 
 
  IeB6* 
 
 
SCO 
 
 
-",._G" i . 
 
 
 
           INDI 
 
 
K 
 
 
The Law Prohibits Copying or Reproduction by Any Process for PersonaIi use
o Remale. 
 
 
India 
 
 
T 
 
T 
 
A- 
Sl 
 
 
& 
 
 
PT.LS TBA3JLIJ1D 
 
sUaviy 
 
 
If 
[ANA 
 
Leopold 
 
 
June 15,1929 
 
 
w 
 
 
OOHIO 
 
 
3H 
D-'0 
ý 
10111 
 
 
kldo 
 
 
-       ) 
 
 
I                                            * 
 
  

					
				
				
 
ludln 
 
 
87'      lo& F..t of OOwNek   M 
 
 
Leciend 
 
X  eY l sr n   r 6 P nntl '" 
  -vem Pia       LAXE  PRE 
 
      Ihi 
    cou~~~t rc r)p~ 
 
 
  Hexpansa or cf, ; ,,A - - 
  I-6 71TPON 
 
 
 
 
 
       CLIANTLTN 
 
       4z~T 
 
 
S    -HENDRICKS MARI@ON 
   UTNA 
 
 
           -   JOHNSON 
      ILMORGANI 
   1~~              I 
 
 
   OWENN 
     SMONROE              A 
 
 
     'LAWRENCE JACKSON 
 --4         I.A.. 
 S MARTIN 
 
        WARANNTO 
I    i°'°   1 
 
 
 
       6AI"VWF  '  HARRISON. 
 
 
ENCER     L 
0A         ( 
 
 
87      Longut ,flas o t4fl87CA a' 
 
 
Is 
 
 
 
---'I 
 
 
 
.I-. 
 
 
  -plCLARK  - 
.-         ,  __,: P LIRI C'KIC1_S 
 
 
               GiM SURrLY 
                   of 
 
 
INDIANA 
 
 
June 15, 1929 
 
 
The Law Prohibits Copylng or Reproduction by Any Process for personAt Use
or Resale. 
 
 
8 
 
 
XWART           STLARAG 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   W rH-ITLEy ALLE 
 IW            I-H 
   I.,S O ' s t 
 
 
                    + 
A 
 
 
VION 
 
 
 
 
 
SU  IV 
 
 
IqztGREENiE 
  SI 
 
 
So 
 
 
I 
 
 
'ZD 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   I 
   A 
 
 
       "HUNTINGTON" 
 
 
 
 
 
   -I     *BLACKFORDI JAY 
   I             r 
 
   MADISON DELAWARE 
 
 
 
 
 
     I-        1WAYNE 
"F.ANCOC  J 
 
 
   1SHELY1   -FAYETTE 
 
 
            .4RANKLIN 
 
 
            AYRIPLEY 
    j    II 
  r-iFFRO I     WI,,_ 
 
  "* _ JEIPILY ' 
    SCOTT 
 
 
S| 
 
 
OHIO 
 
 
"lON 
 
--- 
 
 
 
 
2 
 
 
* $                            I 
 
 
I  P, V F /I 
 
 
I    1                          I 
 
  

					
				
				
lt&ýP :Bh3 
 
 
U. 
 
 
iaoGame Savey of Indian 
Ild~o le on-ol1d. june 15,1929 
 
 
cr/, ft bero 
-0toww   tc 
 
 
          PIY  0" 
0 bpo o4,  KNOX --/DAy 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     GIBSON  O 
 
 
>            0 N;-- 
  0 0-: NE]   WitRC 
  Q$       ,Q        o 
 
 
0 
 
 
2.0 
 
 
?cLUE          'PORTEF 
 
 
 
 
  0    -      JASPEP 
  5 ori0lt16Id, NEWTON 
  2 t h3 ht, brads 
 
         -    I   r 
 
           I      i 
        L        -_'. 
        :BENTON 
 
 
        .WARREN 
 
 
 q '8      t I44TAIN Ijj' 
   zoo 
 
 
 
       IVERMIiC 
       ION 
4'A.1welI- -   - 
 
     [ 0.C-. 
       :VIGO   i i 
 
 
 
 
       SULLIVANl 
 
         00 
     -   . 
 
 
     So      i 
 
 
The Law ProhibIts Copying or Reproduction by Any Proee" for personat
Use or ]Resale 
 
 
            x 
 
 
 
 
 .I. STARKEI 
       STARK 
I . T   !- 
:pi)/ '   Ii 
 
 
"I-, 
 
 
HART   jL"ENG  1 
 
 
 
 
 
  X    "DOLE 2T [WK ALLB 
    oo, I- . + iF _AL4 
 
 
 
    WABAS     0 
        HUNTIN T 
 
           00 
 
   .GRANT )O. 
         SI       I 
 
 
 
 
 
   MDISON  ODELAWARE O 
 
           0 
 I--.'-,i:Z- 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
      (9A 
    x~ L 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
        V          KL 
   ,    __ 0     , 0 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 1,S.COTTiý 
 !I -1-e IAif- 
 t   *,L_. 
 
 
_ECNO         HOWARD) 
      . CLINTON10.   - 
      w, *I      -TIPTON 
 00    °1o        I0 
 
 
 
 
      *      I, ,<® 
 
 
 
   ~x 
         x >>/xx) I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
               0 
    i,'i,--'_  ._\ --.c,- 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       'WASHINTON 
 
 
                 0 
   OG-! o     i  JOHNO 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   RO         w 
     McAWOND    HRi5o J 
RAT    -I-: ....", 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
        L 0     0 
ENE         0   0 
 
,, E ,y    0     0 
 
 
S 
 
z. 
 
 
Pla,-nt, fail 
Establ ishme 
Drift birds 
 
 
I N 
   4?4 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   - " O-.   iqtlq .e 
 
   I   i - st i. t tl 
 
 
ran, e 
Srange 
 
undary) 
ome not 
ed 
nt 
seen 
 
 
verifi ed 
 
 
) 
 
 
 
;F,. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I 
 
 
a    i      Indian 
 
 
/\ Non-breeding covey 
V   StraCling remnant 
 
 
S 
 
 
 
 
 
0 
--I 
ojd" 
 
 
fI toveisee ti 0,4 
  14" Aie di~ft. 
 
 
G,        -  Established 
              (accurate b 
          E stablished 
              (approx. bo 
  S0         Pl~nt. auito 
 
 
L  *  -1 
 
 
 . l_.           , 
 
 
S. 
 
 
m+                      &7-         lllttllll If+Ill  Umnm+m 
 
  

					
				
				
				
				
				
				
 
U- 
 
 
L 
 
 
£I 
 
 
Cro 
ove 
 
 
w 
r 
 
 
n 
e 
s. 
 
ni 
 
r7 
 
 
t~rt g-~O~VRI  EL 
         10M 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
           w IVI 
 
 
    PIKE 
0 160" 
WilSON 
 
      WARRICK 
 
 
. 
 
 
'OGANWHNS ON 
    i         i 
       .       I 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     ~ I  *  WA SHINGTON 
       MORANGEI 
   1..   -1       - Q I 
 
 
 
 
 
       I" ~HARRISON 
 
 
P ENC PER" 
 
 
   GORANT 
 
   I    N 
 gI 
    ISO  DELWAR 
  m-A -----.  7 
 
      ,   aiOOi r i 
   :----4 
 
 
      I-         jWAYNE 
JFAMcCK j 
     i         L  _ _ 
          ~LL- 
 
 
 
 
 
          '  - ' FRANKLIN 
    I    ECATUR 
L    [ 
    KOLOMEW1 
 
 
    I               I N ; 
    JENNINGS. 
 
    *         o-  61i- 
 
 
IND] 
 
 
Aild 
 
 
A 
H IO 
 
 
3 
 
 
 
] 
 
 
The LaW rV.l.bi. COpY-ng 01 Reprnmduftef  by Any Process for P [eminat Use
or Remale. 
 
 
Roosts of' 
1000 birds: 
 
infesta- 
f red     L 
and coy- 
 
 
ies report4 
:rey as well 
d foxes. L 
 
 
K wt t wJ FOUNTAIN 
~rt   1Ciw 
 
 
Indiana 
 
 
-i      i 
    T 69 
 
 
 
 
 
  HUNTINGTON [, 
 
 
X Xea 
   tio 
   fox 
   ote 
 r'Vou 
   ing 
 
 
IN       C 
 
 
PRDAlTORS 
SU~RV1Y 
f 
IANA 
 
 
15, 192c 
 
 
i 
 
 
I 
 
 
L     . 
 
 
 
DTOMER( 
 
 
t 
 
 
o. 
 
 
Mo 
 
 
|I 
 
 
JDIHIO 
 
 
I    |                        I 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
 
I 
 
 
F=- 
 
 
I 
 
 
-1 
 
 
F 
 
 
I 
 
 
S 
 
 
-- 
 
  

					
				
				
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lyt4 
 
 
-I 
 
 
-t C&AA, 
 
 
  Ze) 12-4       JASPE 
          *NEWTON 
          I       i 
SiI 
 
 
-o 4.   I AA  ENTON- 
 
 
0 
 
 
MARWA 
 
 
  SPULASKI     iFULTON 
 
 
     I- 
 
 
 
 
ECANOE            HOWARD 
        CLINTON 
 
 
    Frati                i oBOOIF HAI 
 
 
UNM- HENDRICKS    IMARION 
 
 
                JOHNSON 
 
 ORGA 
 
 
                FOUNTAIN 
 
 
 
          ,VERMI 
          ~ION 
 
 
 
 
               Cr. 
 
 
ST b~  1LLVAfi 
              cIoGREENE 
 
 
 
 
                     0 
 
 
            PIKE      jDt 
       N    11C. 
         rw   a 
 WARRICK 
       BURGo. 
 
 
JACK 
 
 
          ýWASHRINTON 
 
 
 
            HARRISO 
;AVWVORD'- 
     0Ai ll 
 _- 
 
 
PERRY L 
 
 
1 
 
 
 
 
 
           I 
HOLOMEW 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
         -I F 
   -W/O T'T 
 
 
a"               s"7     = 
 
 
SVCLARK 
 
 
     RAND M.NALLY 
LETTER SIZE OUTLINE MAP 
 
   INDIANA 
             SCALE 
Copyrioht by mana MmNuIly & coinpay, Chieago 
          MID& )1U IN . a. 
 
 
     0 
 
 
 
 ijMARTIN 
 
 
 
 
IS 
 
 
H 
 
 
Indian 
 
 
TSCIUSKO 
 
        .  . - .-I, 
 
 
 itARASHI, 
    N  I HUNTINGTONI 
    , II       1 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       Ki 
 
 
 
       IIWIN DEAAR 
       j i      E 
   " RANT°o  _ 
 
   Nltili . aiii 
 
 
      I s.,WAYNE 
 
 
I 
 
 
7 l~"( 
 
 
f; 
 
 
f 
 
 
.TVT-- 
   -.. 1 
 
 
o 
 
"1 
 
 
6XROE   [MV      BAI 
 
 
IFE 
 
 
:E C 
 
 
  I l 
I 
 
 
MS- 
 
 
fION 
 
 
!                                         ! 
 
 
I 
 
 
k 
 
  

					
				
				
ii4 7A t L unLt.d I~nl o f  a, C_  al l. 
 
 
ax 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Ct 
 
 
LVi 
 
 
 
 
 
-&4 
 
 
AA 
 
 
tre.too. L'  I 
         :BINTON 
         0.0_., . 1 
 
 
 
 
 
 
         I    FO U N T A IN   1 
            K0 
 
 
.V B0S t 0K 
   *   J 
 ION 
 
 -IGO 
 
 
 
SU.VAN 
  0* GfN 
 
 
     PIK 
 
 
  0 T0 
      PIK 
 
 
 
 
 
BURGO 
 
 
'2, 
 
 
Le 
 
 
 
ti 
 
 
-7- 
 
 
      *PORTEF 
gý .1 'E 
 
 
     JASPER 
.NEWTON 
 
 
"The Law prohibits Copying or Reproducties by Any Process for Personat
Use or Resnle. 
 
 
ACi4 
7 
 
 
          SEA~ 
 
 
 
        0 
 ..... .   I WWo y! 
 KLSI    0. F  -TON *1 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
      *           00 
 
      CLINTO- - ., -- 
      0         TIPTON 
 .1      -;--- 
 
              I. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     OJHENDR CKS  MAR1ON 
       ooI      o 
 
 
 
 
 
       ~0RGAN  0 JOHNSON 
 
 
 SROWN            IA 
    'LWEC     IJ   0SO 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
S'MARTIN  . 
I             II 
   S          1  0 
0    z-ziR o 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AEACEWj 
 
 
F 
 
 
F 
 
 
F9 
 
 
IHART  ...GRANG 
"s"o      "     I0 
 
   *   WItL.EY ! 
   I  i. * 
 
 
 
   - -.--iNT, 
 
 
 
           I      -4 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 _W SWI I        A,.N 
 
 
 
 
 I           _ 
   caI  FDLA   RANKOLI 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MlOLOMEW 
             RIPLEY 
    JENING I  L 
 1_--, iL&     o/ 
 
 
L 
 
 
Leopold 
15,1929 
 
 
 
ANA 
 
 
       o r * C 1. EI 
Copyright by ktand mQ1.I1y & Cou...P.3., chi-g.~ 
       XADK IN U. 8. A. 
 
 
A 
 
 
   I _ I 
0CLARK   - ldo 
 
j          I June 
  ;~i~ -I.GA:_Ll 
 
 
  'LOP'D4INDI 
 
 
I 
 
 
. ]                            t 
 
 
Li 
 
 
 
 
Is 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
0: 
 
 
 
WO 
- 
 
 
DHI4 
 
 
U 
 
 
I        T 
 
  

					
				
				
kdla. 
 
 
:BENTON New 
I Gbnciatedi 
WA   1 re   T 
 
 
    FOUNTAIN 
 
 
 
RM I KE_ 
 
 
SULLd;IV-- 
       IlI 
 
 
        _KNOi  DAV 
 
 
 
 
          PIKE   i 
  GIBSON jngi 
 
 
  P HDER WARRICK 
    -.ii, 
URG       --r 
 
 
     "       -ET 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
iFULTON 
 
 
Ii          I         . . 
 
 
(HART   1L4Iiau 
 
 
        NtOBLE     OAL 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    JAAH HUNTINOTOM, 
 
 
 
 
    :GRANT 
        I ,T-         -AYN 
 
 
 
 
 
 
        HRY      I 
 
 
 
                  'WAYNE 
  ._iHEAY        FODJAYET 
 
 
 
 
             ,       a, 
 
 
 
         DO fti;i 
    -P'  i 
 
 
WHITE    -Tciis 
 
     I      -Li 
 
     EH WARD 
 
        CLINTON 
 
Tj --I____          HAMILTO 
 
        ! Ti I I     Pie 
        I Ti*H 
 
-_ . -AHENDRICKS MA11ION 
   I,            I 
 
         MRGAN     JOHNSON 
 
 
 
    -  MOHRO    ROWN    NB 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ECER 
 
 
GALl 
 
 
  fiTD 
 
 
AldO L£eopold 
 
MAP A: TYiS OF 
 
 
--!, 
 
 
ION i 
 
 
-Ii 
 
 
 
 
2 
 
 
Ot!H1 
 
 
SURVEY 
Of 
 
 
June 15,1929 
 
 
GaL. GOUTRYI 
 
 
The Law prohibits copying or Reprodurtion by Any process for Persomat IVae
or Resale. 
 
 
ile     -, IIt  oyn rllpoulo k  ll  remfePlSnlP+~,o   eie 
 
 
SCTT 
 
4CLARK 
 
 
i 
P 
 
 
"41 
 
 
!                       ? 
 
  

					
				
				
Indiana 
 
 
1 
 
 
o. 
 
 
a 
 
 
      KNOXDA 
 
 
             F  F 
 
        PIKE   D 
 
GIBSON 
 
           WARRICIC' 
 
 
LANE    "WORE 
 
 
 
 
 
NEWTON 
 
 
   L~L L 
 
WARENTO 
 
 
 
 
     FOUNTAIN - 
 
'L           I 
 
 
-A,-- 
 
 
1.AIWIBA* WAI Al AAA 
 
 
L O;ýF  Ts  PH 
 
            (F~iL~r) 
            RKEi 
 
 
           WUTNTONI 
     i I I 
 
 
 ----"     - ,- ic''-, 
    S       FLACKFORI JAY 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
        *           1WAYNE 
        I-- 
.KAOCK      j     I 
     i   .L ..I..-, 
     -I" 
     *S~iLBY1FAYETTE 
 
            jF. 
         -DECAYTUR 
 iT oA 
 
            /1        ' 
   --d + 
 
 
      ~I~'N[MIAM 
 
 
          r     F 
    #,+   ,+++-I---+- 
 
 
 
ECA-EI           HOWARD 
 
        l,.,- ._TT__ ,i 
 
      S             HAMILTO 
 
 
 
 _. -HENDRICKS  MARlION 
 
 
 
 
      WEN          1JOHNSON 
 
 FF1 -               -i 
 
 
 
 
 
I *g ---i   WS, NGTON 
v7i 
 
 
 
     ,A i ~O 
   I  F Fi    F   -T" 
 
                  -I- 
L-- Et    I 
 
 
-I 
 
 
           bt. 
U.,pynght by IB.mI Mý 
         X AL RI 
 
 
I 
 
 
 
 
--A 
  '-i 
 
 
ON 
 
 
Fj 
 
 
1INALLY 
OUTLINE MAP 
 
ANA 
ALE, 
Nelly & ( .mpy. Chicag. 
N 11. S. A. 
 
 
A. 
 
 
I.he Law Prohibits Copylux or Repwrodutetou b  Any Prore*" Cor Werm..on
 UsI or Resnl%. 
 
 
I-, 
 
 
B 
 
 
I                                      t 
 
 
I                                               ! 
 
 
XHOART   LARAG      7S . ail 
    i-----lT.K--"9 
 
 
 
 
 
         *BT.LEY 
         '          i 
 
 
--                     i 
 
 
I " IVA 
 
ISULTIV j 
 
 
I 
 
 
m 
 
 
4  -k     'F FF 
I ______  _ _r_______ 
 
 
:_1HjO 
 
:3 
 
 
I           i       ..  .. 
 
 
L                   
 
 
I l      i                           * 
 
  

					
				
				
 
( 
 
 
Chart 
 
'S. 
 
 
6 ý 2 o 25 
 
 
                                                                        
                                .2 - . . C..   i 
 
 
 
 
1 2 . ....... _ _... .. ..... . . .. . ....... . . . .._..              
                      . ..._ 
 
 
 
  I ......._______ 
 
 
c ai / <ý tuffe a qrou.5e. 
 
 
Ra bbk17 
 
 
O JIv ~5eqsý,ot,5 E, .Iint( e~~ d a~-- 
 
      46                             75-9 
 
 
1905 
 
 
'7 
 
 
9 
 
 
/910 
 
 
£hecRerj cdoseQ' 
 
 
S/20 
 
 
'35 
  I 
 
 
- pr4r chck.4 
 
  

					
				
				
 
ladisa. 
 
 
*&hve 1# 
 
 
LE GEN 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   QI~ 
 0 D 
     -0 
     CC 
 
 
 
     A 
 
 
       KNOX 
 
 
       0 
 
       *PIKE 
  GIBSON              I 
 
 
          'WARRICK 
 > ADERt- 
Su-nm+    .I,,,,, 
 
 
           IA EE 
 
 
 
 
 
                JASPER 
           NEWTON- 
 
 
I/lse  veoI-. 
 
 
          I Ti 
 
          I-----.- 
 .cid--Ies :WARR 
 
STrhal     : 
 
2A             ýFOUNWTAIN L 
 
 
" PreIetve 
"   Wt heS VER- Ii- 
  :leo   cf ,J+ 
  • 				
     
     
     
    II 
     
     
    / 
     
     
    lloýD 
    LK 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
    Quail Census and Kill Data - Indiana 
     
     
    Observer 
     
     
    -    Place 
     
     
    County 
     
     
                             Population 
    :Acre-: Year-----------Kl 
    :age       : :Covies : Per:        :     Acres:         Acres: Per 
                           : covey :Bird~s  per : Kill: per :cent 
              *  99                99 bird         :      :bird 
     
     
    --------------------------------- - 9 - - - - 9 - -9 - -- - 9 - -- - 
     
     
    Frank N. Wallace 
    Albert Wallace Farm 
    Martinsville, Morgan Co. 
     
    D. A. Dunlevy 
    J. W. Russell Farm 
    Henryville, Clark Co. 
     
     
    John Greyereen 
    Training Grounds 
    Jefferson and Ripley 
    John Greyersen 
    Part of above 
    Jefferson and Ripley 
    John Greyersen 
    Part of above 
    Jefferson Co. 
     
    H. D. Newsome 
    Jesse Newsome Farm 
    Bartholomew Co. 
     
     
    Frank Gentry 
    1 sq. mi. NE of house 
    Brown Co. 
     
    Frank Gentry 
    1 sq. mi. SW of house 
    Brown Co. 
     
     
    Cos. 
     
     
    Cos. 
     
     
    (hills) 
     
     
    (bottoms) 
     
     
    John H. Gude 
    1 sq. mi. just W. Bruceville 
    Knox Co. 
     
    R. E. Llewellyn 
    Edgewood Grove 
    Vigo Co. 
    R. E. Llewellyn 
    Parke Co. 
    Fred 0. Dobelbower 
    Guy Van Metre Farm 
    Warren Co. (5 mi. NE Williamsport) 
     
     
    M. L. Neeley 
    J. P. Doty Farm 
    West Marion Co. 
    Wm. Wugeman 
    Outskirts of Ft. Wayne 
    Allen Co. 
    Dr. Geo. Hunt 
    N.E. Wayne Co. 
    John Goodrich 
    Suburbs of Winchester 
    Randolph Co. 
    George Cass 
    Suburbs of Nappanee 
    Elkhart Co. 
    Geo. W. Smith, Jr. 
    Farm near Kewanna 
    Fulton Co. 
     
    Don Wright and Ray Smith 
    Rennsalaeu Field Trials 
    Jasper Co. 
     
     
        : 40 :17 yrs:  2-3  :   15  :   40  : 1.0   : Never shot (many 
    :           :       :       :       :           :     foxes) 
    :(All orchard except 10 acres brush and 6 acres pasture.       25-30 usu-
    
                          ally survive winter.) 
    : 100   :5 yrs.:    4   :   15  :   60  : 1.6   :Not known. Hunted 
    S::some. 
    :(This is the "birdiest farm in this section.)       : 
     
    :6000   :1927:     80   :   12  :  960  :  6.2  :   ?  : 
    :(This is better than average ground for S. Indiana; 1927 a good year) 
       :640o :1927:    11   :   12  :  132  :  4.9  :   ? ? 
     
    :(This was the best section of the 6000 acres.) :           : 
     
        20:1927:        6   :   12:     72:0.3:         ?: 
    :(This was the best spot on the 6000 acres; shows influence of size 
                     of area  on census figures.) 
       :4.70 :1928:     5   :10-35:     60  : 7.8   : Not hunted    : 
     
    :(1927 same or a few more.  This is creek bottom and near average.) 
    :640    : 1928:    20   :   20 :1400:1.6:150 :            4.2  :   37 
    :(Never less than 100 birds killed on this seotion last four years) 
    :  640o :1928:     40   :   200: 00       0 : .S :200:3.2:         25 
    :(Never less than 150 birds killed on this section last four years) 
       640    1 :19281: 1   :   15  : 165:4.0             ? 
    *.:                 :      : ... 
    :(This section had 15 covies 1927, 6-7 in poorest years.       Is sample
    
                             of best ground.) 
    :100:1928:          5   :   15:     75:1.2:         ?  :(Hunted) 
    :(This is suburban real estate.  Is sample of heaviest stocking.) 
     
     
    200  : 192   : 
     
     
    599 
     
     
    12  :   60  : 3.3 
     
     
    ?7: 
     
     
    :(This is better than average for the county.) 
    :475    : 1920:     1   :    6:      6:     79:          : 
            :1928 :         :    ?:    174  : 2.7:      32:   15.01:    l 
    :(This is a very careful census, made on Jan. 9 after about 32 birds 
    :had been killed.  Owner conserves cover and winter feeds.       Many foxes;
    
    :no control, Sample of best ground.) 
     
    :200:1927:          3   :   15:     45:4.5:         ?: 
    :(Also 1 covey of Hungarians.      This is a sample of the best quail 
                            ground.) 
    :160    :192   :    5   :   15:     75:2.1:         ?: 
                  (This is a sample of the best ground.) 
     
    :640o     1928:         :   15:120:          5:     7: 
    :(This is a sample of the best ground in the county, along creek.) 
     
    :  640  :192   :    6   :   15:     90  :7.1:       ?: 
    *(This is a sample of the best ground in county.         Suburban real 
                                  estate 
    :5000   :1928:     20   :   15  :  300  :   16  :   ?   : 
    :(This is his training ground, was thoroughly worked.          Average or
    better) 
     
    :  600  :1928 :     6     15-50:   100  :  6.0  :   ?   : 
    :       :,22or:    10   :       :  150  : 4.0   :       : 
     
     
    : (This 
    : 740 
     
     
    :1923:           :       :       :       : 
    is his own farm.  Better than average ground for this region.) 
    :1928:       8   :   15  : 120   : 6.2   :   ?  : 
    (This is the best ground in the county.) 
     
     
    9 
     
     
    9 
     
     
    9              9        *       .                   - 
     
     
    * 
     
     
    ) 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    tudivAa 
     
     
    0e r-           t 
       , lo. nnt,,÷+d  ,.,  icur  \ 
     
     
    of pla-nt 
    own/ 
     
     
    :kts estorb- 
     
     
    V  5fI-aq un fenvc 
     
     
       (Drift hCk Tsnr 
     
       'Ara                     14, 1.,2ic 
    A+ Prphe r4qt5 QM:B-re. , 
        "qehe t?-stab. 
     
          * Conc ~r~tt   7 
     
     
    JsIhed rm o9e , 
     
     
     
     
     
    Ko  vbtoodj, 
     
     
                 0     CRLEEAY 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    5 6e  .... t WARIC 
       ,-,., . . .LiV,-A,- -. 
      >2              GREENE-7  - 
                0 1 ,0 
     
     
    -'I - i"a~u 
      0, es u 1 
      fno-- Kr 
     
      -- P1: -l -t 
     
     
    -               -TE CASS 
           2.            1 
           iALL 
     
     
           0 ,   I        _.. 
             CLTIPTON 
             , . 
     
      j--/)KC 
        TGOMEf}.'.  -  -  -  MLTOI 
     
     
     
    -      E MORICKS MARIO 
     
     
     
     
          roJOHNSON 
     
     
        Is, 
             ICRAFORO HARRISON, 
     
      UlcIWRtc~FR 
    ENE           m m y. 
     
     
    ?  i 7   r-,SW T -w-, sT, 
     
     -I 
        Lk....- , 
     
     
    LAPO E   .JOSEPII// 
     
     
     
       /TARKE 1 
     
     
          / /iq. EUEýI 
                   EE 
    )SCIVSKO 
     
              H]EY ALE 
     
     
     
     
       : -LA WAR 
                r "°°i,.7 
        jiG 
     
     
    7' 
     
     
    OH sIO - ldZr 
    RD ~>i 
     
     
    "G.MiVa SuarVEy 
         of 
     
     
    J ~  INDIANA. I 
                          .A~aioLeopo-A 
     
     
    Cock 
    19 2.I 
     
     
    ALldo Leopold    ,, 
    June 15,1929 
     
     
    The Law Prohibits Copybla or Reproduetiom by Any Process for Peronat Use
    or e.sale. 
     
     
    &IV I X~ 'X 
     
     
    e -e( 
    ,14 zte 
     
     
    Afeu,( 
     
     
    but 
     
     
    -7* 
     
     
    VA 
     
     
    I 
     
     
       . . . . ? ..  . 
    TOLCMIEW 
     
     
    I 
     
     
    o 
     
     
    I'r I       I               I 
     
     
    is.                     *I-      Lon , P.M , I--- d - -- 
     
     
    AS 
     
     
      7I 
     
     
    I 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    CLL4/V L1 t3AA.LO 
     
     
    -   
     
     
    gC 
    L U l~AL4,V 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    E: C CA, N.  " 
    * j:-,~.~M~AlLuh.TC . 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
      2qJJ 
     
     
    S&I . 
     
     
     
    Z.*    A2i*144A 
     
     
    R R   , 
      (,,I ee1A 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
      73/ tv 9ý 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    e v '7 , 
    1  '3 tv1  1j 
     
     
    1-1 wdw.UL 
    keb.. 
    Jvwi W 
     
     
       Ii 
     
     
     
     
    T& rnJL 
    (hAeL. 
     
     
    *1 
     
     
    t A, -0-   "41 t  UL 
     
     
    .4 
     
     
    G,   i 
     
     
    (.4 4,1 4f eL   Pa "' 
     
     
       Ck   4~ 
     
     
    '- ý ý ý'p ý ;4' 1.    ý 
     
     
    ~A4~LýIJ' 
     
     
     
     
     
     
    CA *.*v v- 
    C,~A I-, Jr 
    A"(" 
     
     
    ~*L4CL& I'll-,I 
     
    C4 Z' u  n 
     
     
     
    1ý 11  - ý- 
     
    ý4* J4 VA- Cý 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
    Iir                                 '61 A-AAL 
     
     
    C v tt 
    5'gA , 
     
     
    H   AIc.~£a 
     
     
     
         -t 
     
     
     
     
         IL AAA& 
     
     
      vsi! 
      Iu 
    I-U .IH,4 
     
    Li4 e..w 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    .     C.o4 
     
     
     
    a& o, 
     
     
    r  
     
     
     
     
      & 
     
     
          4-i-- 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
        'I    i 
     
     
     
    2 
     
     
         Qaj, Z.,L.A 
     
     
    11 Qo-ý-Wýv 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    mtzJ 
     
     
    /q8 
     
     
     
     
    iqi7 
     
     
    LLIIJ 1£J4 
     
     
    4'ILQ 
     
     
    VI S, . 
     
       ).b4A 
     
     
    I 
     
     
    19a.r- 19z8 
     
     
               *,4Y, 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    tiqazr- cz  r 0t4b 
     
     
    41V-ý 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
    tiKoKet M she.s 
     
     
    Foymcr 
    Old En 
     
    Old GrI 
    -Marsh 
    Old Be 
    P'1 o r  h 
     
     
    !&rd           -1   - 
    KEO                  DAY,ý NOX 
     
    *BURG 
     
     
     
     
       S/ VAN PIER- 
             I ,,  _ O"- 
     
     
              -ili 
     
     
           STARKE 
     
     
    _          II F T 
                  w 
     
     
    LAKE               PORTEF 
     
        ,,~ ~~9 Zsd I",z IQt 
     
     
    ~rLa Ke. 
     
     
     
       pheit~e. 
               :BEWTON14:1_ 
     
     
     
     
               :        ~TI 
    red        WRREN 
    ared~ 
    .Iub 
    "oclR breeci  -jr$ FOUTAIN 
          P1 :  ARE--L-- 
     
     
     
     
     
    .5 of iuse- ,o' 
    r         I r K 
     
     
     
    tjher   VIGO 
        2         I     Ft 
     
     
     
     
     
    rec aIE. 
    Ie efug, i 
     
     
    Plover1 
    im .sprir, 
     
     
    Leqe 
    * dxc, 
     
    Giuc 
    W  kO 
        o~re 
    X ru ff 
     
    0 t-ri 
     
     
    nund td1 i72( 
     
     
           i i 
     
      ,L~o         -~o , 
     
            WHITLEY  ALLEN 
     
     
     
            HUNTINGTON 
     
     
     
       .GRANT  iq  ! 
     
             .BLACKFORj JA7 
     
     
     
     
     
       I-     iWAYRI 
       I_           I--4 
     
     
                    -FAYETTE 
    .SHEL.Yl 
     
                     FRAKLIN 
     
    rHOLOMEW FJ,       ,---' 
                   VXRIPLEYJ 
     
    3 Killed J.ENNINGS  i  4 
    itfl 
     
     
      ;E--i ! 
     
     
         1          1 
           CLINTON     TIPTON 
     
     
     
     
     
     
    ii....~ _HENDRICKS  I MARION 
     
     
     
            MORGIIAN  jJOHNSON 
    ,i-E-m --:  53  pvrSq.m lj 
     
           I MONROE ;_jýOWN ,BA 
     
     
           be I - 
           LAWRENCELIQ 
     
     
         § , 
           iii-TildIqo( 
     
             '4&2es~ V )~,MOTOR 
         * ORANG 
     
     
             ICRAWFORD ARRISON~ 
     
     
    'ENCE 
     
     
    X,- ii 7lq 
     
      S10 zo0 
     
     
                INDI 
     
     
    IS 
     
     
      -i 
     
     
     
      ---I 
     
     
    N1   ' 'i.ve . Phea. 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    OHIO 
     
     
    f. 
    AVJ A 
     
     
    June 15,1929 
     
     
    The Law Prohibits Copylng or Reproduction by Any Process tor Peraonaf Use
    or Resale. 
     
     
    IndiasU 
     
     
       4I               [M-iAi 
    4 WT-E          Ii__ S 
              i      I 
     
     
          r-rEF ERSON f51IT 
    !    ,-r -y, 7"70 
    9       -0. 
      L , f- 
     
     
    _Dc 
    :rtL 
     
     
    Si 
    r( 
     
     
    e, 
    4 
     
     
    Wuhi 
     
     
    ji 
     
     
    )( dee 
     
     
     
     
    JNovey 
    ;\Oft e 
     
     
       "°It 
     
     
    E 
     
     
    I 
     
     
    I       -  ., 
     
     
    Z 
     
     
    I 
     
     
    [ 
     
     
    1ýý U'ý f 0-.i.h 
     
     
    1ý 
     
     
    f 
     
     
    41 
     
     
    I      I     ,I 
     
     
    I 
     
     
    I 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
    CHARTS.._: ORGRTIZTION .i~lD ACTIVITIJS OF FISH & GA  DIVISION 
                     (From 192S Report) 
     
     
    Gxaime Survey of Indiana 
     
     
    Aldo Leopold   6/15/29 
     
     
               CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES] 
                           I BY 
                 THE   PEOPLE Of  INDIANA 
                             I 
                      THE  GOVERNOR        PUB BLICATIONS 
                                          SCIENTIFIC  COOPERATION 
    IRULES AND REGULATIONSE                     TTHFDER GVT 
              ,<.,,SCI.CO        MISSOOPERATON WO THE FEDERS A GOVT 
                SCI¢EVTON OMISO            S cIENTIFIC RE SEARCH 
     
     
                                 M RI RAPURCHASE OF LA1EDS-HISTORIC PLACES-ETC.
    
             -NOCMIO AW5 ,& REGULATIONS i[A55ATT  IECTOR 
     
     
      ISRSOI 0IRRUSS  L   UAR A ONTE S  iUSRO £RPER----I D RII FR  E  C
     T ORIER RER  Co__ ro__  OIESOZIACEO'C--RTSINDO 
                GAME: PARDEN 5ADIRECTORINFORMATIOS   : ONR 
                LERKACCOUNTANT 
    r  EOLOGY TRRENTOMOI RRFORESTRYA I LANDS & WATUR FISH & AINEERIN
    
    STAT- RE OOI-r1ST  I  I PSTATESENITIRU0T R  ORESTER  IUPER NTENDENT  O  ITSUPERN
    ET O  STATE  MAKINEER 
    RIERAL RSOURR    PLANT" DI SEA CTECLARK CO.NTYR  TATRMRST  -  NAINYS
    HANKRS LINCOLNO 
          N ESUPOV CTIS  A SEO TAREEURSR       WAWABRALG NDST EE HATCHERE SUOVE
    £TIRE USTATRE 
       [' ~ ~  ~    LN ...OU° ....  < "°.........  FOR  MI C-1"'CI
     I CREEK C"'O"  RIVER5..............  CO........... oE.... 
                  STS D                                 Or Kw DRAOIAZE ;PROJET.
    
              L STOESUR PIARY       MU C K F TATE PARK 1. Pos R MAP MAKINO 
    FOEI           T L' --%--                                    . 
    Oro ORICRIROR EIRROGRROAMS To ERISORERrRouL ORcoUR FURNIRRRRUTREESTo CAIRRACSATC
     UC00AOAUKSAEPRKE5PNSPE.FROHESVý 
    GSCIý  RWELO   GR EEf ROE R1TE 111 WOKID LS OIIARET Of  L c r ALL
    S TATE PARRBOSS R55   RAF COERT  SUEROI   CONSTOO 
                                  RE"LHO UERELE EIITERISIRN WORN FAL 
                     TE S             RRI.OEO1OPLESI , & RESUE-SFP 1 
         IIO    AK - ET L                PA I 
                        COOPERA TIONT $PA1N WITK TER STATE PR R KIS  PRRRATION
     F WGAMEN 
     , 5 OFWATER   H nINSECT& TamE4-APNGOPRLAES 
     FOR I. &H....£...... .1IwS... P'A.ll  iR~~tOi'e~~-i ..."
    IN- .... ...... 5 ....... 
     Gý51EOPLOGALURE 10.3"  INUP ItE lWN 0 OF MR ,  ETK  I TKR Y
    A  A]SFI SISTATI  PRK  B o o CEN  AMEP  EO CRO-ELETO R  IC  UREn Y,' 
     
                                            II 
                       0                      Am!Iu.CE O A__ URVEO 
                           MARKETINGC OF TEMICER.tR  L  POTC ION 1r   'AM 
     
                                   111 I  11"-1 1" ll~~lLP~lT  I 1
    REID  - K O  FS 
                                         FA11LT / -, 
     
     
                       "Al A                   RESCUEP~fI OF" LKsH
    
                                                I"VS 
                          S!    .. .. .....TER S T TE D L Fo LE M r  - 
     
     
    ] 
    ] 
     
     
     
     
    ] 
     
     
    HUNTING AND FISHING LICENSES 
          ISSUED ANNUALLY' 
       UrlINC p(PA T" I V I I  " t.A  C , 
     
     
    I2AAAO 
     
     
    ARRESTc 
    AND COI 
     
     
    918 TO1928, INCL. 
     
     
    I 
     
     
    I                       mu- 
     
     
    H 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
                                     CI{&RT J 
                     Cane Survey Aldo Leo 1Id June 15,1029 
    W9iouh ~nn Tr'wYe nm'rnP~ti'p              11-i     rr 
     
     
    Ave rage 
     
     
    E! igh 
     
     
    Ind~iana -IO-l2 
     
     
    Observer     County   Evidence or Remarks 
     
     
    - -  --- 4 ---Wallace-- Hancock_ 
                                       (Ind.) 
     
     
    -.    . ...      . . .      Wallace -   x&ncock _ 
                                              ( Ind. ) 
     
     
          Supporting Lvidence: 
        190I-9 plants increased to full 
        stocking on Jas. B. Powers Farm 
    - (see census), falling off aain 
        around 1014. 
     
          Contrary Evidence: 
        Many plants disappeared, but 
        mostly on ground since proved 
        unsuitable. 
     
     
    _eýrly disappeared from Powers 
    Farm about 1914. (See census). 
    Date uncertain. 
     
     
    -- L 
     
     
    Previously thriving pl; nts disac.ý red in 1017 at 
    SVernon (Jenninffs Co. ) and Attica (Fountain Co. ). 
    Pidant at Seymour (Jacson Co. ) disappeared between 
    1915 and 1920. 
     
     
    - - - Parks - - 
     
     
                  St. Joseph Co. birds spread 
    Elkhart, -    715 mi. E to -Napanee region 
                  and hbave 'been thriving there 
                  ever since. 
     
     
          Supoort ing Evidence: 
          (a) Abundance: Bowman(Wells Co.) & Goodrich(Randolph Co.) 
                  say 1927 was the banner year. Wallace(Fancock Co.) 
                  says birds 1-c- to full abundance on Powers Fa~r. 
          (b) Spread: Decker(llski Co.) says Cass Co. birds spred 
                  12 mi. iW to Starr City; withorawn a ain by yQ2S. 
                  hitunt says first birds appered in 1 Union Co. 1929 
    ---    (c) Drift: Drift covies seen by Korsgard in Will Co.(Ill.) 
                  15 & 30 mi. S of home range near Theaton, 1'27. 
                  Parks(NToble Co.) saw drift covey at Wolf lake, 25 
                  mi. X. of Huntinr-ton Co. range, in 1;23. 
                  Drift birds seen at Rochester(1927?), Manitou 
                  La
    	
    				
     
    Al2 04MO&Al-A.U- A 
     
     
         -t 14                             u A  c i ~ ~ ~r7o) 
    CA~%41~to -       = 
       o --7 
                               4A. 
     
     
    I 
     
     
    ~~ I 01J U-00I All T4. 44i 
     
     
      - -- - - - 
                     I1 
     
    U 
     
     
     
                    I 
     
                    I 
     
     
    Cn                            C 
     
     
    Iqs5- - 
     
     
    1-- - . . . . - - -  - 
     
     
        7-j- 
    tv   : t 14-° 5 ," -  - 
     
    _ _.... 9 C41  J , , 
     
     
    I   " 
     
     
    0 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
    :C+RI: P+RTR3tJi.    Game Survey of Indiana 
    Aldo Leo ,old June 15,1929 
     
     
    '-a,. ect 
    C Ift mcc( 
    5Kev, ff5 
     
     
    C 
     
     
                  9 1--- 
    (.bSOS'45 KNOX 
     
     
     
     
     
          0 
        -/ISO    . 0 
               '(p 
        5j   _. ,-'  I 
     
     
       * K,> oo! 
     
    I       I 
    jWi_ ,       " 
    ?Z- 
     
     
    20 
                 LAKE 
    4t      o       j  .6 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
             0   - 
     
     
     
       0 , -   - ... !  i 
       I 'qL%   0 .-m.mr 
             L.o     . C 
     
     
    I%* Low 1,,*&do C.yug w 3m.w4u**M by Ay Pv  SW WIF.- I U.. W 1emeM. 
     
     
       "I I.-2 .. . -- 
     
     
     
         *       rW.L 02 LE 
    ?+,. I 1 e.l  r 
     
     
     
    1   Io       '   ' 
     
    ' - _,-4 ._ 0.., - 0  , 
        %- .oi", .  0 
     
     
        0 ; .. l ,   0 
        O. X O_ _ !  !  
     
     
     
     
     
          J       0 
    I    "  I      I L o 
     
     
     
    MU"-"  *  0 1 FA 
    I   e" l _- ,\ 
     
     
     
      So 
      i k++'
    	
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
       D40s    *-1vi1 
     - AWI.. -- - ..... , '- 
     
     _-_o    ii FU          i 
     
     
     
     N" I quaMs-lesI 
     
        ,I t 
     
           jt~ 
     
     q  u ill Preserve J~- - - 
     S    su,/-uIE i .i;- ,. . .- 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     o ... s were . ,                 o 
     I  PI°..IIt.coum 
     .Ob rver' , t " cou: .. \,, ] - .  _ 
     Se!es, iqzq( 
     CCC IVe-r Verjoo- 
     L O~rq~l P n ie 0, ,_- ', .... I- , --! 
     Qvfb s ... . I- L_       - 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
        Amct f bet-oc 
          SONDIANA 
        Cold Leopoappd 
      ?~Lr-- . ro  . 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Tt. L.. °P .
    	
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    L 
     
     
    0 
     
     
    s-ate - 
     
     
    r 
     
     
       ate.duced 
       h   .  I ,,    i-  
     
     -19a           T 
     
     
     
     
     
    rl5 Quai l-less : 
     
     
    )'eceflonp )wgifff~l 
    0IV       I 
     
    al T iuka I : 
     
     
     
     
     
     
    i IW Preserve 
     
     
     
     
    "oe oe es1 
    	
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
       1101II Octclan. 
     
     
     -Iqzs 
     
     
     
     
     
     iý quail-less 
    al Tr~iQ 
     
    11 Club   j~ 
     
    ;I Prteservej 
    htJlecSC5r WheM 
    6rft nr CooULtw 
    m-cordincotnp) 
    es 1q2,9        II       m 
    incaI Prairie :01 
    e~r very poop-) 
    cl of b~sr us-v~ 
    e r (appro 
     
     
               KNOX 
     
               0 
     
     
                 T. 
     
              VPN-I- 
       winJ~~~ 
     
     
    V1r 
     
     
     
          Si         i 
       il  STAK- i 
     
     
     
    I          '2      ' 
     
     
     
     
     
           icummu* 
             -....- 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
             0   i 
     
     S....  NoIM 
     
     
     
     
    G ot.IL 
     
     
       WABAS I 
          i-I      ' 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
          mUIMUSY 
    --I             -T 
    ""         '2. .   r 
     
     
     
    I---.-. 
     
     
     
     
        t'2I 
        '2         L. . 
        i    ACAT -   * 
     
      mou,-r !      / 
     
     
    MapL: QUkJIL & RAB3ITS 
     
     
     
    INDIANA 
     
     
    AJaO 15eo, 9oLd 
     
     
    Tk* Law r.~ts Cooh   w nopr awedoUe by An Prees aSim Pe~  S Vet 11.. Sr 31
    
     
     
    obeve fh1 
    rakbft h 
     
    LEGEFNE 
     
     
     
      C  QL 
     
     
    0 
     
     
    V - 
     
     
    7- 
     
     
     
    --I 
     
     
    ---I 
     
     
    2 
     
     
    Se 
    Cc 
     
    0. 
    101 
     
     
    K 
     
     
    - _W_ 
     
     
    3 OI 
     
     
    I('P)~ 
     
     
    I 
     
     
    A 
     
     
    L 
     
     
    9,W0,41 Nwfar..." 
     
     
    | 
     
     
    9 
     
     
    I 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                             I         I.FA 
                                     MMAI-- 
     
     
     
     
     
                          FIWT 
      rahl e up Ii    .   *h*hW       Ir 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    j NeX Qmil-less        '" - -N 
    L                         -Trick I 
     
     
    q" I I  'r~ e v            J ,  . 
      ro ntc .              I    I  L 
     
    0 - brvera f v cou V 1 III                 I 
     
      se  e,  "9&q    .--  ,SL. ._, - - -q , , I/ 
     
        t a Pro Iroet            ,. 
          Cc ~            0 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     Th Lw  .. -,a ._I.g. _3.e.ddSb7A?.._s   _. f  Jgl  Wa -UasS 
              ,/ =" _- t"h'!.   "INDIANA 
              l t = ]'-"   ,, ' --= :,' - Aldo Lreopold. 
                                  -Ttune 15.19,'9 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                       mom- 
                 li,'",_     _         "- -     I 
     
     
               ;I I !.. " ]   l  !*..1"'   - 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
      ll         J Ncc H quail-less -I--- 
      L            Tedra       I m . lTro 
     
     
    Q oi '. -      " .       I         W I 
       01qer~4co~1r~*          T~c J __- 
       0 0 rver.,5 1to c o u n - J U E LION 
       'Orq'onaI Prairie   T-i- 
       Cccve~rver$poop.) 
       'A c  f besir-r 
     
     
    I III,                        'I- .l ... ,I-m ! - " i1,, -- . . .  
    - 
              'lJ'  I "  'I  " "  ' .=.,  - f  ' T  i 
     
        "..    , ,  i  - 1I -0-i1F, - "'  
        -    I      'm     !        Ma L : qU I -- :--  I 
     i - "   I      . / l IatomJ       . 
             I~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~GM SURVEYhll, hl _! ' '-'I [ 
         z.;V                             of,. . co P !;II!I L -. - 
               -            ,,           ,_  . 
               ,?,:';?L o  ;   " ........  '!I N '  IA- . 
             .  o "' - i " ... . - i , --"-  ' 
             ' ~~~     ~   ~    ~  ~   Ad CLu,-ep,)i r I . -r ,i 
             /" ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -1n  15',19,""19--.- "
    !I {CII  .I ;/ Yv; = 
    2% _. l .o ,,w -  ,moyl .'- w,  .om wok  by A-""W  r  0/ . / E!
    rNIN CW 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
    hm 
     
     
           KNOX 
     
     
     
     
               I.R 
     
    OWs 
     
     
    ase. e'fwedue' 
    'on Oct-Aan, 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    v-or in mp win )) 
                      -Ti 
     
     
     Tri II 
     
     1 club 
     
     f Pr-eserveJ        L 
     fgSd where 
     -Ccord sncornpl) 
    wera to coun.tuojii 
    S,192,9 
    no/ Praii-eI 
    ~rvery poot.Y 0 
    of bgstr-  $5J 
    Sr (appro      Ig 
     
     
    /    I   I 
     
     
     
     
     
    -. ii- 
     
     
    ebeve "th, 
    Vr~hdS ha 
     
    LEGEND 
     
     
    T S 
      ' L 
      c i*N 
     
     
    %1 
     
     
             S 
      .J si*mcuI 
     
    Z7±nki        -f 
              I  
     I      C 
     
     
    iEifTh 
     
     
      I-71 
    + j+- 
     
     
     
       1IN    I   L ... 
    ! . . .-'-4 
     
       -.l j, i . 
     
       ~I / . 
         LA 
     
     
    Sp4I 
     
     
    N 
    I 
     
     
     
    --I 
     
     
    ---I 
     
     
    mu 
     
     
     
     
    MO.a 
     
     
    x 
     
     
    ago 
    ii 
     
     
    Map:: C UAIL & RABBITS 
     
         G.Ca SUMY 
     
     
    j  + INDIANA 
     
     
    lJdo Leopold 
    ,T'" 15.1929 
     
     
    -U. 
     
     
    Mw. law ?NmWt 0MyjM ii 3qg0*000 by A1W Vae "W P,,UswoUs We* of inh 
     
     
    R. 
     
     
       Mw.r-.    - 
     
     
               I- 
     
     
    S. ..-*1 °     i  
       "M~u 
     
     
     
     
                   _1 
     
     
    &++ 
    0 
     
     
    Os 
     
     
     
    Cc 
    o" 
     
     
    I 
     
     
         F 
     
     
     
    --r--  
     
     
    _ 
     
     
    I     w     I 
     
     
    C 
     
     
    % 
     
     
    lie II lel 
     
     
    i 
    i 
     
    i 
    i 
     
     
    .. 
     
     
    I 
     
     
    + 
     
     
    ....... . . . 
     
     
    L      "1 
     
     
    i*                           r 
     
     
    11 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
    0. 
     
     
    IThY 
     
     
           2.0 
           'V 
           lz8    ILMCE *ON 
    Clo.e1 at 
    Cffc. .t                               I 
     
     
    br~.oad$ K!OX 
    et',----------JO0 
     
     
     
     
     
            0 
         'USLM _ 
         -iy.O 
     
     
    ETGRI: P."TRL- . Game Survey of Indiana 
    Aldo Leo')iod J5une 15,1929 
     
     
    KmAV-, t 
     
     
           SA 
     
     
     
     
         ~7I ' .4*I 
    "'0 ° - -   JI_ . 
         L..L. , 
         Ion- 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
      "wel- _ o 
        0 
        0  41dTNI 
     
            *1V 
     
     
      I   STAJUCI o T 
     
      *      I    0 ' 
     
     
      01&  I ,< 1 
     
      ff °18-  I% 
     
     
            _A) 
     
     
     
             CUC 
     
     
        ONO 
    00 0 
    0o 0 I o 0 
          M0m;. 0 
     
     
     
     
            0  j 
        -   *.. .. * -J 
     
     
     
        D 
                0 
           S0' 
    / .'01 0 
     
     
     
         -   0 01 
     
                 0 ° .- 
     
     
    K 
     
     
          0 2R 
    o"- o 
     
     
     
     
     
     
    ,I°-           01 i 
          ~0 
        00 
     
              *0 
     
           0 O uui0II 
     . , _C . 10.. 0 
     
        _10 o _. ___.. 
            0        0~~ 
     II        0 
     
     _----I,-- . 
     
     0A ...  0 
     
     
     I \-.--,*   ,_= 
     
     11N.... 0 "= ' V,/ 
     
     AL. 
     
     
     
        S.~ I -...' /7 
     
          0. 
     
        I' V., 
     
     
    D 
     
     
    ed range 
    boundary) 
    aed range 
    boundary) 
    Ltcime nnt 
     
     
    * Plant, failed 
    SEstablishment 
    Z Drift birds seen 
    A  "Ton-breeding covey 
    v  Stra- ling remnant 
     
     
    ZII71 
     
     
           I wy see  ft. 
     
     
    7 X 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    ,-'j 
     
     
     
    x!4 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
       iX @ I0-iqLb 
     
     
     X* 
     r 
     
     
    I 
     
     
    a 
     
     
    T". Law FPyMIts C00"10 0 Atp.e.4etwe by Any IPaw.e few .e"NOINN119
       .w w tealI. 
     
     
    verif ied 
     
     
                  IL~GLI 
    S00        E-stablish 
    )2         (accurate 
           E,-- Istablish 
               (approx. 
            0  Plant. ou 
     
     
    )         0 
     
     
    i 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
    TC-.tMA P."RTR-I .  Game Survey of Indiana 
    Uldo Leo sold June 15,1929 
     
     
    -lov:Ii7A 
     
     
    SPf '0  Ce 
     
     
                   LC 
    "1 4 well-- 
          i ''i ---L 
          , VIGO  I 
     
     
     
     
          5" -I0 
     
     
               4 
    N'obrood's  KNOX 
     
     
    seen ------- -11 
                0 
     
            0 ..0B 
     
              0 
        GiBO - - 0 
        "0o/'b~ __ __ 
    ~11 1_o o '' 
      aL-o 
     
     
            l   x 
     
     
     
     
          TARKEI 
        I          -1 
     
     
     
     
    I          0 I 0<< 
     
     
    I*: fo t. 
       2.0 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
           z !o 
     ",... i  ! 
     
        IQAIN 
           L.L- . *, 
           _.ow-  @ 
     
     
           I  0 
    T O0. O !!i 
     
      0 
     
     
     
     
         *-  0  WJ9UC 
     
    41I *.j     0 
      ":"        *0. 
      ---  *~I-- 
     
     
    m--2o o 
     
     
     
     
       0              *" 
            L0 0 
     
        030 
     
     
       iw- __ .. . -i-J 
     
     
     
     
     
     
       iI~,0 
     
       K0  ! 41D 
       jo-_ 
     
       0 0 10  ,X( 
    x   x 
    _6    Q .-:U  f jH iAW  A o t'x  
      -0-0 
     
    o  o  
     
     
     
                I 0 
     
       .u     ,- . N r 
    ..,* -" - --,0 
     
     
      01 0 
    S    e.I .- ..It 
     
     
    K00         Zstablii 
       )2 (accural 
                Capprox. 
              0 Pcrctt 
     
     
    V 
     
     
    03 
     
     
    r 
     
     
    range 
    'oundary) 
    rance 
    undary) 
     
     
    verified 
     
     
    I4 
     
     
    shed 
    te 'b 
    shed 
    bo 
    oult c 
     
     
    Plant, failed 
    Lstabl ishment 
    Drift birds seen 
    "Non-breeding covey 
    StraCý1ing renmant 
     
     
    c-u.00. 
     
     
     
     
    /  I    ',X)X, I 
    Ol     O     I  cO 
     
     
    Vie Law ?wIlbts CepyllM W 3.g..fdualIM I Any Fmm ftr FSOMatM WI. or Ulsel
    
     
     
    I 
     
     
    i 
     
     
    -'i 
      i, 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
      o j 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
      .'_ EI O -  l',% I 
      IDOeAG a btge n ot~ 
     
      0 ~ o qL 
     
     
     
     
     
      0 ~ O*I~ 
     
     
    p      t. . irw W " . I Ir # _ ; :: w o I r 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
    i.J±do Leo ,old J-une1 
     
     
    4JLtLYC( jL 
     
     
           Ag,       naana. 
    5, 19q2 
     
     
                      JUICEjeef  LAKE 
    Kp v, te/I'c,; ell 
     
     
             0 
          ""lI.h~rd  I 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
              q8 0 
                  F . l 
              o, 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                @@    j  0 
                   AIq- 
     
     
     
                 0    0. 
     
        0C 0 
                  0 
                  "t 
     
    * "j7"O 
           'CL- 
     
               C 
         C~     ..7 
     
     
    U. 
     
     
           °0 o 0- 
           0i  0 
     
     
     
           C o 4  0 
     
     
     "-o  I'.Id',-- 
     --- 
    ,00o;-": "" ,   0 . 
                I    o 
     
     
            0 
     
    <1j ooO 
     
     
     
       0           o° 
     
     
    XCA 
     
        - wrx 
     
     
    j,0 
     
     
     
     
    !  o __ 
    J2X Di    0 
     
     
     
            0 
     
     
     
     ]   ),     ' JA 
         l').' C 
     
     
     
     
     
     
              IL - 
     UUA 1 >   0     C) J 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
         , r---p.. 9 
         ee-l 
         '   -TU 'r-, 
     
     
    |- Me .oft ,se 
     
     
    0 
    0 
     
     
    :x 
     
     
     
     
       ' ( 
     
       "INN . "t.M - 
    ) I tlNIIN 
     
     
    r 
     
     
    0           Istablished 
    y 2         (Accurate b 
             ,-- -stablishned 
                (approx. bo 
            0   Plnnt, outc 
     
     
    V 
     
     
           qeeJ 
    -4% 
          'kc4 
     
     
    I range 
    oundary) 
    rane 
    undary) 
    o.-ie not 
     
     
    Plant, failed 
    istabl ishment 
    Drift birds seen 
    "lhn-bree ding covey 
    Stra&- ling remnnnt 
     
     
    verified 
     
     
    Iha 
     
     
    TA. LO" PffIbWIt. C0110111 ". UOPRO1duetk.M by Any Fwaqaaa fag
    ?.yoaaa V,,,, w REase 
     
     
    ! 
    I 
    I 
     
     
    )( 01 
     
     
    :-,-I.             Panil/ýL 
       -9-: .17T 
     
     
    L 
     
     
    Slaw IPeolmlMta CoTlnqlr ear itelPemlmetlom I, Am I   le e 
     
     
    top- 
     
     
    I 
     
      
    
    				
          
          
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Only 2, 1936 
     
     
    Ur. ft Yarnel 
     
     
     
     
             This to awver belated &dm~odpet of your 
     
    letter of War 20.    1 amafad  m e aud *a=% 
     
     
       nevrtelssfor you Iteret.Ot 
     
     
     
     
     
     
                                  Aldo 14pold 
                            Pimf..gow ot Game  in 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
                              Cpper Lfmer 
                                       Published by Arthur Capper 
    RAY YARNELL 
       EDITOR 
                                                                    TOPEKA, KANSAS
    
     
                                                                    May 20, 1936
    
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                       Professor Aldo Leopold, Director 
                       Wisconsin Game Department 
                       University of Wisconsin 
                       Madison, Wisconsin 
     
                       Dear Professor Leopolds 
     
                            In the spring of 1934 I had some correspondence 
                       with you in regard to your efforts in behalf of game 
                       conservation and the management of wild life in a way
    
                       which would result in benefit to the farmer. 
     
                            If you have continued the work since that time 
                       it would seem to me that you possibly have gathered 
                       together information which you could put into an 
                       article on this subject of vary material interest to 
                       farmers. 
     
                            It would be particularly interesting to us if in
    
                       such an article you could present the experience of an
    
                       actual farmer or several farmers, who have put some of
    
                       the ideas you recommend into practice on their farms.
    
     
                            I would be pleased to have you prepare an article
    
                       of 1,000 to 1,500 words and supply five or six good 
                       photographs that would help get your idea across, and
    
                       submit them to me in the near future. Of course we 
                       will pay our regular rates for the story and for the 
                       pictures. 
                            I will appreciate it if you will let me have your
    
                       reaction to this suggestion in the near future. 
                                                 Vir ivulv vnii 
     
     
    Sditori 
     
     
    zwxýy V"e    0 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Now Soils Building 
    may 10, 193~4 
     
     
    Mr. Ray Yarnell, Mitor 
    Cpper's Famer 
    Topeka, Kanseas 
     
    Dear Mr. Yarnell: 
     
     
              I have not overlooked your reest 
    for a article on using contracted lans for 
    and cover. 
     
     
    of March 31 
    gae food 
     
     
              Aftr repeated atte ts I ws unable t gt a 
    clear auhorization fromi the AAA to Plant sor&, af fir, 
    meet cr, or other plants whic w      d stand up urin 
    snow. Thley did authoriue the planting of back~meat, cow 
    peas, mjian, and other plants which are good food in fall 
    but of not mich value during winter. 
     
              The attaced mimeograph wa issued to county 
    agents in Wisconsin. It was so far from satisatory, 
    however, that I (lid not think the whole subject merited 
    an article. If the plan contiues for anothr year I hop* 
    for better luck. This is simply an explanation of why I 
    did not counicate with you frther. 
     
                              Yours sincerely, 
     
     
     
     
     
                                       ALDO LEOPOLD 
                                  In Charge. Gus Research 
    AL/VitS 
    Encl, 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                                              New Soils B.lg. 
                                              April 2, 1934 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Mr. RayYarnell   Witor 
    Caper,~ws Fame 
    Top", Kansa 
     
    Dear Mr. Tarn.llt 
     
              To write the articel you reasd     r should 
    first have definite withorit from. the AL for faiurs 
    to dvote cont   ctd a       to g    food patc.es 
     
              Prof. 11. W1. Clark is askn for such mthor- 
    Ity. Attachedt is a pule~blicoity al.et we hope to 
    use. As soon as I he.ar from th  AA I will      up 
    something for you* 
     
     
                               Yours oneiorely,, 
     
     
     
     
     
                                     ýALDO ILMO*QLD 
                               In Charge Game Research 
     
     
    AX/*U 
    Encl.ol 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
                              Cdppe drer 
                                      P,blshe by Arthur Cpe 
    RAY YARNEILLd. 
       EDITOR 
                                        Plarch 21, 1934          TOPEKA, KANSAS
    
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
               Professor ddo Leopold 
               Director 11isconsin Game Department 
               University of 'Jisconsin 
               Madison, Vvfisconsin 
     
               Dear Professor Leopold: 
     
               In a recent release I notice that you are promoting the idea 
               of putting "    q    acreage, withdrawin under the various
    crop 
               control plans, into food and cover crops for wild game, native
    
               to the locality. 
     
               I am interested along this line and I wonder if you could 
               develop an article for us running from one to two thousand 
               words in length, which vould set forth your idea and shov7ing
    
               how it is being put into effect. I think the article should 
               tell in some detail just what the farmer can do and how he can
    
               do it. This should apply not only to 7'fisconsin but to the 
               entire middle west if you have the information to cover so 
               extensive a territory. To go along vith it I should like to 
               have some illustrations which mill help tell the story. 
     
               I also should like to have the article at the earliest possible
    
               date as it seems to me this would be an excellent time to 
               publish such an article. 
                                          Very truly     s 
     
     
                                          Edit  , Cap e _ Farmer 
     
     
    Ray Yarnell 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    STATE OF KANSAS 
     
     
    GoV. HARRY H. WOODRING, CHAIRMAN 
    FRANK L. PINET. TOPEKA 
    J. H. LEE. WICHITA 
    T. M. NORTHUP. QUINTER 
     
     
    FORESTRY, FISH AND GAME COMMISSION 
      ALVA CLAPP, SECRETARY AND STATE FISH AND GAME WARDEN 
                   PRATT, KANSAS 
     
     
     
     
                   September 23, 1931. 
     
     
     
     
     
     
        Game Survey, 
        404 University Avenue, 
        Madison, Wisconsin. 
     
        Dear Mr. Leopold: 
     
                  There are bobwhite quail in every western 
        border county of Kansas at present. Do not know 
        how far west they originally extended. In the south- 
        west border counties, a good many of the small blue 
        quail are present. 
     
                 I have seen fine coveys of bobwhite in 
        central Idaho at an elevation of 5000 feet. 
     
     
                                 Sincerely yours, 
     
     
     
                              Fate4ihand Gamem     an 
     
     
    AC/FH 
     
     
    ýý  110 
     
     
    0 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
                     CHART   O    Gb. 
     
    nuLUCIATION IN RMUATIOI7 TO RAWI BMM~LAR 
     
     
       rireient range boundary 
    - Original range boundary 
        Territory believed to exibit 
            the saturation point 
    0   Territory exhibiting irruptions 
    o   Sporadic invasions of new territory 
     
     
    and central 
     
     
    w Present range boundary 
    Orig  rl ange boundary 
    Present range 
    AG"ired range 
    STerritory known to exibit 
        fluctuation 
     
     
     
     
    rth Central States, showing 
    pheral fluctuations 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
    FORM 12207 
     
     
     
                   ESTABUSHED 1802 
     
     E.I.Ou PONT De NEMOURS & COMPANY 
                   INCORPORATC O 
               CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT               June  4th, 1931 
             WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 
     
     GAME RESEARCH DIVISION 
        HENRY P. DAVIS 
      1735 CARRUTHERS AVE 
        MEMPHIS, TENN. 
     
     
            Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
            404 University, 
            National Banik Bldg., 
            Madison, Wis., 
     
            Dear Aldo: 
     
                       Thanks for your letter of May 25th but please do 
            not become too enthusiastic over the Kansas Prairie Chicken 
            Investigation status until it has reached a more mature stage. 
            I certainly appreciate your offer of assistance and will un- 
            doubledly call on you when the time comes, in fact you are 
            one of my main selling points. 
     
                        In reference to the change in your views as to the 
            practicability of managing cyclic birds, I am wondering if you 
            have as yet put your thoughts in writing. If so, a copy would 
            be appreciated. 
     
                         I am not thoroughly in accord with your remark 
            concerning our being able to duplicate the efforts of the Scotch.
    
            For years they have been engaged in the manufacture of most 
            delightful and refreshing beverages, the quality of which we 
            have never been able to equal. 
     
                          With kindest regards, I am 
     
                                                    Yours very t~j 
     
     
    GAME BREEDING INFORMATION MAY BE SECURED FROM OUR GAME RESEARCH DIVISION
    
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    Form 1901"* 5M 12- 
     
     
    E. 1. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & COMPANY 
          WILMINGTON. DELAWARE 
    SMOKELESS POwDER DEPARTMHNTr 
     
     
    ry 1,1 1 
     
     
    To: J1Q3, I,  
     
     
       of t  uii th  ~ L ln, tWtL 
     
     
    strq~   Aort 8hou1! be i,8oe 
     
     
    otor o CoreAYtiO11. 
     
     
    hio, o ~f'o ait    ii of tfe 
     
     
    irt th ts% . 
     
     
              on,. i Il z1  t  fair  rtt oD  i e   i 
     
     
     
    
    	
    				
    Form 19017* 6M 12-30 
     
     
    E. 1. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & COMPANY 
                INCORPORATED 
           WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 
    SMOKELESS POWDER DEPARTMENT 
     
     
     
     
     
                           '-                         ,  ' 
     
     
       21 ..... .i oY . . ... o . - h e ever y ~ in,. 
       7n                                  ri   d 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    -                                             Ilhil 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    35, 1931 
     
     
    ýlr. "Ienr P.-y vi 
    1735 
    7!is, Te~see 
     
    Dear" ie~ 
     
     
    .r'? ts £r Y, your ef rts t,3   c tn nh the ý7      pr-ire 
    chicen ivestVatio. To stir up th.t t        inte  t in thse 
     
     
         Thnever this t!lv rea7   s the proper sLt-, o hve nly 
    to cl on e for s  hi1 i I  be oble tý give. It ocmrs 
    t) ime that _ neve  thea flnýmctA1 v-et-i  rad    n rral 
    s1rne you and I ml,-ht !n out teeta-rtheiran.rt'on 
    to n with us if at -Il 7ossible, 
     
          ~iooonIn  s nlot un'ii- theilr p-ýrairiecc1n inctmt.z 
    very hard, n.- I r4 In Mwp)ei tt 1ýmsns con r e012  the lead in this
    
    Important otlvity. -  o- viens as, to the nractloabl ity of .nn- 
    ni1.' cyclic bIrds h ve ier-ea c       te :,e in the 1at y'. 
    ie otch ar absolutely icevf    rerless of th~e cycles, i( 
    he                                  oaf thehe ~ ti 
     
         71t best regards 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                           In ire Oe~~ 
     
     
    Co,,Ths to Uessrs.  ale 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
    FORM 22287 
     
     
     
                   ESTABLISHED 1802 
     
     E.I.DU PONT DE NEMOURS & COMPANY 
                   I NCORPORlATIC 
               CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT 
             WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 
     
     
     GAME RESEARCH DIVISION                         NOV.  6, 1930. 
        HENRY P. DAVIS 
      1735 CARRUTHERS AVE 
        MEMPHIS, TENN. 
     
     
     
     
     
             Hr. Aldo Leopold, 
             Chemistry Bldg., 
             Madison, Wis, 
     
             My dear Aldo:- 
     
                    Enclosed please find copies of two letters to Maj. 
             Watter, which are self-explanatory. 
     
                    I would appreciate it if you will write irme.ic tely 
             to Alva Clapp, state game warden, Pratt, Kan., outlining 
             what you think could be accomplished by a prairie chicken 
             investigation, what other research projects are doing, and 
             giving him complete data concerning such a project. Also 
             please tell him whether or not the Institute is i4 position 
             to contribute to such work. Clapp will make a big effort 
             to sell the idea to his commissioners, and wants a written 
               proppectus to lay before them. Thpy meet Nov. 21. 
     
                   W1hen you make your survey of Kansas, I wou]l1 suggest 
              that you see George A. Clark, Topeka, and Tom A. M-cNeal, 
              editor Kansas Farmer, ICail and Breeze, Topkka, two old- 
              timers who can probably give you a lot of information. I 
              can give you other contacts when you are ready. 
     
                    Uill see you at the Game Con:-erence. 
     
                                                   rely 
     
     
                                                             'sVI.7 
     
     
    GAME BREEDING INFORMATION MAY BE SECURED FROM OUR GAME RESEARCH DIVISION
    
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Tov 6, TO 
     
     
    Frrom Henwy P. Thvis. 
    SubJeott STATUS XAIIAS   hAIEt ICV    UTVE IG~ATIOl OJ OT. 
     
         X have now L'otten the forCes neeeiý:- for the :4a'- 
    lislhent of a ranirie hiken iveti -ton In s  wok 
    ing to-cther ,a have       sei eulfelent interest, I believe, 
    to ezry the projoet thr       to a euenesfnl    grntio. 
         The ramehos nar Yrtes Center, Kr. , over -hose grounds 
    the 1i4-Ceont1Anent prairie ehioie-en fierr tn sre - eah 
    yetr, awe intensely interestedI in seourin the pan      have 
         offor(I -'h(Ar  operntioni !umnd the Use o-1 this7 frea, 
    tihih iv probablaty the best in the state for this pnrpoae. 
         Aimr Cla-pp  state r-  a:,rdae "IrrAt, _--n., has ra-eed 
    top!,ee the natter befor his boar4 of oo -im- loners at 
    the  ne-t meeting late thls -o-th. e wil1 reeo , end its 
    fta,-otio  and believes that they  i1l aeopt it. 1{evs     he 
    s   te  ate he is Ulte eonfi0S n0 nt %ht he e(Olu( seeure its 
    nior-         if the IV stitute x- ou1 .aree to eontr ibte 
    $*,000 or even $C per yw to the three ye, ,ro~ee, I 
    an senpino a. o    of hLis letter to L'OrOl, aOoin1 hin to 
    'write Cla at ones, 4utliIn    , the variois research ;-oJeets 
    wier     over the eowitry expaiInMg the "' a, its 
    benefits, eto.9lapp has asked for this In order to have the 
    pl  i ri  tlng for nresentation to his bo.rd, 
        Dr, R. . Nor    hed of the d artnent of roolo _, 
        KassAre  1tua Cb 0~ 0 --0 7htta-no TKe-. I -s enM-Vmu 
     to see sucha p     eeroet rta-e ,-e.  rha llit eA to piok for 
     flnal soleoCI n several possible feVCws for tbis Zorw.. 
     Ho hasI iid noiw two yoV,     instr -te- five or six 
     raauate ascict-nts in the zooloe-il p~rtnant and be. 
     ives that out of this   hohe e f ifi a m--n o w- ul 
     p)rove sati--fre-,tory.Dw, NaTrbm'!rs  ill met as puperisior. 
           LE CI, dirf.ietor of the elpeinent statii, at 
    the eollegze, ie also iuite interested and Al' lend his 
    eoooperation. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
       Several years ago a Dr. Jewell- wiýhth the eoolegr, Con- 
    'uCte. a fish incutiation for thK     Gre a      h 
    Do-prtnent This projeot idi not result uatiwfeetorIy 
    b:ýt frienlI roeV ýinship bete n the Co loge ad the 
    department wore -aInti-ned, 
         Clapp sta'te  that s e-tatl bioken a  soatter 
    tArly well All over the stet, even in the easter. ipwtion. 
    In eome seotions they re shouLn, a 11ittle ineorese, 
         Dua~'ngý theQ pavt  everal yee-rs, the da~tethas nr-ot- 
    ially conontr     Is effrtws on the estr~lishant of a 
    series of paxls end at:te les, eped  Tng   ch more in tis 
          tio t   for fish         In gems Z 19 5,00 1uail were 
    roleased; In 19)9 3,000 more were im     edi a  rleaoeo, 
         1lopp believes tht the riLnec pheasnt wi- thrive 
    Suffcintly in Xn     to mae     Vluable eontribIition 
    to the, hun-izteorc b -,ý  He carsr they ar  dciý   we'll.
    in 
    Co~uxty, Tlre thý oand Pheasm-nt were  la   ged unrng 19A 
    and   700   1930i . 26.0000 eG  ere d"Itributed l.est Yer 
     
        Thm-.ýarins dI not seem to do well In K"anes.  ne 
    hIunred rn(! three pair were imported1 nd rel coc  in varo 
    seetions with preotierlly no re ults.       weani wre 
      nae in Boiir-,bon comntj (easte-rn pe.rt of tlet e); ItlIsr 
    county, the Flint hills section, on an 108,000  ore. ranoh; 
    FtI.,es Actiu!tI     xerirent   t1 t  an in the northwest- 
    em sectlon of the state -l v-tion          !7#00ieay ,0 feet, 
    hatched onoe then dlsapreawed llfeee 'od 
    Protectionsi the sand' hi' Is am'! sa-,  braish action. no 
    results. 
         The pollitic I  lt1ation In Keneas myi  feet our 
    chicken Inveetijation plans. The  ibmatorinl ree has 
    re ilted in prýatieall-ca   h ed hie , with the absentee 
    ballots robably the deccing faetor and yet to be nointel. 
    They -ill not be ount :T before neot ýwek nd the re-ults 
    "Aill not b eerti'.'ied l De- I. A eent  ill. 
          be  or~ndo. ~ariqe wesT   A reountviil robbl 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
        Unofficial re   to 4ete give Iawr- Weooo11ig (Dm.) 
    P 1eS of onlj26 votes over Fri *        (Iem.) If 7uoke 
    ia electeds CVpp will in all Prob-iiity remin    a    , B, 
    iozl~lc~y of To  ,, V!  ri~      ft 0 h' V i~ oninen% 17o Id 
    trial a,'a, will prably b epn  to  t the tome 1 
    fish    Iiision,  In the event that Goiirloy 3oea not eare 
    to 5accepthe pz1opor mDn 11l be 1o pointe4, as Gourley 
    and R. . Uell of Topekat bIoh close Triends Of sine are 
    lpolti*seally and they'rr both int0enely int--e-tee 
    in thVic  ka inVesi#, in          1. .' rthri-a 
    's opa, tnd w!11 h71   e mch t0 sto conceri 
    ppointments p Ovidedl O eOse, n   co0es Throuh At 
    present the  rmsThes %6he L0oeOt ohairran of the Grre, 
    Forery   -td 1,sh Commision. Efiort are beinA  nv b 
    tuheý 1# *%A* of '"pmsto tn:ýce thaeatmn        u of pol
    
    itico mn. cons ifermbl- publlcity is  eing  iven the   . 
          C I will pro.bby b.e t %he Gine Co  renoe 
    Lopol.d an I oan go ito the matter more ully with hi 
    there. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    lo-,ie to Alesr.  is1 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                       Ollix 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
      ~Ltt~fl 
     
     
     
     
             )f                                        'ilk~~o~i6 ~oVetV  ~ 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                             *0~~~ ~~ f~ ~t*tI 
     
     
     
     
     its !'I  'if  A~ cor , itI   - I  av 
     
     
     
     
    lie~s a  v*l aottz~n~  W  ii  ~$n ~ I 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    ES"ITNUSNEO 15 
     
     
    E.:I. DU PONT DC NEMOURS COMPANY 
                 INtOR RORATED 
          SMOKELESS POWDER DEPARTMENT              December 19, 1929. 
            WILMINGTON. DELAWARE 
     
     
     
          Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
          421 Chemistry Bldg., 
          University of Wisconsin, 
          Madison, Wis. 
          My dear Leopold: 
                           Just returned from a very interesting 
          and instructive shootin7 trip in the Mississipni Valley 
          with Nash Buckingham and in which Mr. duPont and Mr. Dodge 
          accompanied us, to find your letter of December 10th asking 
          for the acreage of the Saline Game Preserve. 
     
                           You will find this notation on the bottom 
       II of the sheet covering years 1924, 1925 and 1926, a total 
          acreage of about 20,000; approximately 1,100 devoted to the 
          Club and 18,600 under shooting lease. 
     
                              Most sincerely yours, 
     
     
    L.W.T.WALLER,JR.--ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 
     
     
    r**R 1"M L 
     
     
    w!P 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
    File Kansas 
     
     
    Extract from a letter from Major Waller, October 7, 1929 
     
     
     
     
     
     
               I am in receipt of two letters from Henry Davis 
    dated October 1st, in one of which he goes into some length 
    in explaining the field trial grounds at Yates Center, Kansas; 
    this iu the Mid-Continental Field Trial Association. 
     
              Davis states that he was present at a running on 
    these grounds on chickens, and that points on quail were dis- 
    regarded. I will quote one paragraph from this letter which 
    seems to be extremely interesting. "While the trials were run 
    on chickens and but little valpe attached to a point on quail, 
    it was a revelation to me to see a number of covies of quail 
    ranging along side of covies of chicken and while none were 
    flushed at the same time, several covies of each were found not 
    over 200 yards apart and on the o.c-n prairie probably a mile 
    away from any considerable amount of cover." 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                                                Apri 17, 1,929 
     
     
     
    Prof, Rolbert L1 labours 
    Xana  State Agricultural 0 01 Q14p* 
    lanbatt8a Kant& 
     
    oDear fofosno Nabou"s 
     
             Is there any flz.4 date by Which Ur. Moor   mot m 
    xvp ki ind 1a4bout tbo Bioogical Suve    job which has be   otff*" 
    'him? It now loa possble for mo to get out y     w   %W   inM o 
    IW, alth     I am not ue of it yet. 
     
             I ou unurstan4. of cgurs, how an 1weiat4 Job miht 
    be v   attracti  to a studnt but if Mr. Moore hs.      resebrch 
    o'bi1ty whichyou thinkbehas it *sma       o badforbinnt togt 
    all the eution rosUble, ieri-ckarIy odacýctbun in appli4 
    science# such a is involved under the InstiLtute f~llowship 
    There are loto of biologists in the omtr, sotht       thtf   eld1e 
    mo   orw loss oomptitive, but there a    only oao or two moa of Ow. 
    type of R.- Stoddardandtheir erretice are going to be eaomom4py 
    in oa Aeu , unless Iis a1*  gu~ess   It lto t cr.ý-te som  nw Po.
    
    Urds that we hav* principally In view Ini offering tUs fellowships., 
     
             Let so know about Moore's 4atoo. 
                                  Very *iwcerely youra, 
     
     
                                  Ta Charg*, flwm Suvy 
     
     
    14,2 Obisr Buildin 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
            MANHATTAN, KANSAS 
            DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY      (   ' 
     
     
                           March 29, 1929. 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
    421 Chemistry Building, 
    Universit7 of Wisconsin, 
    Madison, Wisconsin. 
     
    Dear Mr. Leopold: 
     
         I was very much pleased to learn of your favor- 
    able impression of our situation here, gained through 
    your talk with Dr. Hisaw. 
     
         Just a slight cloud has come up over the horizon 
    with respect to the matter, due to Mr. Moore's having 
    been offered a state leadership by the United States 
    Biological Survey from which he is now on leave in order 
    to study. This means a promotion for Mr. Moore, but he 
    is having a hard time trying to decide whether to take 
    this state leadership or continue with his studies. 
     
         As I wrote you some time ago, m hope in the pro- 
    ject lay to a considerable extent in the prospect of 
    having Mr. Moore look after it. I have had so much ex- 
    perience starting students out on projects, snd if one 
    does well then having to start another or sometimes two 
    or three before getting the work under way again after 
    this first efficient one leaves. 
     
         However, we shall look forward to your coming to 
    investigate the situation. I hope that Mr. Moore will 
    decide to go on with his work, as I think it will be 
    best for him to continue his studies. 
     
     
                          Very sincerely yours, 
     
     
    RYN:LL                 Robert K. Nabours. 
    275. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
    File copy. 
     
     
    Pt. sos I. Nab"" 
     
     
    Dow Pro. mkom 
     
    gS 0O4A wift Dr. 7. L. 1mm. I* £.1t1 vayw I  f 
     
       my ouLo fo. -   -" vwie"d bint"" ia us 
     
          I of SO r st a do o a visit Vy*ts M.SA0 
     
          or welfWty"awW **go tt i Vl sottbeoa*mav 
     
     
     
     
                            -L U2PXS 
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Mr~~~ax. ClPGprsaitnt t look like a~ oabot. 
     
     
    A.L. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
           KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
                    MANHATTAN, KANSAS 
                    DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 
     
                                February 20, 1929. 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
    421 Chemistry Building, 
    Madison, Wisconsin. 
     
    Dear Mr. Leopold: 
     
         It has just occurred to me that Dr. F. L. Hisaw 
     
    of the Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, 
     
    was lately a member of our staff. He knows the situa- 
     
    tion here very well, and I think you might be interested 
     
    in talking with him about our situation in general. 
     
     
     
                           Very truly yours, 
     
     
    RKN:LL                 Robert K. Nabours. 
    151. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
            MANHIATTAN. KANSAS 
            TM11)A 1'TL(V1,T                      r5- 7fVTf 
     
     
    January 29, 1929. 
     
     
    itv. Aldo Leopold, 
    421 Chemistry Building, 
    Madison, Wisconsin. 
     
    Dear Mr. Leopold: 
     
         Mr. Roy E. Moore is here where he has been stationed 
     
    for several years. However, I hope you will look up his 
     
    record in the Bureau of Biological Survey. I know that Dr. 
     
    W. B. Bell has him in mind, and could give his personal 
     
    opinion of him. 
     
         Mr. Moore is planning to resume college work here 
     
    this week. It is my understanding that he has secured 
     
    leave of absence from the Survey. 
     
         I hope it will be convenient for you to visit us, 
     
    meet Mir. Moore, and investigate the situation here at 
     
    some not far distant time. 
     
     
                              Very sincerely yours, 
     
     
    R'T\T:LL                  Robert K. Nabours. 
    129. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
            MANHATTAN, KANSAS 
            rVD A n 'rXA VKTT r  ^ (V W 1- fVTV*L 
     
     
    January 12, 1929. 
     
     
            Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
            421 Chemistry Building, 
            Madison, Wisconsin. 
     
            Dear Mr. Leopold: 
     
                 My answer to your letter of December 27 has been delayed 
            due to a week's absence from town and then another week of the 
            flu. The prospectus you sent presents a very interesting 
            project, and I am sure we would like to undertake it, and for 
            which we have excellent environment and facilities. 
     
                 For several years the Forestry, Fish and Game Department 
            of the State, of which Mr. Alva Clapp is now warden, has been 
            undertaking to reintroduce or restock the state with quail, and 
            the College has cooperated in every way possible. Just last 
            year several thousand quail were imported from Mexico at con- 
            siderable cost for distribution throughout the state. 
     
                 We have a young man, who for the past several years has 
            been in the employ of the Biological Survey with the Extension 
            Division and the Department of Zoology here in rodent control 
            work. He has impressed us as being of the finest integrity, 
            and he is aggressive and persistent. Unfortunately, he did 
            not get to finish his college education, and is now contemplat- 
            ing getting full leave of absence from the Biological Survey 
            (they do not permit part time off for study) in order to finish 
            his studies, and possibly to do some graduate work. This man, 
    ,l       Mr. Roy E. Moore, has a splendid record here, and I think also 
      @   with the Biological Survey. Dr. Bell and others in the Biological 
        Survey know him well. Although I have not as yet taken up this 
             matter with Mr. Moore in any detail, it has occurred to me that
    
             he would be the very man for the undertaking. 
     
                  Our ranchmen and farmers in the neighborhood of Manhattan 
             are very favorably disposed towards the College in all matters,
    
             and some of them from time to time have asked us about matters 
             of this kind, and have offered to cooperate in any way possible.
    
             I do not think there would be any trouble in finding the demon-
    
             stration area that would be desirable. It would be a matter of 
             selecting the most favorable place. 
     
                  I hope you will keep us in mind, and that you will arrange
    
            for a visit at some early convenient time. 
     
     
                                          Verort   ially oups   , 
     
                       -                 ~Robert K. Natiours. 
     
     
    nU[li !:J" 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    :Owu 23o I"P. 
     
     
    IY.Ro r L   aav 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Iaht too I wmU 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    File Iopy.  oopies sent Olin, Dode, W aller an4 Dill. 
               Also copies of' oU rinal letter sent. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
                           421 Chwsr Bldg. 
                              De. 27, 1928 
     
     
     
     
      T. Robert K. ?acus 
          -Ma   St. Aff.G C011    , 
                 Manhtta, Kans. 
     
     
                 I enclose hewitb a          of the pronogd qu11 
     
    follw*Lpo   wbich thn   are ýt !1r. Clapp ha in 
     
                 In connetion idt this Prospectus, it migt aIso be 
    "1l to ea   the report of the Gowga 01a      Inestigatio o 
     
    from the U. S. Biologica  Suve. 
     
                 If you doatot is intersted in thin ki. of work, 
    *Ithr on quai or soem other lqcal sje       I woul be gland to dis- 
    cus the   tttterw          I have an op  uiy of clli    at 
     
    Mavfttten, alhog  I cano prms       pariclar data. 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                   (CoPY SENT TO MR. ALVA CLAPP, ST. GAME & FISH WARDEY,
    
                                      ToPEU, XANSAS.) 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
    KANSAS STATE AGRICTULTURAL COLLEGE 
            MANHATTAN. KANSAS 
            DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 
                      December 12, 1928. 
     
     
    Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
    Madison, Wisconsin. 
    Dear Mr. Leopold: 
         Mr. Alva Clapp, State Fish and Game Warden, 
    has informed me that you are in charge of a project 
    which looks into the establishment of experimental 
    farms relating to game propagation and conservation. 
         Mr. Clapp was not able to give me very definite 
    details of your plans, and suggested that I write to 
    you directly. I would be very much pleased to know 
    your plans, and if possible to have a member, or 
    members, of our department cooperate in your under- 
    taking. 
     
     
    Very sincerely yours, 
     
    Robert K.-Nabours. 
     
     
    R KN : LL 
    92. 
     
     
    k 
     
      
    
    				
          
          
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
                                                   Novmbr 224 1934 
     
     
    smo for V1i. 
     
     
      prii  hikoa        Tae Cnr f11 tria ground in KUnsas 
     
    wee. low in 193)4. 1 gathe that ther wm1d be a doce@as as ammi 
     
    with 1933. Mr.      ise to mhintersted in both cl  mAndth 
     
    cycle andI em mpply ftte in~bratt*n on reqast, 
     
                                            A* LO 
    Cycle 
    xsas L" 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
      Prairie chickens are more plentiful than for some 
    years, due to an ideal hatching season, and they are 
    a little more than half grown. There are no cattle [ 
    in the big pastures and the cover is ideal. We also 
    have had a wonderful hatch of quail. We see from 
    two to five bevies of quail every morning returning 
    from working dogs on chickens. 
      Neosho Falls, Kan.                J. H. PARKER. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
                           KANSAS STATE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
     
     
          We recently carried a notation of the formation of a Wild Life Committee
    
    of the State Chamber of Commerce of California. Now comes the information
    that 
    the State Chamber of Commerce of Kansas is interested in conservation, fores-
    
    tation and recreation; devoting several pages to this subject in a booklet
    on 
    "Program for State Development" in Kansas, from which the following
    extracts 
    are quoted: 
     
                "In line with the basic policy of the State Chamber of Com-
    
          merce, which we understand to be that of giving aid, where practi-
    
          cal, to all existing agencies which are working for the upbuilding
    
          of the State rather than setting-up any new or over-lapping organ-
    
          ization, this committee recommends that a start be made towards the
    
          development of hunting, fishing, camping and similar out-doors at-
    
          tractions by lending all possible aid to the Fish and Game Commis-
    
          sion. This will be a small beginning of what should ultimately be 
          a comprehensive plan of conservation work by the State Chamber of 
          Commerce and the State itself. 
                We believe that anyone who has given the subject a thought 
          will agree that no State Development Program worthy of the name 
          could be written without including in it a Conservation project. 
          It deals with a subject for which public appreciation is growing 
          rapidly. It deals with the fundamental economics of right usage 
          of that which nature has given us. We therefore earnestly recom- 
          mend that it be undertaken along the lines outlined." 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
    				
    				
     
    46 
     
     
    T IS popular 
        nowadays to 
        refer to early 
    America as a 
    "hunters' para- 
    dise." Also, con- 
    tradictory as it 
    may seem, there 
    is a widespread 
    tendency, even 
    among those who 
    so refer to it, to 
    brand as exagger- 
    ations the chroni- 
    cles left behind by 
    earlier generations 
    describing the vast 
    hordes of game. 
    Yet the weighing 
    of the evidence 
    points to the in- 
    evitable conclu- 
    sion that, far from 
    being greatly ex- 
    aggerated, those 
    early accounts of 
    eyewitnesses pre- 
    sent accurate pic- 
    tures of America 
    as the greatest 
    huntinggroundon 
    earth when first 
    the white man set 
    foot upon it. 
      To declare to- 
     
     
    day to a K4.ansas                              fflar 
    hunter that his 
    state was once the habitat of the grizzly would be to invite 
    incredulity. To assert that an early adventurer once counted 
    220 grizzlies in one day in Western Kansas would assure 
    one's being placed under observation as an eligible candidate 
    for the incurable ward. 
      It does seem somewhat incredible to us of today. Yet in 
    Pattie's Personal Narrative, an account of Pattie, his 
    father and other members of the fur 
    brieade that crosse'd througwh North- 
     
     
    western Kansas in 1822, Pattie cites such 
    an occurrence during a day's march near 
    the head of the Smoky Hill River. 
     
         Trapper and Historian 
     
    AFTER numerous adventures in New 
    XMexico and other parts of the South- 
    west, Pattie trapped down the Gila River 
    in Arizona to its confluence with the 
    Colorado; then down that stream to its 
    mouth. It was his second or third at- 
    tempt. On each former occasion he had 
    been one of the few survivors that had 
    turned back. 
      On this final trip, with six surviving 
    companions, he crossed from the mouth 
    of the Colorado to the Pacific Coast, 
    eventually to be imprisoned by the 
    Spaniards in San Diego. 
      The historian Thwaites later edited 
    and checked Pattie's original book. The 
    characters, Spanish, English and Amer- 
    ican, of whom Pattie made mention, the 
    incidents which he related, all were 
    checked by Thwaites from official docu- 
    ments relating to Pattie's imprisonment, 
    Spanish army and official archives, the 
    accounts left behind by others who met 
    Pattie, and so on. All checkable portions 
    of the work are amazingly accurate. 
      Why, then, should we doubt him in 
    the one particular of the apparently too 
    numerous grizzlies? On no other points 
    does Pattie seem to exaggerate in the 
     
     
    slgnitest. Also, it must be recallea 1fat 
     
     
    weasr. jnoortng v5ul'ato on rne LAne o0 rte Aansas-Pactfic 
     
      in a life of such incredible adventure as that led by 
      Pattie, grizzlies were of minor importance. He accounted 
      for their amazing numbers in that vicinity by the fact that 
      they were feeding on the carcasses of dead buffaloes; also 
      that they were killing such animals as ventured within 
      rushing distance. Many other early travelers commented 
      upon this trait of the grizzly. 
     
     
      The journals of 
    the Lewis and 
    Clark Expedition 
    dwell at some 
    length upon a sim- 
    ilar if less'numer- 
    ous gathering of 
    grizzlies near the 
    head of the Mis- 
    souri to feed upon 
    the carcasses of 
    drownedbuffaloes. 
    Several of their 
    party had narrow 
    escapes from the 
    bears. Pattie's 
    party was not so 
    fortunate. One 
    member was 
    charged and killed 
    by a grizzly. 
     
      Bear Facts 
     
    S IMILARLY, a 
       catastrophe 
    occurred within 
    the ranks of an- 
    other party that 
    invaded the gen- 
    eral region of Pat- 
    tie's flock of bears 
    from a different 
    direction at about 
    the same time. 
     
     
    xattroaa                           One of the party, 
                                       Jacob Fowler, 
    kept a journal, later edited by Coues. The party came up 
    the Arkansas River, and when just beyond the western 
    boundary of the present state of Kansas, near the present 
    site of Las Animas, Colorado, one of its members was 
    charged and killed by a grizzly bear. 
      That region was the known habitat of large numbers of 
    grizzlies. Considering scores of early accounts of grizzlies 
                     congregating to feed upon buffalo car- 
     
     
    -.aoo, -tJ    wv U    sL . up -ac- 
    curacy of the checkable portions of the 
    narrative, the similar occurrence in the 
    ranks of Fowler's party, there seems no 
    reason to doubt that Pattie at least saw 
    a sizable swarm of bears on that occa- 
    sion. 
      For many years it has been a hobby 
    of mine to collect the chronicles left be- 
    hind by American adventurers and ex- 
    plorers on our frontiers of a hundred 
    years and more ago. It is a fascinating 
    pursuit to wander back over early trails 
    through those pages to rediscover an 
    America that remains forgotten or un- 
    heard of by present generations. Among 
    other points of interest, all early chroni- 
    clers of the frontiers picture an abun- 
    dance of game that seems beyond the 
    realm of comprehension when compared 
    with our present conception of plenty. 
    Strangelyenough, observers of more than 
    a hundred years ago, while writing of 
    game conditions which seem to us in- 
    credible exaggerations, nevertheless 
    commented scathingly or sorrowfully 
    upon the fact that wanton slaughter had 
    left but a remnant of former abundance; 
    a trait, incidentally, that has persisted 
    through all such writings down to the 
    present day. 
      The most popular gauges by which 
    past abundance is contrasted to present 
    scarcity, of courserfre the triple classics 
    of destruction-the extermination of 
    the beaver by the trappers throughout 
     
     
    The Lewis and Clark Expedition 
     
     
    (Continued on Page 48) 
     
     
    THE SATURDAY EVENING POST 
     
     
    .May 24, 1930 
     
     
                                                                            
                                                                            
         L] 
     
    BACK=TRACK-ING ON.ýZAR*LY 
     
     
     
        GAME TRAILS =,ay HAL G. EVARTS 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    THE SATURDAY EVENINJ4 0POST 
     
     
    ,May 24,1930 
     
     
       (Continued from Page 46) 
     almost the entire continent, the 
     slaughter of the last buffalo 
     herds by- the hide hunters al- 
     most half a century later, and 
     the subsequent extermination 
     of the passenger-pigeon hordes 
     by market gunners and squab 
     hunters. All have been so widely 
     heralded as to call for no com- 
     ment here save by way of a brief 
     reference to illustrate our point. 
       That widespread tendency to 
    brand as exaggeration all early 
    accounts of game abundance is 
    leveled largely upon the written 
    estimates of eyewitnesses as to 
    the numbers of buffaloes and 
    pigeons remaining in the 70's, 
    during the height of the hide- 
    hunting and pigeon-gunning 
    campaigns. All that occurred at 
    a relatively late date, yet ob-" 
    servers of that day, writing the 
    accounts now deemed exaggera- 
    tions, were unanimous in declar- 
    ing that the buffalo and pigeons 
    that remained were but pitiful 
    remnants of former vast hosts. 
     
     
    Organized Slaughter in the Old Days 
     
     
    S IMILARLY, the final hectic spasm of pigeon slaughter 
       accounted merely for the last remaining flocks, the num- 
    bers of which, in a still earlier day, had staggered the 
    imagination of observers. 
      The wild trappers returning from the wilderness with 
    fortun~s in furs stowed in flotilhla of boataortranasported 
    by pack train, the herds of buffaloes that "blackened the 
    prairies" as the pigeon migrations "darkened the sun," all
    
    were spectacular and gripped the imagination of the be- 
    holder. 
      Beaver trapping, hide hunting and pigeon gunning 
    each in its way was an organized industry that provided a 
    livelihood for hosts of individuals. For those and other 
    reasons, more eyewitness accounts, more data and more 
    statistical records were left behind relating to the beaver, 
    the buffalo and the pigeon than those pertaining to all 
    other species of wild life combined. 
                   (Continued on Page 179) 
     
     
    A Lively Scene on an Anterican Prairie. 
           A Buffalo Hunt by Steam 
     
     
    The Disappearance of the Buffaloes 
     
     
    AT1O NEWSPAPER, 
     
     
    - ----   -- - - - ~   ~   A Ln an in  u,,oor 
     
     
    48 
     
     
    ] 
    i 
     
     
    l 
    1 
     
    t 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    THE SATURDAY EVENING .POST 
     
     
    BACK-TRACKING ON EARLY GA E TRAILS 
                                              (Continued from Page 48) 
     
     
      If nowadays we are inclined to brand as   Townsend commented casually upon
    the    other writers of round 1890. It seems even 
    exaggerationc those triple classics of slaugh-  great numbers of deer, turkey,
    prairie hens  more preposterous to us that while game 
    ter at relatively late dates, and upon which  and other game on all sides
    as the walk  was so abundant that a kill of "200 plovers 
    so much evidence is available, how are we progressed. Black-bellied plovers
    he fouild  a day, 1000 in a week" could still be made 
    to view still earlier accounts of the over- in such numbers that frequently
    several by market gunners, both Hough and Lef- 
    whelming abundance of less spectacular    acres of prairie would be covered
    and one fingwell should consider the country almost 
    species of American game birds and ani-   or two shots fired into them provided
    food gameless as compared with past abundance. 
    mals?                                     for all hands.                
               Yet it is evident that they and many of 
      For example, if the average sportsman     Near the little village of Columbia,
    Mis-  their contemporaries did so consider it. 
    of today has so much as heard of the Care- souri, thirty men engaged in a
    squirrel hunt, Also it is certain that their views were justi- 
    lina parrakeet, he thinks of it vaguely as and between sunrise and sunset
    1200 squir- fled. 
    a shy, rare bird of dense Southeastern for-  rels were brought to bag. Townsend
    wrote  Leffingwell wrote of a pigeon-nesting 
    ests, hunted down to extinction for its   that despite the persistent, year-long
        ground in 1878 that was from three to ten 
    gaudy plumage. Far from     it. Though    slaughter, the squirrels did not
    seem to di-  miles wide and forty miles long, with from 
    never so numerous as the pigeon, it did   minish in numbers; that, as the
    two nat- five to fifty nests in every tree, where hun- 
    exist in vast numbers. It was the opposite uralists moved on, it seemed that
    "there  dreds of gunners and squab hunters were 
    of shy-so tame that parrakeets could be   was a squirrel for every tree."
               getting in their deadly work. Yet, at the 
    killed with stones and clubs. From the day                              
                time of his writing in 1890, the pigeon was 
    of the earliest settlers in America it was        Huge Bags of the 9o's 
                no more and the parrakeet was extinct. He 
    hunted ruthlessly as a game bird and for                                
               wrote that the swan was so nearly gone that 
    feathers. In view of its habits, it is a mys- For those who consider such
    casual fig- it was only by a fortunate chance that a 
    tery how the parrakeet escaped extinction ures so incredible as to be stamped
    as exag-  hunter could expect to secure a shot at one. 
    during the first century of white settle-  geration, it might be well to
    peruse the  Goss, the famous Kansas naturalist, already 
    ment in America.                          literature of a still earlier day,
    wherein the was railing against unrestricted slaughter. 
      An idea of its original abundance may be vast squirrel migrations are described.
    If In 1891 he wrote that the majestic white 
    gathered from a few observations made by   those, too, are believed to be
    still greater  whooping crane was a very rare visitor in 
    the naturalist Townsend in 1834. Recall  departures from the truth, one may
    fall Kansas, the heart of its former habitat. 
    that long prior to that date the buffalo had  back upon yet earlier statistics.
      Yet Audubon had described whoopers in 
    become extinct east of the Mississippi and   Dr. E. W. Nelson ferreted out
    and pub-  clanging hosts of many thousands in the 
    that a deer was becoming cause for com-  lished the fact that in 1749 a bounty
    was   South, and Alexander Henry had written 
    ment in the great hunting grounds of Ken-  placed on gray squirrels in Pennsylvania
     casually of lakes and marshes in Canada 
    tucky and Tennessee. Missouri was well and that 640,000 scalps were brought
    in. and the Dakotas literally covered with 
    settled and the beaver had been trapped al- Also, that in 1808 a law was
    in force in Ohio  swans and white cranes. The buffalo had 
    most to the point of extermination clear to which required that every free
    white male been extinct east of the Mississippi for sixty 
    the Pacific Coast. So, in game matters, deliver 100 squirrel scalps annually.
        years, exterminated in the West a decade 
    1834 was relatively a late date in Missouri. Evidently, then, Townsend's
    squirrel before; deer had become extinct in Ver- 
       Townsend walked through that statewith  hunt was not out of line with
    fact. As to mont fifteen years before and were very 
     his fellow naturalist, Nuttal, in that year. Townsend's acres of plovers,
    more than a  scarce throughout the entire East at the 
     Vast swarms of game were such common-     half century later, in 1890, despite
    two cen-  time Hough, Goss and Leffingwell were 
     place matters to him that he mentioned    turies of unrestricted market
    hunting, plov- writing. Bears, elk, deer and turkeys were 
     them  but casually. Even the beautiful ers still were incredibly abundant.
    In that  extinct in Kansas. There were no more kills 
     Carolina parrakeet, fourteen inches in    year Emerson Hough wrote that
    in Illinois of 1200 squirrels in a day's hunt in Missouri, 
     length and with lovely, shining plumage in a bag of 100 to 150 golden or
    upland plovers  asin Townsend's time. 
     brilliant colors, seemed to him to all for no  per g  a da  or a p y of
    spo   w          en   e c       theshooting that had 
     special comment. The flocks                                            
                           s    t, 
     round in great numbers, he related, hud-  could be killed "even now"
    by market      those species, it is apparent in the very na- 
     dMin togother in Dacked ranks on every  hunters, if one had the heart for
    such   ture of things that a dreadful toll must also 
     
     
    t tore through slaughter. Hough, even then beginning to  have been exacted
    from among the swarm- 
    urious, peering realize that American game seemed des- ing ranks of the shore
    birds and waterfowl. 
    on the ground, tined for extermination, wrote that the  It is not surprising,
    therefore- even though 
    all about. In- sportsmen should be guided by conscience   they did not marvel
    that "200 plovers a 
    their habit to  in the matter of limiting their spring kills  day, 1000 in
    a week" could be killed by 
     
     
    close up their ranks after each shot, as if by  whent ne nen plovers were
    heavy with eggs. mar ve gunners n  n  A.U7S , L-L, 
    pressing closer together they would find  He stated that he could kill three
    or four well, Goes, Hough and their contemporaries 
    safety. He wrote that, in view of their   dozen upland plovers any day in
    July      considered the remaining game only a piti- 
    tameness and habits, the slaughter of par- within twenty miles of Chicago,
    but did not  ful remnant as compared to a glorious past. 
    rakeets was the most murderous and least  care to shoot at that time of year.
    
    sportsmanlike of hunting. If, after almost  It is difficult to imagine such
    an abun-      Too Much Canvasbacki 
    two centuries of ruthless parrakeet hunting, dance of game in the vicinity
    of Chicago in 
    they still were as numerous as naturalists the late 80's and early 90's,
    in view of the  Leffingwell intimated a future with still 
    and observers of 1830-50 report, what must fact that thousands of gunners
    were hunt- lesser abundance of game, Goss predicted 
    have been the number of the original parra-  ing plovers for the city markets.
    Market  it, while Hough was even more explicit. He 
    keet hordes?                              hunting for all varieties of game
    birds still cited the teeming abundance of the recent 
                                              held sway throughout the greater
    part of  past, the unrestricted hunting of the pros- 
         Days of Plenty in Missouri           the United States and game was
    displayed  ent, and flatly predicted an absolutely 
                                              in all the markets and served regularly
    in gameless future, and that almost immedi- 
      A number of years ago I read an account every restaurant and hotel.   
               ately, unless the tendency toward wanton 
    of wagoners-waiting at Independence,         Nevertheless, there still remained
    stu- slaughter was checked forthwith. He de- 
    Missouri, as they prepared to set forth   pendous numbers of wild fowl in
    addition  manded if Americans wished their sons to 
    upon the Santa Fe Trail shooting "par-    to the shore birds. Leffingwell,
    a Chicago grow up in town without the possibility of 
    rots," of which there were thousands in the  sportsman, wrote of killing
    eighty redheads  going afield with rod and gun. 
    region. I knew, of course, that the refer- in the first hour of shooting
    in the morning,  As one progresses backward, so to speak, 
    ence was to parrakeets. Curiosity impelled stating that he could have killed
    200 as through earlier chronicles, one finds that 
    me to delve into matters until I learned  easily,                       
               the accounts depicting the abundance of 
    that the beautiful parrakeet, instead of be- Within my own days a market-shooting
      game from 1850 to 1890 pale into relative 
    ing a resident only of obscure swampy     friend killed 375 canvasbacks,
    redheads and  insignificance beside the tales of still ear- 
    Southeastern forests, had been abundant   bluebills in one morping's shoot.
    Still an-  lier observers. There are even records of 
    summer residents of my native state of     other friend on the same marsh
    at a later workmen in the Chesapeake region having 
    Kansas, nesting in colonies until well into date killed eighty-seven mallards
    with six  threatened to rebel unless they were given 
    the 70's along the wooded streams that     shots of a pump gun as they rose
    in thou- relief from a straight diet of canvasback 
    threaded the prairies. The parrakeet has   sands from a hole in the ice.
    A market  ducks, the cheapest and most easily procur- 
    long been extinct,                         gunner on the Cheyenne bottoms
    killed 136 able food. So much for the lordly "can." 
       It is not surprising that Townsend and  ducks with six shots from a pump.
    It was  While on the subject of feathered game, 
     Nuttal failed to be greatly impressed by the  this last affair, widely advertised,
    that  it must be pointed out that the turkey, far 
     vast flocks of parrakeets in Missouri, be- roused public sentiment to the
    point where  from being a rare bird of isolated forests, 
     cause then those brilliant birds still per-, market hunting was prohibited
    in Kansas, actually existed in great gangs throughout 
     sisted in huge flocks throughout most of  though it flourished almost unchecked
    for the greater part of the Western prairie 
     their native range; though sadly depleted several years thereafter.    
            states, frequenting every water course, un- 
     from their original numbers. And it is not  In view of the intensive market
    hunting til a relatively late date. Mr. Smythe of 
     human custom to marvel at sights that are that had been conducted from the
    first ad- Wichita, Kansas, told me of a turkey hunt 
     of commonplace occurrence in our daily    vent of the white man, it now
    seems almost in which he and a friend engaged in the 
     lives so much as it is to marvel at those of  incredible that plovers and
    other game 70's. Desirous of securing a supply of meat 
     the past who could consider such vanished birds persisted in Illinois in
    such numbers  for the winter, the two men drove south of 
     sights as commonplace,                    as described by Hough, Leffingwell
    and  Wichita for several days and located a 
     
     
    great turkey roost in a timbered creek bot- 
    tom. In one night, using double-barreled, 
    muzzle-loading guns, they killed 114 tur- 
    keys and hauled the meat home. 
      In his manuscript in the Kansas State 
    Historical Society, George Brown tells of a 
    turkey hunt of far greater magnitude in 
    that general locality in the spring of 1869. 
    When returning with Custer's and Sheri- 
    dan's forces after the campaign against the 
    hostiles on the Washita, great droves of 
    turkeys were encountered on the North 
    Fork of the Canadian. Sheridan permitted 
    the men of the command to engage in a 
    general turkey hunt. Brown estimated 
    that at least 5000 turkeys were slaughtered 
    in the course of the hunt, most of them left 
    to rot where they fell; and that at a date 
    when the turkey had largely disappeared in 
    the East. 
      To revert again to our larger game ani- 
    mals, one is apt to think of the buffalo as 
    outnumbering all other species combined. 
    The herds "blackened the prairies" as the 
    pigeon hordes "darkened the sun." But it 
    is highly probable that both the pronghorn 
    antelope and the deer actually outnum- 
    bered the bison. 
     
         Deer Steaks for the Miners 
      Many early observers on the plains testi- 
    fied that while the antelope was not so 
    spectacular, it existed in numbers equal to 
    those of its heavier plains mate. From the 
    days of Lewis and Clark on down, traders, 
    trappers and travelers wrote of the vast 
    throngs of antelopes. In this connection it 
    must be recalled that in the deserts and 
    semi-arid regions of Washington, Oregon, 
    California and parts of Idaho, Utah, Ne- 
    vada, Arizona and Mexico, where the buf- 
    falo was unknown, antelopes ranged in 
           Th  as f the deer presenits a simpilar 
    picture While nowhere so plentiful as the 
    buffalo in its great prairie range, the habi- 
    tat of the deer was far larger. Some faint 
    idea of the original number of deer may be 
    gained by a recent estimate that around 
    500,000 deer exist today in Pennsylvania. 
    California boasts almost as many; possibly 
    more. The great mule-deer herds of the 
    Kaibab Forest in the Arizona Strip, and the 
    teeming herds of Columbia blacktails in 
    British Columbia and Southeastern Alaska, 
    all aid in visualizing the past when deer were 
    similarly abundant throughout their vast 
    range from Southeastern Alaska to South- 
    ern Mexico, from the wilds of Quebec to the 
    Everglades of Florida. A friend told me of 
    having seen forty-odd big freight wagons 
    loaded to capacity with deer saddles des- 
    tined for the mining camps of Colorado. 
    Another told me of having killed thirty-two 
    mule deer in one morning in Wyoming for 
    the market. There is a record of one na- 
    tive's having killed eighty-odd blacktails 
    for their hides in one day in Southeastern 
    Alaska. 
       Right up to the end of the last century 
     such kills were being made wherever in the 
     West any game was left. It is fairly cer- 
     tain, I believe, that originally the deer out- 
     numbered the buffalo. 
       Dropping back a bit, in 1755 James Smith 
     was captured by the Indians and adopted 
     by them, living among them for a number 
     of years. His subsequent narrative, among 
     other items of interest, reveals the incred- 
     ible abundance of game in Western Penn- 
     sylvania and the country between the Ohio 
     and the Great Lakes. Deer swarmed on 
     every hand, as did turkeys. Buffalo, elk, 
     wolves and panthers were numerous. Bears 
     were so plentiful that it was not unusual for 
     an Indian hunter to bag several in a day's 
     hunt even in midwinter, by locating the 
     denning trees and killing the animals in 
     their dens. The Indian youths hunted rac- 
     coons by day and trapped them by the 
     hundreds with deadfalls round all the 
     Indian villages. 
             (Continued on Page 182) 
     
     
    179 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
    THE SATURDAY EVENING POST                                               
                            May 24,1930 
     
     
      SI earty r geI t 
    the prairies of 1 
    game, so Henry I 
    trayal of conditio: 
    prairies. 
      Even at that et 
    practically gone fi 
    east of the Miss: 
    made by Henry r( 
     
     
    A Short Short Story 
     
     
    dollar or check to coupon and mail today. 
     
         KozAIh 
     
       e Dry Wash Cloth 
              RFG PAT.  O.OF.S   C*ANAVA 
    KOZAK, Inc., 8 Park St., Batavia, N. Y. 
    Enclosed is my check for i for 
    KOZAKs at Sl each. If I wish, my money will be refunded 
    -and I'm the sole judgel 
     
     
    animal, the rest being left to rot. "Such is 
    the improvidence of men in this land of 
    abundance," Henry wrote. 
     
     
    Killing Bears for Lard 
     
     
      r- ainmost, uaaly entries oi sucn KinlS were 
    matters of business record. Henry was the 
    trader always. For those who are inclined 
    to hoot -with derision at Pattie's account of 
    the swarm of grizzlies encountered during a 
    day's march on the Kansas prairies, Henry's 
    entries concerning bears on these more 
    northerly prairies might prove of interest. 
      While marching in search of an advan- 
    tageous point at which to construct head- 
    quarters for the operations of the winter of 
    1800-01, he found bears extremely numer- 
    ous, as he did other game, jotting down the 
     
     
      It 
    all by 
    Henry 
    his pa 
    the lic 
    paid 
      Cer 
    moun 
    forest 
    have 
    of pra 
    Henry 
    1802-( 
    tion t 
     
     
    out attempting to estimate tnese latter  anA  anmnin Sheep still range in
    thousands 
    nevertheless it is safe to conclude at various points over a vast area from
    the 
    )ears were not rare on the prairies in  Cassiars of British Columbia to Clark
    Lake 
    y's day.                            at the base of the Alaska Peninsula,
    from 
    at the ten-day bear hunt had not de- the head of the Pelly in the Yukon to
    the 
    l their numbers to any great extent is  Endicott Range in the Arctic, there
    is small 
    t from the fact that Henry, superin- reason to doubt that similar numbers
    of 
    ig the work of erecting the stockade, bighorns ranged in the milder climes
    as re- 
    nany bears daily, none of which he  ported by scores of early eyewitnesses.
    
    . One of his hunters encountereda 
    albino bear, but failed to kill the white  The Lost irt of Exaggeration 
    Li. 
    nust be recalled that the entries were It is unnecessary to go into any estimate
    
    way of being business records; for  of the original numbers of the elk. Vast
    
    I, of course, was obliged to account to herds are described by many early
    explor- 
    rtners in the Northwest Company for ers and adventurers in the Eastern prairies
    
    luor, trade goods, and so on, which he and semiwooded districts. Lewis and
    Clark 
    )ut to his hunters,                 found them in great numbers on the Colum-
    
    tain fur bearers, now denizens of   bia. Thousands were killed for the markets
    
    Iain fastnesses and isolated northern  in Colorado, and the California stampeders
    
    s, are popularly supposed never to  described them  as ranging in bands of
    
    been inhabitants of the prairies, even  thousands in the broad valleys of
    that state. 
    airies threaded by wooded streams. There still remain somewhere between 
    rIs tabulated records for the winter of 25,000 and 50,000 head ranging the
    Yellow- 
    3) on lower Red River show, in addi- stone region, and many smaller herds
    in va- 
    o great numbers of the usual prairie rious parts of the nation, so some idea
    of 
     
     
    times, nenry inseo 6vi wonl pelts among 
    his returns for that year. 
      Yet even in Henry's time the Northwest 
    was not particularly new. Oddly enough, 
    one of the first entries in his journal deals 
    with the fact that some localities, once 
    abounding in beavers, now were entirely 
    devoid of them because of excessive hunting. 
      Ten years before Henry's advent upon 
    the scene, Mackenzie had reached the Arc- 
    tic Ocean by way of Great Slave Lake and 
    the Mackenzie River, a few years later hav- 
    ing crossed the mountain ranges of British 
     
     
    ginning with the accounts of the earliest 
    French explorers, one may cruise ahead 
    through the pages left behind by later ad- 
    venturers and find that, almost generation 
    by generation, the penned portrayals of 
    game abundance, though seeming to us in- 
    credible, nevertheless paint word pictures 
    that deal with progressively fewer and 
    fewer numbers of each species in every dis- 
    trict in turn as the years rolled on. We 
    must either confess, then, that the game 
    was there and grew fewer and fewer in 
            (Continued on Paire 185) 
     
     
    182 
     
     
    '**'Ll G 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    THE SATURDAY EVENING, POST 
     
     
           (Continued from Page ,182) -%, 
     numbers with each succeeding generation, 
     or ascribe such progressive moderation to 
     the fact that the art of exaggeration was on 
     the wane. 
       We need not touch here upon the original 
    numbers of the moose, the mountain goat 
    and the musk ox. 
      For purposes of present and past corn- 
    parison, we have one outstanding example 
    that may serve as somewhat of a gauge. 
    The caribou has disappeared from much of 
    its original range; practically extinct in 
    Minnesota and with but few remaining in 
    Maine and Nova Scotia, the former vast 
    caribou herds of Labrador and Newfound- 
    land also are sadly depleted. Once ranging 
    the Alaskan Peninsula in great herds, but a 
    few caribou now remain there. It is gone 
    from the Kenai Peninsula. More than 
    1,000,000 reindeer now usurp parts of the 
    former exclusive caribou range in Alaska. 
    Hunting for the market for several decades 
    has depleted the caribou herds of Alaska 
    and the Yukon. Much of their former range 
     
     
    in the Canadian provinces has been settled 
    and the caribou killed off. It must be con- 
    ceded, therefore, that the caribou herds 
    have been greatly depleted from their origi- 
    nal numbers. 
       Nevertheless, the caribou still ranges in 
     millions in British Columbia, the Yukon, 
     Alaska and the country between the Mac- 
     kenzie River and the Yukon. 
       Yukon River steamers are delayed by 
    swimming hordes of migrating caribou as 
    once engineers were forced to halt their 
    trains because of traveling herds of buffaloes 
    on the prairies. 
      The caribou herds that still range the Bar- 
    ren Grounds from Northern Saskatchewan 
    to Victoria Land are variously estimated 
    to contain from 7,000,000 to 20,000,000. 
      The temperate zone in North America 
    afforded the finest body of range land in the 
    world. The Arctic and sub-Arctic regions, 
    naturally, are much less hospitable. Sup- 
    pose that we concede-even after being 
    exterminated over great areas and de- 
    pleted everywhere in numbers that in the 
     
     
    northern ranges from Newfoundland to 
    Unimak Island off the tip of the Alaslkan 
    Peninsula there are still some 8,000,000 
    head of caribou ranging. It is a most con- 
    servative estimate, surely. 
       What, then, must have been the original 
    numbers of the caribou herds? And what 
    must have been the original numbers of 
    buffalo, elk, deer and antelope when the 
    more southerly ranges were stocked to 
    capacity with those animals, as early ex- 
    plorers described them? 
      In the light of the remaining caribou 
    herds, early accounts of similarly huge 
    numbers of other game animals in a more 
    friendly climate do not seem to lack plausi- 
    bility. 
      The game fields of Africa and Asia afford 
    a greater variety of species than do those of 
    America. All evidence, however, points to 
    the fact that in regard to sheer numbers, 
    the North American continent, when the 
    white men first set foot upon it, was not a 
    mere "hunters' paradis"but preeminently 
    the greatest hunting ground-in the world. 
     
     
    A 
     
     
    Y01 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
        hack 
     
     
    t/e Losf You/b 
     
    of AN'r FLOOR 
     
     
    185 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
                             WORTH TSN MILLION A YEAR 
     
          "That Kansas gets at least 1i0,000,000 worth of good out of 
    its game, fish and birds every year, is asserted by J. B. Doze, 
    former warden. This is the way he computes it, and the figures 
    look reasonable. 
          "Ducks, geese and other migratory birds shot every year would
    
    sell on the market for #1,000,000, and quail for f5O,0O0. The 
    60,000 rabbits sent away every year bring around 450,000, counting 
    Jack rabbits. The prairie chicken bag will sell for #25,000. All 
    other game, including rabbits shot for eating purposes, doves, eto., 
    will bring 020,000. The actual business done by Kansas fur dealers 
    exceeds $1,250,000 a year. A million dollars' worth of fish is 
    eaten every year. The birds which are not shot but are protected 
    by the hunters are worth five or six million dollars every year 
    In taking care of noxious weeds and harmful insects, as it is es- 
    timated by the biological survey at Washington, D. C., that each 
    bird is worth a dime a year to agriculture and that the average 
    bird population is two to the acre. This estimate is probably 
    too low." 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                                    RI. U SPAT OV 
                                    FSTABISNED 180 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
           Hunting Popular as Season Cens in Knsas.      a   Protector 0. D.
    Steele 
     reports that in the Cheyenne.Bottoms, Iear Hoisington, Kans., on Sunday,
    Sep- 
     tember 16, the opening date for hunting ducks, he was out at 3;10 a.m. for
    
     breakfast, and every restaurant and eating house in town was jammed, so
    that 
     he had to stand in line. Hardware stores were doing a thriving business,
    sell- 
     ing cartridges and hunting !icenses. It was estimated that there were fully
    
     i0,000 ducks on the 42 flooded ections, and about 900 to 1,000 hunters.
    The 
     estimated kill was about 1,000 d:ucks. Of the numbers of hunters checked
    up by 
     Mr. Steele and a State game warden, only'two were found with 15, the legal
    bag 
     limit, and about 50 per cent of the huntaes had not killed a duck. Most
    of the 
     birds were locally bred mallards, pintails, widgeons, and teal, the last
    being 
    -the most numerous. 
     
           Tells of Florida Hurricane. - An interesting report on the hurricane
    
     that struck Florida on September 16, with the resultant loss of life and
    proper- 
     ty, was furnished the Survey by Game Protector J. V. Kelsey about a week
    after 
     the storm. He stated that the greatest loss of life was along the eastern
    shore 
     Cle1e Okeechote-eand tat ittw      neaver be know  u   how many persons
    were 
           kiea out proao    eas          ies would be 4ound. On -epember 23,
    
                                        -8- 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
       The following interesting letter from Mr. W. H. Anderson, of the Federal
    Car- 
    tridge Corporation, tells us of his remarkable success in raising ringneek
    pheas- 
    ants. This is the kind of work every individual sportsman who has a little
    land 
    available, should be doing to help maintain a good supply of    and game
    birds. 
     
                                                              Wilder, eansas.
    
                                                              S19th, 1928. 
     
          Du Pont Company, 
          Wilmington, Dele., 
     
          Major L. W. T. Waller, Jr.' 
     
          Dear Sir: 
     
                 Your Promotion News Bulletin comes regularly and is read with
    much 
          interest. 
                 Naturally being interested; apart from professionally, I obtained
    
          a cook and two pheasant hens. From which the little flock increased
    the 
          first year to 40, putting at large this past Spring 5 pair and keeping
    18 
          hens, can report as follows:- 
                 have distributed mostly to sportsmen and Izaak Walton League
    chap- 
          ters over 1000 eggs, hatched 40 more, and have just finished new pens.
    
               Of those at liberty we have been getting reports now here, now
    there, 
           over a radius of 3 miles, and of one small flock; this year's brood.
    
               ýe have small farm, 80 acres Just West of Kansas City on
    Highway,ý 
          which the flat-dwellers use to dispose of their surplus cats. 
               Right sort of protection will soon place Missouri and Kansas in
    
          position to have good pheasant shooting in a few years time. 
     
                                     Yours very truly, 
     
     
    (Signed) M. H. Anderson, Salesman. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
             95 
          CRAMS 
     8x 11 Outline Map 
        KANSAS 
            SCALE 
     
            COPYRIGHT 
    THE GEORGE F CRAM COMPANY 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    I 
     
     
    SH      THOMA.                                f ..I..H.... 
     
     
     
                             jEE  LUNCOLN 
     
     J GRLLIS                           --       IU. LL WO h 
     
                  I                I      I          - ' - 
          O                  ....if T-r LAu"N "EoS  * 
     
     
     
    HAILTON  jKE rN  MP #iEY 
     
                        ZR~i       EDWARDS 
     
       O RN T 5A                    wlowA  RAT 
              MORTO  I I                         KINGMIAN 
         *STWN jC i                   C            ARi,, 
           II       ii     o  . . . 
     
     
     
     
     
     
                                 RAND MrNALLY 
                              LETTER SIZE OUTLINE MAP 
     
                                 KANSAS              ooyrig, 
     
     
    I             I 
    SALINE 
     
    I MPHERSON MARION 
     
     
     
       _       I 
     
     
      SUMNE 
     
     
    - I               I 
     
     
         SCALE 
    t by Rand MCNally & Company, C 
       XADE IN Ut S. A. 
     
     
    1 
     
     
    1 
     
     
    96.       9   23 
     
     
    06            OP 
     
     
    The Law Prohibits Copying or Reproduetion by Any Proeess for Personal ise
    or Resale. 
     
     
      iREPSUC WASHIfNOTC 
     
     
     
     
     
      OTTWA         I 
    *1      DICKINS 
     
     
    100 
     
     
    Wo           !do 
     
     
         MAitLL EMAH    BROWN 
      MARSHALL 
     
     
     
     
     
          II                                      " 
     
          i I . . .. i           - 
                      7ATHi ISO 
    RTL~y 
    	
    				
     
    Copy to Mr. 1k. T. Cox 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
               Jul 2,                              193 
     
     
     Dr. 0. W hmo 
     Pfkbvilla 
     
     D   b. MUGW* 
     
             I wired ym rgtt1y Wat I  m  of n mtable      *14.t, 
     for the Ketc postition asiroa of t an 
     
             QA reason or ty a1  I a that the Now Delbrm   mn    h 
     past yawt hav  witdteom          almost dry at men traine in wildif.t 
     
             I ko of one mm Wh  14 bo        fors t r p 
     bt I dobt if you cu       hin beams. hel s .*e  Us a good  , ,4 th 
     job twove,Wo  mh Iss* polttiod wI*. A~mrin1y I did no~t fee alk 
     lityw to omtitea hi.  in an aifo4 w     in a wr  o a 
     r "for toto William         s   bosettlnt A6Ii tstution, hlmk MY 
     ft11m, Tisooxota 
     
             Su     Is about 0 ya o    He ha n M o         -ami ometon, 
     It heowas ootot*d - m            I at gm in Ibm at tor ti 
     I wa  -   ng the I Om    ion Plan. D   ballat wo   In 
     thin pvoition, ho fell vitimo, a    pitt  ust, after which ho 
            t  Rwttlinat job whic ilvs the petiao gatms mm- 
     agemet onas large are o mb-ýsd tam       beingpmoae in centra 
     Wisconsin. In addition to ben  an epeienood 6m  amae, au 
     has smthig aki to oS1.o in law onfbowostna nd wadtomiai 
     I consider his the best law  tonfoem  ma I hmw of, both as m 
     IndIvIdiu p~rfora  ean as an .waumv, 
     
             I he no 1*u whther you coul interest his In yaur openin 
     and In ria, of his post e~rsns h oul dou.btlesso wat to knw a 
     whale lot abot you  mst-v before conuidering it trome4ye 
                              Your*s increy, 
     
     
     
                                   A14 Leopold 
                             Priofesso of Goo gmanfat 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                           Kentucky Game & fish Commission 
                                    Franxývfort 
     
     
     
    November 10, 1933 
     
     
     
    Mr. C. L. Horn, President 
    Federal Cartridge Corp. 
    Minneapolis, Minn. 
     
    Dear Mr. Horn: 
     
    Acknowledging receipt of yours of October 30th relative to the pheasant 
    experiment we are making in this State, I will say that at the present 
    time I would not like to say that it is an absolute success. We are hav-
    
    ing a five day open season this year on cock birds and we should be able
    to 
    ascertain by the end of this season our app-arent progress. However, on two
    
    or three of our refuges these birds have successfully propagated themselves
    
    in the wild state the past two years. 
     
    As soon as I have completed a report along this line and wP. are absolutely
    
    sure that this species will establish itself south of the thirty-fifth par-
    
    allel I will give you the first report on this subject. 
     
    Ve--y truly yours, 
     
     
    Curtis S. Allin, (Signed) 
     
    Publicity Director 
    KY. GA   L' AD FIS O C 0 S ISION 
     
     
    CSA: RRH 
     
     
    copied bg 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
                   KENTUCKY STA'rE FOREST SERVICE 
                          DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 
        Eugene Flowers.        LABOR and STATISTICS 
    COMMI.. "    LTURE,                                            FIRE
    CONTROL 
       LABOR AND STATISTICS           FRANKFORT                     0.Y. BELL
    
                                                                 ASSISTANT STATE
    FORESTER 
       W. E. JACKSON, JR. 
       STATE FORESTER                                               S. D. SUITER
    
                                                                   DISTRICT FORESTER
    
     
                E-C-FA-Central States 
                Forestry Congress                   October 6, 1932. 
     
     
                Mr. Aldo Leopold, Chief 
                SpDrting Arms & Ammunition 
                Manufacturers Institute 
                Madison, Wisconsin 
     
                Dear Mr. Leopold: 
     
                            The third annual meeting of the Central States 
                Forestry Congress will be held at the Brown Hotel, in 
                Louisville, Ky. on November 17, 18 and 19th. The program 
                committee has been working very hard to make this coming 
                meeting an exceptional one from the standpoint of subjects 
                presented and the speakers who present them, and I think a 
                successful meeting is assured. 
     
                            The program committee has drawn up a program 
                of subjects for discussion and this committee would like to 
                know if you would be good enough to handle the subject: 
                THE MAINTENANCE OF FOREST COVER AS A BASIS FOR WILD LIFE 
                CONSERVATIM , on the afternoon program of November 17th. I 
                might say that this first day's afternoon program will be 
                taken up entirely by considering the Maintenance of Forest 
                Cover as a Basis for Wild Life Conservation, Public Recreation,
    
                and the Place of State and National Forests in Public Recreation
    
                and Wild Life Conservation. 
     
                            We are asking Mr. L. G. Staley, State Forester of
    
                Pennsylvania and Mr. Paul G. Redington, Chief of the Biological
    
                Survey to handle the other two main subjects on this afternoon
    
                program. 
                            There are one or two other persons who will be 
                asked to discuss each one of these subjects after they are pre-
    
                sented by the mai# speakers. 
     
                            Trusting that you will accept this assignment, and
    
                will notify me as early as convenient, I am with kindesit re-
    
                gards, 
     
                                      Sincerely yours, 
     
     
    WE J: R SW 
     
     
    "LET'S KEEP KENTUCKY'S WOODS GREEN" 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Mr. W. E. Jackson, Jr. 
    Kentucky State Forwst Service 
    Frankfort+, Knu 
     
    Dear Mr. Jacksoni 
     
             I see to be out of luck in acpting the repeated 
     
     
     
    to speak at the Wisconsin Izaak Walton League Convenution 
     
    Nov. IT-1S and cannot welli break this enaeet 
     
            VIY axtremely sorry, since I would particul~arly like 
     
    to take part in thi year's meetin. I hope you will gve me 
     
    athr cance net year. All I c an di to wish yon succss. 
     
     
                               Yo~urs starely,. 
     
     
     
     
                                        A~LDO LEOPOLD 
     
     
    AL/v 
     
     
    Oct- Il. 1932 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
                                                     COMMISSIOUNE. 
                e=                                 DR.JOE W. JONES 
    ýRrnturhV  Ovtelt anbt AlisI} IQlamraisflflt0a  R DAWFSON SPRINGS,
    KY. 
                                                   DR. B. L. KEENEY 
                                                       PRINCETON, KY. 
                      Aranf                        HARLAN H. WINTERS 
                                                       ASHLAND. KY. 
     
     
                         ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO    JOHN L. TRUMBO 
                                                                  EXECUTIVE AGENT
    
                     KENTUCKY GAME AND FISH COMMISSION 
                             NOT TO INDIVIDUALS 
     
                             June 17, 1932. 
     
     
     
    Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
    905 University Avenue, 
    Madison, Wisconsin. 
     
    My dear Sir: 
     
                  Your letter of May 20th, together with Iowa Handbook 
     
    of Game Management, was duly teceived, but due to the change of 
     
    the Commission and other matters, the hand book was not brought 
     
    to my attention until today and after hastily reading it I am 
     
    mailing it to Mr, Jacob L. Crane, Jr., 916 Wrigley Building, 
     
    Chicago, Illinois. I hope this splendid report will soon be 
     
    published in order that each member of the new Commission might 
     
    have a copy, conqeding the necessity of like work in Kentucky. 
     
                  Expressing the appreciation of the Commission and 
     
    the writer for your courtesy in this matter, I am 
     
     
    JOQ :GH                       Sunt 
     
     
    tcheries. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                          May l2th, 1932 
     
     
     
     Mr.  . M. Olin, Chair7an                        Our File: 
     Committee on Restoration                         Gae 
     and I'mtection of Game. 
     
     Dear Vr, ulin: 
     
                          Game 3irvey - Kentuaky 
     
                          Referring to copies of correspondece 
     between this office and Mr. J. uincy Ward, Superintendent 
     of WiArdens and Hatcheries, Krtuoky: 
     
                          *r. Ward has acknowledged our letter of 
     the 4th Instant, and thinking you will fi,d it of interest, 
     we quote some below. 
     
                             rs ver1y truly, 
     
     
     05C :ecretary 
     
     Copy of letter dated kay 6th, from Mr. J. ýadncy Ward: 
     
     "Your letter of May 4th, '3L, in re of the Game Survey 
     granting the )entucky Game and Fish 0ommission perisaion 
     to use all or parts of 1'r. Leopold's gavu  survey has been 
     received. I wish t express to you and your associates 
     the appreciation and their gratefulness for your generosity 
     in this mitter. 
     
     "Thanking you very much for advising me th9t 'r. Leopold 
     could give the information as to fellowships etc., and 
     hope the Kentucky Commission cen see fit whn financial 
     conditions improve to undertak work of this kind." 
     
     
    Copies to Messrs. 2.:NC. Dill 
                      J. T. okellyi 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    Kay 4th, 193Z 
     
     
    ro. Jo xinoy Wrd,                        Our , 13: 
    Supt. of Ardem & Tateheries,               Game 
    Sentueky Gm   & Fish Comslasion, 
    Frun.cfort, Kentuoy. 
     
    Dear Vr.   sr*: 
                      Came SureZ- Yentacky 
     
                      oAeknoweding yous of the 030th, askn 
    for etails as to the eetablishent of a fellowship in 
    YentuOe  similar to those financed by the Institute In 
    -nnnota, Wisconsin an MXIohian: 
                      I am very glad to say that the Institute 
    woul4 have no objection whatever to your usin any portion 
    of the Game Juxrve of the Jorth Central -tates, mae by 
    1r. Leopold. You oan consi4er this amthority to extract 
    any prt of the "Om ;ýuey" which has been ooe    righted
    
    by the Institute. 
                      However, I regret to avise that the 
    !nstitute does not at the prsent time have funds available 
    that will permit of an extenion of its flow~ship plan, 
    which mkes It Impossible for us to outline terms and eoni- 
    tions as requsted by you.   It might not be amiss, however, 
    to say that other State, have established a omewhat siwi3*r 
    fellowships at their own expense. Mr. t opoem , I am sre, 
    Ir fully Inform   on these cases and you can undoubtedly 
    obtain full details by oomaunitirig direct with him. 
     
                      Regretting our inability at this time to 
    cooperate othew then to authorize the use of the "Game 
    S-urveyl, P  a ssrin you of our wishea to help to the extent 
    of our ability, we are 
     
     
    CSC: S               Seretary 
     
    Copies to M(essrs. 7.C.Dill, J.M.Olin, J.T.Skelly, *Ido Leopold. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    Ammriran (lamr Asoridation 
      "Anteiricas Oldest National Game Protective Organisation 
           INVESTMENT BUILDING,. WASHINGTON., . C. 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                                   May 2, 1932 
     
     
    Ar, J. 4Qaincey .ard 
    Kentuoky Game and Ash Coision 
    Frankfort, Ky., 
     
    4dear Quincosy 
     
                I have your If        pril      d am glad to lote, 
    tihat you think so hig     I e  14's'       of the North Cen- 
    tral States* 
                We did     a     to mae any -money on the distri- 
    bution of this volainin    fact we have spent considerably 
    more than "   a    a seI  to get out of it as so many people 
    do not seem           e      fioaoe of t.is Survey    The 
    wLotual dis     i On S  a     bemi entirely too wml. 
                is     e s-  d actually have #1.00 per copy, sines 
    you want I   copies ii  make you a special price of 90" each 
    and will-ha     ee a     d direct from tke printer. Let me k 
       yo8                t-er, 
     
                  -m m!ghty sorry to learn that your recent sesslon 
     f the legi   tur, upset the p'an aopted in 1930 to a-sure tho 
     leation o        men for the Kentucky Ge and Fish Cois ion. 
        t1e       ror will undoubtedly select fine metaking it 
     y          ye   out the plan in vogue since 1930 would undoubt- 
     sly assure lees Political turnover and far better cooperation 
     fro the spotsen 
     
                'o your legislature expeots to get a bood big up 
     standing man to devote all of his time to the Job of executive 
     officer for $2500 Ter yew is beyond me. 
     
                At first blush it would se  that the learings bfore 
    the  annte Coaitte early in -pril did not aecomplish ver much 
    but in reality a great deal was ao     alhed. You will see m 
    evaluation of those hearings In the Association's bulletin in the 
    June issue of "Field and Stream," "Sports Afield" and
    "Outdoor 
    Life"' and other magazines. 
     
     
    A 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    Atreriatn (Game Asioricathion 
      "America's Oldest National Game Protective Organization" 
           INVESTMENT BUILDING, WASHINGTON, D. C. 
     
     
    J, qinay lard 
     
     
    6/2/32 
     
     
                     The new Ad so-r Board has gotten off to a good 
    start. In the end, however, it may be nseaessar to coomi back to 
    your original sug~vstion and you can1 bank on it thet if I find 
    the Advisery Board does n1ot intend assuiung, its full shatre ofth 
    responsibility, I will sever i- oo    tion with it. Unto rtuntely 
    In 1931-the Advisory Board had very litte to du wito i toing the 
    waterfowl seassons. NOV are goiýnL to do our best to see to it that
    
    it does iiot hapren ag-,ain, 
     
     
    gone out to 
    plantor~y. 
    this kind It 
    get squarely 
     
     
         The onolosd news :ervi "eitbm which h s   rs 
    aheut M0 papes         thrguntry is .lf- 
    If th., en    C   ttez brine a     a reeondation of 
    wili be u to all of us to roi   our owndeas and 
     
     
    behind it, 
     
     
    Cordially yus 
     
     
     
     
              Pre.Fident 
     
     
    Reply 5/5: While of course I have no authority to say so, I 
    would think that the Institute could afford to make you a very 
    low rate, let us say 500, on quantity distribution of the Game 
    Survey to conservation organizations. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
    COMMISSIONERS 
     
     
                                                     COMMISSIONERS 
                i~tJ~L  'DR. JOE W. JONES 
    k'"nute nub                                       DAWSON SPRINGS, KY.
    
                                                   DR. B. L. KEENEY 
                                                       PRINCE.TON. Ky. 
                       rardifrt                   HARLAN H. WINTERS 
                                                       ASHLAND, KY. 
     
     
                                                               JOHN L. TRUMBO
    
                          ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO         EXECUTIVE AGENT
    
                       KENTUCKY GAME AND FISH COMMISSION 
                               NOT TO INDIVIDUALS 
     
                                    April 30, 1932. 
     
     
     
    Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
    905 University Avenue, 
    Madison, Wisconsin. 
     
    Dear Mr. Leopold: 
     
                        Yours of April 27th concerning the re-print 
     
    of the quail chapter of the "Game Survey" has been received, 
     
    for which accept my sincere thanks. Knowing that the Game Sur- 
     
    vey publication was being sold through the American Game, I 
     
    wrote Seth Gordon previous to the receipt of your letter, ask- 
     
    ing for a rate, and if the Commission can see this matter as I 
     
    do, I will be pleased to place a number of them with interested 
     
    sportsmen throughout the State, as I am convinced of its great 
     
    value. 
     
                        I think your second suggest an admirable one, 
     
     and I am taking this matter up with the Commission at their next 
     
     meeting and will advise you as promptly as possible of their de- 
     
     cision. 
     
                        I would appreciate a manuscript copy of the 
     
    hand-book which you have prepared for the Iowa Fish and Game Com- 
     
    mission. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
    - 2 - 
     
     
                      Trusting that I may have the pleasure of giving 
     
    you some definite information on this interesting subject in the 
    near future, I am 
                                 Sincerely and cordially yours, 
     
     
                                    t. of Wardens and Hatcheries. 
     
     
    JQW-SS 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
                                                  COMMISSIONERS 
                                               DR. JOE W, JONES 
    SAmDAWSON SPRINGS. KY. 
                                               DR. B. L. KEENEY 
                .1    ankfort                       PRtINCETON,yKY. 
                                               HARLAN H. WINTERS 
                                                   ASHLAND, KY. 
     
     
                                                                  JOHN L. TRUMBO
    
                                 ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO        EXECUTIVE
    AGENT 
                             KENTUCKY GAME AND FISH COMMISSION 
                                     NOT TO INDIVIDUALS 
     
    CY,                              April 25, 1932.               c 
     
     
     
            Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
            905 University Avenue, 
            Madison, Wisconsin. 
     
            My dear Sir: 
     
                         Under date of February 10th, '32, I wrote you ask- 
     
            ing for terms as to making a survey of the State of Kentucky with
    
     
            the attempt to determine the possibilities of successful planting
    
     
            of ring neck pheasants in Kentucky, but due to the fact that we 
     
            haven't a full Commission this subject has never been discussed 
     
            or action taken thereon. In a further reading of your splendid 
     
            report I find your chapter 2, on bobwhite quail, as set out on 
     
            pages 24 to 88, inclusive, is very interesting and would be of 
     
            great value to the quail shooters of Kentucky if they could have
    
     
            this information, and I am wondering if there is any way in which
    
     
            the Kentucky Commission can be allowed to publish this and other
    
     
            sections of your report in bulletin form. Should it be used in 
     
            that way by the Kentucky Commission we, of course, should be 
     
            delighted to cover the pamphlet with a preface giving you and 
     
            the Committee on restoration and protection full credit there- 
     
            for and making reference to your game survey. 
     
                         I would be very grateful If you would advise me of 
     
            your decision on this matter at your earliest convenience. 
     
                                              Yoi:G vure truly, 
     
            JQW: GHS                    Supt. TiWa~rdens and E  cheries. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    APrtl 21 1932 
     
     
    Weatu41 G    & 71*   seIo 
    Mr   .4&n    taokd 
    Frankfort, Xeum& 
     
    Dear Utro 'at 
     
          Yes, of cue 1    =14 be gad to have you reprit the     ail a   ter
    
    of the *Game ftra  in boullotts fom.< Toduially thecoyihisn 
    the hanms of the Institute. but I am Rattoue    they would be more ta 
    4la  to have  u use It. Just to make sure, I seninga       of you 
    letter. aM this on. to Mr. Joha M. Olin. with the        tn 
    he give you formal pemissiF) to reprint a    part of the reot o     wnt to.
    
     
          I will also be 4.a4 to furis yo any of the cuts you mny finlly 
    select. This wuld save Yo a little expene. 
     
          There a" two possible odificatinase of yor propowa whic     I
    an 
    goin to tak  the liber  of sestin    for your oaslieration. 
     
          OW is this: the Institute has a     es    st,,oor of the a.m 
    Report wch Is nt mvin wl.      Seth Gordon has bee retan1- tb 
    at $1.0*0 ea*h postpai. The migt make you a lower rate on these, If 
    yonunwnted. a quantity. If this Interests rau I wonil& %a th matter up
    
    through Seth. 
     
          The owe dsI ~estio  iets I couj4 &   the bobwite chpter to 
    ntaky co     itioas, and mak it an original lo   l   tiin of your 
    own, If I *_ld be retained for a muoth' field work plus a f     wes 
    to dio the wtiting. This is virtually what I have jus.t finished doino 
    for tha Iowa Fi  and Game 0mmisio.   I have writte for th a poar 
    (non- set anti fie) ianhlat, cledU *The Iowa TwboofGameVnget. 
    I a" sen you a mamaseipt copy of this           in a week or ten 
     
     
          My v~gestior4 in shrt ts to wrte a 'XntimyHadbo           of %g 
    ae  mmt,9 for whic  I would  e  abfmt 1-112 months total tl at 
    the rates qoteL 
     
          nother alternative wuld be a Xentuk  Hanbook o       K  sa - 
    mentw for vi1h I would need a longer tm.     It migt be wise. thm, 
    to try out the Idea on quail alone, 4 then expand. it later if it twces 
    well. 
     
          MY tie is booked solid to July 1 but after that I am at 1iberiy 
    to consider additional Jobs. 
     
     
    Yours sinctrely, 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
                                 COMMISSIONERS         V 
    ~DR. JOE W. JONES 
                                  DAWSON SPRINGS. KY. 
                               DR. B. L. KEENEY 
                                   PRINCETON, KY. 
                               HARLAN H. WINTERS 
                                   ASHLAND. KY. 
     
     
                                                              JOHN L. TRUMBO
    
                           ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO        EXECUTIVE AGENT
    
                       KENTUCKY GAME AND FISH COMMISSION 
                               NOT TO INDIVIDUALS 
     
     
                                   February 10, 1932. 
     
     
     
     
    Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
    905 University Avenue, 
    Madison, Wisconsin. 
     
    Dear Mr. Leopold: 
     
                     During the year of 1931 the Kentucky Game and 
     
    Fish Commission liberated about 1000 English ring neck pheasants 
     
    in Kentucky. They have contracted for about 10000 eggs of the 
     
    English ring neck that we will deliver to parties throughout the 
     
    State for hatching. The Kentucky Commission will purchase all 
     
    birds raised by them in a sound and healthy condition when from 
     
    ten to twelve weeks of age. After the birds are banded, the 
     
    Commission plans to liberate them throughout the State. 
     
                     I have advised the Oommission that before the 
     
    birds were liberated they make a survey of the State in order 
     
    that they might determine where conditions were most ideal for 
     
    successful planting, and, in order to do this intelligently, it 
     
    will be necessary to secure the services of a competent person. 
     
    I am, therefore, writing you to know if you would be willing to 
     
    undertake the work, and, if you are, I would thank you to give me 
     
    your terms. In the meantime the Kentucky Commission will possibly 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
    - 2 - 
     
     
    pass upon my recommendations, and if their action is favorable, I 
    will then be in a position to negotiate with you. 
                    Thanking you to advise me at your earliest conven- 
    ience, I am 
                                  Yours -ver trulyt 
     
     
                                  sup   of Wardens ýnd Hatcheries. 
     
     
    JQw-SS 
    1182 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    1*b. 22s, 93 
     
     
    btat Mwo birdt 
             Y   ltter of F       IQ 10  &w$*x -    owr  on fi eld 
    k In aRnntutio     t with the low G    , hen* the deay in 
    replying. 
             Your Proble *tew..s go 'vr Muh Vat I Infer frm yam 
    letter tat tb. wor wmd  haei to Uboe  wellM in .lvau*o .f th 
    **&so fow liboretin the yon birsw~d  preferbly in advsane of 
    th  usan fe ettin          I    m  this beuue y  wuld prbably 
    t wn    to plaen ou  in cuties wche     not to be stocked WA 
    from wih te wmmtig birds would hves to be       sA. 
             If this amtion is ewrst. thou nw  pnr   t   wag  ts 
    wou  proifit mm fn your Job. I am oblgated to wok 
    ina Iow untl April 1, after oh I m obligated by entaot to 
    sped at lesot a mnth sad a hlf a ettin ct the tIM) text for N 
    'bok ion g  nan    t  whih g    to prs this m   o., I other 
    words, I am oametoly tied up until May 15. 
             s oomuplotioa of theu O   matsI hbave   info 
    undertaning with Bill Tukr of Tos aouemin         *m   work dom 
    tbe. ud I would he   to tW  out    t   an w    Bil1 wats e 
    befoure obligating xroult uledi. It to prbbl, hosr, that 
    he ul~t b en.tirely willing to Postpon the Texs wor ~until W1, 
             I will be Uak he"s oabit Mac I and would ppw~uuito ye 
    let~tv - ko" the date ýb whto the    nma job wuld bay* to be
    
    oleitelo I will then write y  w. sx1iaitly about Us poest. 
    'bIltyv of sW undra&wtn  It. 
             Tom ask no to Indicate i  terms. I hays migt~tZ  little 
    experienue In *fat private wor of this sort should be wertho bat I 
    bay* boen thinking about a rat* of $1.200 per msonth. plus tmavl 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
    i     2 
     
     
            I tb*I coldde ~ive you -or vaus m~w an exvsg-, 
      veeI vw#-il gIv yo &m*',h f114 mar eac yea plu a cout1im 
     
    plus twm*1 .xpmms. Ibis kin of sori  ougt to vat y MA 
    up     -e meel wt a fairsae toa fe sposfte pmlm       lk thi 
    -rgu pro1e of     inaot paebt ratbr with th rf& 
    it wishe toenter ~thi MM of an        3ot   ofnt 
       m~ost- au n&vx*m.hvwr         would lik to U ote 
     
     
              Sm4ouma this Immdate job don beae I = fre 
    with Mr. W.3. Gano wb to just lamm1e tb Biologica S yt 
       ,oggis this MM of vw§  go is t.   .wos  to L. 1". Sto4dard.
    
    Be is 1ain~tenl  to settle vmw~tr Im Rlsen~a ma miU ~adBos 
    in xw mr   4 coul be       4.va t donobvs his mt propetive 
    Ovss. bor th nex tw week          n~ oudrec him In cars I. T. 
     
     
    IA his ora Capacity fs e          -AP"n mn fo . 3164fim 
    ftq, h* adi~   wit t  stateof ist or on as a"a sn 
     
     
     
     
     
                              Ious simmrs y 
     
     
    814" in Mr. LOPW OsWO 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
                 ESTUBUSHED 802 
     
    E.I.Du PONT DE NEMOURS & COMPANY 
                 INCORPORATED 
             CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT 
             WILMINGTON, DELAWARE, 
     
    GAME RESEARCH DIVISION                           March 16, 1931. 
     
     
     
     
         Mrs Aldo Leopold, 
         404 University Ave., Nat'l Bank Building, 
         Madison, Wis. 
     
         My dear Aldo - 
     
                      Henry Davis has sent on a report on the Bernheim 
         Foundation which he suggests might be of interest to you. I 
         am therefore quoting it herewith for your information and such 
         use as you can make of itt: 
     
                     "In Louisville, Ky., yesterday I contacted Mr. I. 
         Sidney Jenkins, trustee of the Isaac W. Bernheim Foundation, 
         a project which offers pospibilities in furthering the game 
         restoration movement in Kentucky. 
                     ALr. Bernheim is a retired businessman, having made 
         his millions out of I. W. Harper whiskey, and has set aside a 
         large sum of money for the creation of the Foundation, which 
         now owns a tract of 13,100 acres of cutover land near Clermont, 
         Ky., and a short distance from Louisville* It is the plan of 
         the Foundation tustees, of whom Mr, Jenkins is chairman, to 
         bring the land baok to its original state of forest primeval 
         and to restore its animal and bird life.   A museum of natural 
         history, an open-air community theatre and other buildings will 
         be erected and I have been given to understand that funds have 
         been provided for its perpetual maintenance. 
     
                     *Seven foresters are now at work on the tract, fire 
         lanes have been cut and tree planting has begun.  Mr. Jenkins is 
         especially interested in the wild life phase of the work. I have 
         suggested to him that the fire lanes be planted in game food after 
         the system employed in the Thomasville-Tallahassee and Camp Lee 
         areas. This suggestion will be carried out. 
     
                     "A covey, census this fall shows 9 covies of Mexican
    
         quail which are supposed to have sprung from 75 Mex planted last 
         spring.  The Ky. state game department has been given a 30 year 
         privilege to make the tract into a game refuge and have planted 
         some turkeys and a few deer. The Foundation is anxious to buy 
         more turkeys and deer and I have given Mr. Jenkins information 
         as to where they can be secured. 
     
     
    GAME BREEDING INFORMATION MAY BE SECURED FROM OUR GAME RESEARCH DIVISION
    
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
               *The Foundation plans to give each interested boy 
    or girl attending the Olermont High School, this spring a setting 
    of pheasant eggs, with the provision that some of the hatch will 
    be planted on the area* They also have a few other ideas but 
    are admittedly groping in the dark insofar as game is concerned. 
               "*I am trying to interest the game department of Ky. 
    in instituting a quail demonstration on this area and believe if 
    they cansee the light, funds for such a project will be forth- 
    coming from the Foundation. 
               "It strikes me that this i& an excellent opportunity
    
    to interest the Foundation in a forestry-game demonstration as 
    a contribution to science and that this contact should be follow- 
    ed up* With the whole project in the raw state and starting from 
    "Ntaw", as it were, I believe that the trustees can be interested
    
    in starting such a project which would undoubtedly be of much 
    value to the forestry-grazing-game problem. 
               NI suggest that this letter be called to Leopold's 
    attention and would apnreciate suggestions from both of you. 
    Mr. Jenkins is in a very receptive mood for information and 
    action and I am very sorry that an engagement with Governor 
    Horton of Tennessee tomorrow prevented my being able to stay 
    over another day and spend more time with him." 
     
     
     
                                  Most sincerely yours, 
     
                                     L. W. T.'Waller, Jr. 
                                     Director of Conservation. 
    LWTW/o 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    "larch 20,1931 
     
     
    Major L. W. T. Waller, Jr. 
    Director of Conservation 
    m. I. du Pont 4e Ne&qars & Coo 
    Wflmington, Telawar 
     
    Dear Major 
     
           I aw rad that Henry Davis is taking a hand with the 
    Mernhip Foundation. 
     
           I have been previously in touch wtth one of their for- 
    esters, and I aWee that it probably presents a good chance 
    to da-ionstrate some 'kin of -ame work. My knowlde of 
    Xentuchy, however, is too slim to enable me to be very snecific. 
     
           It mpht be well to go easy on the pheasants. since in 
    my opinion they are almost snre to fail In the longp rn. 
     
           If I can get a look at the property sometime I might have 
    a good many sg4estions about a fame-forestrT denonstration. 
    From a distance, however, I can hardly think of anythiw tha 
    Henry has not already thought of. 
     
     
                                 Yours sincerely, 
     
     
     
     
                                         ALI)O L',OPOLD 
                                   In Charge, Game Survey 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
             ND TO MR. ALDO LEOPOLD, Univ.Wisconsin, 421 Chemistry Bldg., 
                                     Madison, Wis. 
     
     
     
                              COPY OF LETTER TO MAJOR WALLER 
                                   FROM HENRY DAVIS 
                              from GulfportMiss,!M' 5,1930. 
     
                            CamD Knox Develooments 
        "Mr. H.J.Gates, of LouisvilleKy.,president of the Kentucky Pointer
    
    and Setter Club, is sojourning at this place for the summer. I have out-
    
    lined to him my plan, as discussed with Leopold and Heyward in Chicago, 
    and he shows much interest. 
     
         The present status of the Pointer and Setter Club's activities 
    toward the making of Camp Knox into a game sanctuary is this: 
         In the past, several attempts have been made to interest several 
    corps area commanders in the oroject. These have met with failure, the 
    commander's attitude being that the post, as is, is inadequately manned 
    and could not spare the force necessary to enforce the restrictions on 
    such a large area. The Pointer and Setter Club offered, and is still 
    willing, to provide the necessary personnel, but you can understand the 
    army's reaction to civilian assistance. In the past the camo commanders 
    have been frankly "courted" by the officials of the club, in the
    inter- 
    est of keeping the issuance of hunting permits to a minimum. These 
    tactics have, in a measure, been successful until the present commander 
    took charge. He is not a soortsman and has manifested no interest in the
    
    rifle trials or the protection of the game on the area. 
     
          At the last semi-annual meeting, which occurred recently, Judge 
    Robert W.Bingham, publisher of the Louisville Courier-Journal, who, I 
    understand, has wanted to try his hand on the matter from a political 
    angle, was given carte blanche in the project. Judge Bingham planned to 
    see General Summerall, who is his personal friend, and see if he couldn't
    
    interest the general in closing shooting on the area. He recently made 
    a trip east with the idea of going to Washington for this purpose and may
    
    or may not have returned. Mr. Gates should have a letter from Judge 
    Bingham soon, giving him General Sumerall's reaction to the project and 
    Mr. Gates has oromised to write me upon receipt of this letter. I think 
    it best to delay my activities until Judge Bingham reports. 
     
           The only approach upon General Nolen, the present corps area com-
    
    mander, was made through General Ellerbe Carter, of Louisville, adjutant
    
    general of the Kentucky National Guard, and member of the Pointer and 
    Setter Club. He showed but little interest, I understand, but it may be 
    that he did not feel particularly kindly to General Carter. The Ky Nation
    
    al Guard uses Camp Knox to stage its annual maneuvers and there may be 
    some friction between the N.G. and the regulars. 
           Mr. Gates is agreeable to the combined shooting ground-sanctuary 
     project and is also interested in the American Legion slant, altho the 
     latter proposition may be dangerous as it would bring another factor into
    
     the picture and might further complicate matters by having four inter- 
     ests represented, i.e., the Army, the National Guarrd, the American Legion
    
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
                                      -2- 
     
     
     
    and the Kentucky Pointer and Setter Club. I feel that we should keep 
    the interests of the Pointer and Setter Club paramount. 
     
              In the event that Judge Bingham's conference with Gen. 
    Sumerall should accomplish nothing, Mr. Gates is anxious that we 
    try to reach General Nolen through Col.Barney, if such an action is 
    possible. He is writing Ed Hilliard, of Louisville, who will be 
    the next oresident of the club, outlining the various projects I 
    suggested. In the meantime, I believe it best that we mark time until 
    Judge Bingham is heard from." 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
    ISAAC W. BERNHEIM FOUNDATION, INC. 
     
     
    Clermont, Ky.                                   September 20, 1929. 
     
     
    Mr. Aldo Leopold, In Charge. 
    Game Survey, 
    421 Chemistry Bldg., 
    Vniversity of Wisconsin, 
    Madison, Wis. 
     
    Dear Mr. Leopold: 
     
                     Thank you very much for your letter of the 5th 
    re our game problems here. I have not answered it before, as I 
    have been going over numerous bulletins on the subject, inclu- 
    ding Stoddard's preliminary report( 1925-1926). 
     
                     To answer some of your specific questions- The 
    ruffed grouse was originally native here, according to the na- 
    tives, but has been killed out by indiscriminate shooting both 
    in and out of season, and by annual and severe forest fires. To 
    my knowledge there are none left in this region. Pheasant- both 
    native and ring-neck- are represented by a few isolated birds, 
    whicn, are evidently left from birds released in the vicinity a 
    few years ago by one of the residents. I question if the pheas- 
    ant was ever numerous here, and I have not recommended its intro- 
    duction. I should apprecte any information you can give me on 
    the ruffed grouse. I know that it is subject to an apparent epi- 
    demic of an intestinal trouble, but the cause and control I am 
    ignorant of. 
     
                    I have submitted a preliminary report on game 
    goods and stocking to the directors, in which I recommended the 
    introduction of ruffed grouse and wild turkey, and of deer and 
    black bear. I also stated that, in my opinion, there was no need 
    at present, of planting additional game bird foods, since there 
    was an abundant supply on the forest at present, blt that our 
    problem was one in forest mana6emeqt- in so regulating our land 
    use that we insured the retention of open and semi-open areas 
    scattered thruout the area of the preserve, and the growt) of 
    the present food plants. I also stressed the necessity of pred- 
    ator contrdl- and of a preliminary biological survey of the whole 
    tract by a competent naturalist familiar witn the flora and fauna 
    if Kentucky. I would appreciate your suggestions on a man qual- 
    ified and available to make such a survey for us. I have also 
    written the University of Kentucky for sagestions. 
     
                      In regard to -our question on the possibility 
     of the Foundation engaging in game research, I assure you that 
     as far as I plersonally am concerned, I shall do all I can to 
     get such a program approved by the directors. I have already 
     recommended , in my "Report on a Program of Development", that
    
     the Foundation make one of its primary functions the practice of 
     research in all phases of forest practice-;hich would surely in- 
     clude Fame research. I feel that in the line of research, pro- 
     perly conducted, would lie,perhaps, the greatest benefit :f the 
     Foundation. There is to oe a meeting of the corporation in 
     Louisville on October 4h, and at that time I hope that we can 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
    Leopold- 2. 
     
     
    come to a definite undterstanding on the scpe and extent of our 
    work, at least for the first few years. 
     
          Re the nearest scientific institution at which laboratory 
    servicd and scientific advice would be available- I presume the 
    University of Kentucky at Lexington would the cloeest. This is 
    about 80 miles from Clermont. It may be possible to arrange for 
    slch work at the University of Louisville, which is onlj 25 miles 
    from here. Still another possibility- is Berea College, at Berea, 
    Ky., also about 80 miles from nere. This colle~e, the largest in 
    the state, has a facultr rankin very high professioaally, and 
    is at )r.sent cooperating with the Appalachian Forest Experiment 
    Station of the Service in its research program. Kr. 3. H. Mayfield, 
    head of the ""cience Deptrtments of the collese,is now doirl2 grad-
    
    uate work at the University of CGi-caco, so I do not know just who 
    is in ciarge there at present. 
     
          I have written Mr. Stoddard re ther work here, and expect to 
    hear from ,im shortly. Sheldon, Acting-Chief of the Biolo1ic-l 
    Survey, Las sent me nuT;ierous bulletins, and has also written me 
    In regard to tne' work. With suc, an abundance of advice from you 
    and the others I should be able to wor'k ou+t te problems satis- 
    factorily. 
     
          I st11l am hipping to see you shortly, and would appreciate 
    any information and assistance you can render. I shall write -oi 
    again after the annual meetin: of the corporation, re the deci- 
    sion, if any, on the question of the Foundation engaajin~g in re- 
    search. 
     
     
                                Very sincerely, 
     
     
     
                                  Ronald B;. CraiG, 
                                         Fore ster. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    421 CheBitr   u11-i-r: 
     
     
                                         $eptem~er 2, 1929 
     
     
    Mr. Rol4 -. Crnlg  Forter 
     
     
    flear M~r. Cii: 
     
            I 7-s Inter ted in yxr letter of   retnber 2c, e- 
    eeialy to 1o that then ts    IThly e certive attitude 
    on the Frt of the tFi~t~a for te    r:itiatin of rerch on 
      ~.o1rt~t. T ~ej~     a4~    otit     t, tel , O1&d 
    n~out you" ven~t; r . han  i 43r  wtith me thint thre botentia     
      \ 
        usfune~~feu~a tr et i's Lre-,ter Inthe .74r-ctlori of re 
    eeerch then in   other lirctlou 
           I w!d heIt te hoover, to have you ,reset thie 
    idea t te diectret in -btr'e  t1.rthen concrete fo) 
    TIe ---r~t ofger~~,lk         ny oterh, liesý a- 
    together in the reflctin of conf  rte poetet   feasible of exe- 
    C-Ition on the tr'. td w   Ith the f-  r) lrzecli.  T   procesE 
    iS >at I can not~ very well he~r y~n or  ii. Stodderd i 
    be i thr So  ýh late tiz f>dll  an  if I -   you I  l-ull keep
    
    aftr him to  et hýIm to visit yu on the V ro   *d.  I b   no 
    imeqdlte protýct of ;ettIr- Soutb. 
     
           1ith beet wishes, 
     
                             Tourv sincerell, 
     
     
                             AlZO MO0OLD 
                               In Ma aam. I ý!- : 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
    ISAAC W. BERNHEIM FOUNDATION, INC. 
     
     
    Clermont, Ky.                                  September 2, 1929. 
     
    Mr. Aldo Leopold, 
    University of Wisconsin, 
    Madison, Wisconsin. 
     
    Dear Sir: 
     
              At the suggestion of Mr. E. F. MeCarthy, I am writing 
    to you re our plans for developing this Forest. I enclose a copy 
    of that portion of the charter of incorporation dealing with the 
    purposes of the corporation. 
     
              The I. W. Bernheim Foundation has acquired a tract of 
    13,100 acres in Bullitt and Nelson Counties, Kentucky, about 25 
    miles south of Louisville, on the Springfield brancri of the 
    Louisville & Nashville Railroad. A good description of the tract 
    is contained in the August 26th issue of the Service Bulletin, to 
    which you no doubt have access. 
     
              As you will see from the charter, one of the fundamen- 
    tal purposes of the corporation is the establishme t and maintain- 
    ance of a large game panctuary of the species originally indigen- 
    ous to this state. To accomplish this purpose, we must, of course, 
    restock with those species now entirely gone, or now very rare, as 
    well as protecting those still remaining. Our plans, to date, cAll 
    for putting in ruffed grouse and wild turkey to augment the already 
    abundant quail; also deer and black bear. Coon, skunk, fox, and rab- 
    bit are at present quite plentiful, as well as mink and weasel. The 
    latter, and some of the foxes, will have to be thinned out, I be- 
    lieve, if we stock with game birds. 
     
              The question has arisen of the necessity of planting food- 
    stuffs for the game birds. In looking over a list of plants suita- 
    ble for Upland Game birds, which list was prepared by the Wiscon- 
    sin Aquatic Nurseries, I noted that of the 23 trees, shrubs, and 
    ,.erbaceous plants listed, all but four were native to the Forest, 
    and of those four, two would not grow here. I amof the opinion 
    that, with adequate fire protection, there will be no necessity of 
    such planting. This is also Mr. McCarthy's idea. I should like 
    your advice along these lines. There are about 1000 acres of open 
    land on t..e Forest, nowin most part, reverting to forest. The 
    remainder is in mixed hardwood, with scattered areas of red cedar 
    and virginia pine, all of which is second or third 6rdwth, and 
    in some cases, little more tian a brush type. The latter areas are 
    usually contiguous with open fields and would serve admirably for 
    game birds. This brush type consists of black locust, sassafras, 
    scarlet oak, pignut hickory, s'umac, and various species of Rubus, 
    Orategus, and Pru. 
     
              Mr. McCarthy suzgests that it may be possible for you 
    to paV us a visit either this fall or winter or next spring, and 
    go over the ground in more detail. I assure you that we should be 
    delighted to have you do so, and we will see that you have a pleas- 
    ant visit. If you can arrange it, please let us know in order that 
    we may make suitable arrangements.   I have also invited Mr. Reding- 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
    ton of the Biological Survey to visit us, if possible. I sincerely 
    hope you both can arrange to do so. 
             I would appreciate any iuSgestions you uan offer along the 
     line of game protection and propagation, or any souces of such in- 
     formation you know of that are available. If you can do so, I would 
     appreciate your opinion of the Wisconsin Aquatic Nurseries and of 
     their Mr. Coon, who has suggested his services for a survey of the 
     Forest with a view to advising us on necessary plantings of same 
     foods, etc. 
            Thank you f or any help you can render us. 
     
                                   Yours very truly, 
                              ISAAC W. BERNHEIM FOUNDATION, INC. 
     
     
    Encl.                             Ronald B. Craig, Forester. 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
           Purposes of Incorporation of I. 71. Bernreim Foundation. 
     
     
             The purposes for which this corporation is formed are 
    as follows: 
     
             1. To afford means for further development in the peo- 
    ple of Kentucky !- k    #- of love for the beautiful in natural 
    life and for kindred educational subjects, and to strengthen their 
    love and devition to the State of Kentucky and the United States, 
    and the institutions 'vich have rade possible the develcyme .t 
    thereof. 
             2. To establish and. permanently maintain an arboretum 
    and herbarium for the raisin&, of trees and shrubs and to distri- 
    bute such lrees and. shrubs, free of clarge, thruou' the State of 
    Kentunkly -   to add. to the beautification of tie parks and pub- 
    lic places of the Statee-ond, to aid in the forestation and *efores- 
    tation bf the lands of the State of Kentuc.y. 
     
             3. To )rovide a sacred sanctuary for the non-destructive 
    wild. birds and wild animal life, in order that their exjinction 
    may be prevented. 
     
     
    (Provision is a-iso made for the est blishment of x.x art and science 
    museums, but no such development is at present contemplated.-) 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
    Fi1e                        Copies to Stoddard 
                                         McCarthy 
                                         01 in 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     low  W.        FO"'=        0 
     Clermnt, Kenuck 
     
     Dear Ut. CraW 
     
     
     describing you problem o the Bsbl trant. 
     
              I tbizl% yo hmd bebteW Mý up yormn       obgnwt 
     tbhat spelic advice an the mangeen of you C~ Is gon        to be 
     hardto est. 
                 Th  mos reibeadAnatlfruin-ill be on 
     
     I )hsl already writta yov        41a dificuly will dubtlese be to 
     hold yemr quail afte cultivation hs osed and the old "ields b* 
     gintorevet t  forest. whuthis, cu*yuwl        obls     w 
     to pu In food pathe*4 After yo     re  the Stour     4bul etn 
     r woa   -ak up with       41drar in~ the problms that zineMi eloud 
     In ynur mind. 
     
              IO uor thsr  is reltivel little infrmtion, but the 
     pro'blem Is esyq. ?or y7m set~     of the oiutry I would ronvsId 
     the boot ntboriti to be Clinton 0. Smith, ?..t Superisor, Mhmus, 
     Tenn. Sinc there is Eret wvtratia geogapialJiy in the ft~na of 
     whittai da.w I wml  sunet that you op'xmt the etk7dr 
     "as cosel as poesible in Meooir you plating stock.   rassibly that
    
     inthe ?-IxghGam Preserv, v*leh Mr. Smith ea tell yuo, abau$. Will 
     be the moat suit~blo. 
     
              As to tuf7. theýý, isa uoreia~ble autbority that
    I 7 o 
     of *h reall wi erta.4s ma  m  t   Stoddard had a go-4 Wtrm 
     an his ,eoris land and to the best mnI ca    thiz~ of,   aiuýsi I
    sul 
     k:#it thit y~u get as #oAt to -,Ar native satook as yotý can..Te
     is 
       som  exes st-gsk on the WItshits Gs  Preserv, Oklabma, eM of cou.S 
     -,An g5 fase carry stook, although I do nit kný)vwho has the Prs
    
     stock. Most of it is mixo with the (lmotiz tuky      *iah of cors 
     vn# 4.rvovs  fran th  aouhwestmr.sbpce.YuhAOAget-,d 
     tage In having a tract really laqge Onav  to hol wild tuky      Hrm 
     again t" planting of taM4 pstches W be necesarya. Ia Madling yo 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
    2 
     
     
     
    forest thr will be cert.ai pr~mtions advisalaeg .wh as 1.avin        nnt*
    
    trees   Jtgt   ~t isth  definition. of a yoost tft  in your state I d 
    not  w. but 544A       8It be abl*Se to yo    It will be Wo esa to 
    watch the poibilitis of 4disa    tramisukn by dAmt     trky 
     
               In the e,)ntrol of proeitars StMdJArf is .aian by a*11 soame ths
    
    boot auhriy    both as to whst roos c*oatrol and 'howt. effect L t. 
     
               I a not uryri4    that you fIn mt of the foo4 trsst, .hb, 
    aMshere ,lwe..   Indgns in you     prery. My       h is that yr ptob. 
    lom w111 be not the Introdiwti~z of thou* pl.ato but their tenunfsn 
    throug the skillful handling of your 1aa4. Just which ones are rtatl y is.
    
    portent to a problem you will probably havs to figure out for yijurself ly
    
    first hand observtio.a 
     
              Are all of you native ruffed gues, gone? Wove they or~iginll 
    Indigenous on this FpawScular tin~t? This bird you will find mre ofa 
    mystery thmanyw of the other spool.., parSticularly with repyeot to its q.rý
    
    eli. flactAtiosns  Posibly I can tell you ab=t th*u as well a. aqbo 
    ese.   If ymr bird are on   your beat 3our  of stock Is to Pisg    G 
    Prsev but you my ha. to wait for a high point on the cycle before 
    th  ea c g et you an. I md~ertand thitt ruffed etoua it appt.roahing 
    hl~gh point t. that .ontqy now, so do not writ too low,,  4,riln Clinton
    
    Smith can adiso eyu as to possible staok. 
     
               In respose to ya   jusetlin. as near a4 I kafw the Ascs'isla 
    Aqutic Nursteries ave entirely reliable. Clyde B. Terrell of Oshkosh op 
    orates a similar institntion nd oals In uandplants.        I think both of
    
    Shoe. outfIts are jst gttin  stqrte4 in this field. 
     
              As to visitin you  trat, I cqnnat forsts 9 opeplfic )ppo% 
    tun~ty bat I shall cortainly kspor it In .tai  And tis t'hIiw wo-ald Interest
    
      megre~tly. Co3z back at ms vith your questions after you haws read this
    
    letter.  I a  edn    a coo~ if this to Ur. Mo~artI.bynd al so to Stoddard
    
     
              Is the         T          so a or izeda  f Ina dth    it 
    could support ePa rese-rob w*r an the 3semleia tr-At? If to, its *pporý
    
    tumity for useful service wo  be very CrýA   Tae tu~ys, for Insanet.
    
    I do not  ow of a sin   fNpat of strie;    fao.findig w     wich bas 
    boon don to lay a foudt ion for the tremsaously ixPortant Job of 
    onseratio     N.othing to om about its Liseos, its foods Its uant 
    aiwa les, Its nosting halbit%, or the other -,watias fnaetlt        aae 
    -nent, Tn this coansotions I woul like So a*i *ant is the Pn.F-rst .eioatt-
    
    -tic Iinstituti-in at which 1.,boratoqy service and soieatific ailvloe would
    be 
    1obtskie4. If tbere s toay bs   of 4.5mg resesrelh work on y~ya  land I kow
    
    t'hat my outfit would be interested In co~perattingl every way postibis,
    
    AndA I    usgie thAt Mr. C£tlddn arl M. "d boT-i4ti~ n "rald,
    fool "iht awn" wa 
    with re&,d to the )iological Suvy   Your tract could be the proing 
    gSwad on *hieb SW. CoastwvALkn 10p~aSte      of sstck     ould work out Its
    
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    lot usb all .1a~   disuse 
     
     
    A-= =PO1y, 
     
     
    Uo 
     
     
    3 
     
      
    
    				
          
          
    				
    				
      drers are now employed who devote 
    their entire time to speaking at pub- 
    lic meetings on Maryland's wild-life 
              resouces.Dr. C:ý 
                      ______of the 
    resources.         NOMIN       TE'l      Dr. the 
                                          C as wbeer 
    SPORTSMEN TO                            ork of 
                           iiORSlE TOof that st 
                                           Dr. Jan M 
           FOR STATE COMMISSION            drowned L 
                                           Game Prot 
                                           vice. 
    Kentucky Game and Fish Ad-               Among i 
       ministration to Be Directed         uance of 
       By   Sportsmen's    Organiza-       on whicr 
                                           done dur 
       tions--First State to Enact         bureau- 
       Such a Law.                         study of 
                                           fish. Eý 
                                           migrat! 
                                             R~ou 
      Hereafter the organized sportsmen of includ 
    Kentucky will have a voice in the se-   condiF 
    lection of members of the state game    ponddi 
    and fish commission. By the terms of   sanit 
    an act passed by the recent legis-       the 
     
     
    lature tne memoersmp of We c*ir-uu- 
    sion has been increased from four to 
    five, appointments to be made by -the 
    governor from a list of six names to be 
    recommended to him by the Izaak 
    Walton League of the state, the Ken- 
    tucky Fox Hunters' association and the 
    Kentucky Game and Fish Protective 
    association. 
      One member is to be appointed at 
    once, two on June 12 and the other 
    two at the expiration of the terms of 
    two  of the present commissioners, 
    Messrs. W. H. Fields and T. B. Watts, 
    in June, 1932. In case the associations 
    named in the law make no recommen- 
    dations the governor is authorized to 
    make the appointments without. The 
    terms of the commissioners are to be 
     
     
      I 
    br( 
    te. 
    at 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
                                                               File Ken tucky
    
     
     
      Zztincts fro  T   Grou" end. wild. Tuky of t'h* United Sttit,% a.
    Thir 
     
             ?.D. 
     
     
                                T" PWIX aafu.n 
     
                             (Tupnuhumowrieava.) 
     
             Teprairi hsz  or 'prairlo oh'cos   labaits the wester pririe* 
      fro lissitobe to mývthernT&    i Lola      an  fro Ohio to 
    erka 
      The 'birds f southern Nzs ad. -olau    ar   nllsw and. dsrxe tu   the 
      comam 'bird. 
     
     
           In -wao  prairi hens roost on the ground in a tami covey, as does
    
      the ItýWi0 but iA winter,, in many seat iý)as they roos~t
    in tins.   In the 
      fall teea covey c0QCZ5(8t In a p~k     after the ta~zian of ptarmigans
    an& 
      crested quail. Prf.F.I,. L. DeSal Infrm  tbe writer tha~t at Ams ~vdr 
      La  the *oav) *ightie  he rquot~    found. Vpks nua~rIV4 as man as a thous
    
      sand. 'birds* and that they habitv1lly toostod. in the lon gr**  bri  sloWhs.
    
      Th  prail hen is migrtory in the northern part of its rug, and to a cerai
    
      extent t.,rthor wmth ales. IN& usoll-kno authority on migtiýA,
    Prof. W. W. 
     
     
           In Xivfter and. ~Oteewe Ian* flocks of praliri chicken* om trom nartht
    
             era   soa*d. *etthern Vinnesoeta to settle for the *Inter in uorthemn
    Vises. 
           ouri and. sothers Ioav. This mimtI.,n wanres in 1balk with the **verity
    S 
           the wintar. 
     
     
     
           Th evtlnwti,ý In which the bird is held. my he M.1lixs4 twosr
    the faxt 
      that in 1002 the mupply at tfo r-z3 to 5 a- braceanowher met the deww.
    
     
     
     
     
     
           So rol ut ;t ocasio)aslly is it to fly thpt It can hardly be out,
    up, and 
      ?r~fossor   ~e~  ,Infom the wrter tlwt ~sevra tie whi*le hunting i northern
    
      Vimeosots he saw a point izW do  Jup nd. apto* throefourths gr~w     ;aiw4
    hen 
     
     
     
           At the beginm1r of the ninteenth centary the -prairie hen was extremly
    
    SalvmAnt thmrhtout Ohiý vnd. Zntuak. It ts now rwoe in both statea,
    A pert 
      of the grva  It 1has lost in the Lost It ha, Coinedty *a "etird. and
    northward 
      movenat. It hias tellowed. the grain field~s of the pýiooee# of
    the j~ain, avid. 
      with the vxtensi,)n of Cmin cultur into Minnesota and Manitoab it h&"
    hecon 
      plentifu  thin.   Accoring to Dr. Eatch it was by no mans common *e*a the
    
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
    Xztrstg frm ..w#ass & Wi1d T~rkse Of the VS1' 
     
     
       P.12 
     
       i~to -en first ca*to Mi1eeota, sad he wqs that in Illainoi as lat* a*s1036
    
       a but~rw m ~extreel luck   if he could be a doze  is a day  r-s yearAs
    lte 
       wit =h less off 4rt, oe c-)u av M swhot V. in. sda, end there wer Msvo?
     of 
       100 toa Slgi~le A* 
          Whe feintr statu  of the bird In tb Ust io well indisnts4d byAdl~ 
      classic obsarvstl~n at Ien~osrsn 4y,, in 1410. Avab~b  *;,ye 
     
               In thoe  4sys durio the winter~ fthe vu would enter  the fm 
           yar and foe& with the poultry, slight 4a the houses orwalk In
    the 
           very street* of the viUlws5. I ro~leaet baying caugt seorl in 
           a statble ot 1ýsndrs". wher the had t5Uloed so    14 'Al
     ufes In 
           the tous, of the -sa winter, a frio" of min *. who wtoM 1n if
    
           ticiwg rifl shoting  tileda154     of forty In .)o aoning  bu 
           picked no  of tbm aN  so satited with Grous wat be, ms well as *vr
    
           inheto of hit ftily. My ow  servans preform4 the faittesxt fliteb
    of 
           bacn to their flesh, and not unfroqwnty laid ti- asibo a. uf it for
    
             **-*ng.0 # * They could not hav been sold at moro than a* cent 
           apiese. *  0 # So MrSr br    they ocw   in the mK-ts of 1hlsdl*-1hki
    
           New York en4 bost.u th-t thery se1l at tt= five to ten dollar* the
    pai. 
     
     
        Ao- So tar as the siort&7 is to        theersi   VApvairie hen Is
    now ext inst 1* 
    ftKatua.T 
     
     
           Throuh its apemti-n the sale of the p.ýniwie 'men wxýs
    1irtaaliy steppe4 
      in 1~e)2 and 1r,3 in all the large aities of the Lai%%. 
     
     
     
      1, 13 
     
           X.. A. Nelsin infors th writer that In the e,%rly wut iet In northwe.ster
    
      Mlina's the fsrints in many pl:acs burned the pratrits Vi srin after the
    
      praure hens aosted, and of ten ge~thoed for household use large numbers
    of thes 
     
     
           The pr.iru1 hen has the *hvAtC~ek, hoewv, of yioldliC -Aer roAlly
    to 
      4esotticati<)n then the bobvhto, .84d ktts4n effoýrts 4~l be
    --na to establish 
      protiers of damestto,,te4 birds tor ro..tocking country * the srcis is
    e e. 
      tinot. S...szful snterprioa of this kiMd veiul be pnfttabi.    h-tsc 
        d-mstioation is -:,ssiblo and even fensibl*., the spp-,4ded quot-t ion
    frmAubo 
      implies$ 
     
                The Pinn-te Onu   Is easily tsd sand en-sil krept. It also bineds
    in 
           conf inent, and I Mis ttsa felt surpised th,?t it has not been fairly
    
           dstimote&tot  While it Ronerson I rnrease   sixty olive,, that
    "re as,. 
           prtsuly cagtfor - within twelve *11..x of th):t viliago, anM brraht
    ina 
           bag laid ncrwom the bw>,c of a hors*. I cut the tips of their win's,,
    sand 
           Vrtwd them loose, in a gadan reM orchard abont fontr Acret In *xtnt.
     Within 
     
      
    
    					
    				
    				
     
     
    IxtraOts from Oa've & 1114 Tuke   of the V. .** 
     
      .13 
     
             a wee they bieso  tome n. g  to al1.w me to4 poa    the withVAt
    
             their being frightened.  *   * 0 I the cuso of the winter they 
             be6am  go gentle as to food fro the n~d of aW wife and wnikv atb>u
    
             the Carden like t. =my twu fowwN minling occaeionu4y with the 
             4aosti   poty     v *   P Ie   spring retured they strutted #tooted,'
    
             aMn fi~ht,, n. if in the wild* *ior they hj received their 'birth.
    
             MAn  lai ogr., aMd a good nber of y,)r  on   R.4  their a  ~  w
    
     
     
     
     
     
                  fro October to A~pril, Inclsiei, %he prairi hoa tohes little
    
             bnt vvC-tF--. food. This *lemeat eamnte to 93. q per tent for the
    
             year. 7ruit ...etitutes 11.71 poc~t   loxvss floose, &ad shoots,
    
             25,O9 -ýma-Ot; ***d, 14.4 Fnbsett grain 31.06 percet, mu
    aiscefl- 
     
     
     
                  Th paiuis hen eants a mwh aslo    proporion -f &coda# with
    t 
             evep~ti~a of grwtIn, than the 'boiv*te, PaM ia this reel-act is
    laee 
             Esofal thean the latter bi*4. It too hliever, a better weederV tuma
    q