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Visual display of the A lecture and demonstration lesson on tone given by Shin'ichi Suzuki at the American Suzuki Institute, Stevens Point, WI., August, 1976

A lecture and demonstration lesson on tone given by Shin'ichi Suzuki at the American Suzuki Institute, Stevens Point, WI., August, 1976

  • August 1976
Stevens Point, Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin--Stevens Point Telecommunications for the American Suzuki Talent Education Center
  • This is a condensation of lectures and lessons recorded at the 1976 Summer Institute at the University of WI.--Stevens Point. Part II: Dr. Suzuki discusses various timbres produced by bowing in different areas. Various timbres can be produced by bowing in different regions between the bridge and fingerboard. The bow can draw out soft tones near the fingerboard or deep and vibrant sounds towards the bridge. Dr. Suzuki calls these areas Tone Color Highways. Students are taught how to control and change highways by drawing the bow across the appropriate spot on the string. To project deep tone quality, one should play on the Kreisler Highway, the region which is one-half inch away from the bridge. It is suggested that students watch the tip of the bow to remain within this highway. A relaxed bow hand is also necessary for best results. In this tape, Dr. Suzuki describes two places on the string where one can produce harmonics--soft harmonics are played by the fingerboard, loud ones are played next to the bridge. Keeping an even tone necessitates drawing a straight bow. The volume should be the same as regular notes and is achieved by applying constant power from the frog to the tip. A test for straight and powerful bow stroke is checking if the harmonic continues to sound after lifting the played finger. There are three kinds of tone noted by Suzuki--Slip, Push, and Nice. Slip Tone is attributed to sideways elbow movement. Push Tone is caused by pressing down with the index finger and tipped hand. Both of these tones are undesirable. Nice Tone is equivalent to the pure sound of a plucked note, rich and vibrant, and is accomplished by allowing the weight of the bow arm to relax into the string. Dr. Suzuki tells students to place the bow onto the string and play into the string as if traversing a half-circle, using the elastic power of the horsehair instead of the bow stick.

Publication Details

Date
August 1976
Publisher
Stevens Point, Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin--Stevens Point Telecommunications for the American Suzuki Talent Education Center
Language
English
Description of Original
2 videocassettes (ca. 120 min.) : sd., col., 3/4 in.
For Staff
METS