Visual display of the Aldo Leopold papers : 9/25/10-5 : Research Areas and Projects

				
Table 1 - Comparison between the 1939 and the 
19398 landscape at Faville Grove 
Per cent in     Per cent in 
Te                             183             193 
Oak openings                                         2 
Prairies                           -4                9 
Ts                                  11               1 
Acid bogs                            3          p05 
Sloughs and potholes                 2               1.5** 
Forests                              1               3 
Thickets                             1                * 
Agricultural land                   0              80** 
100             100 
*Gra,ee 
*Partily grazed 
A 
+  ++ ++ + + ++ +  'N 
++++ k 
++  *  * +         .  *++ +++ .N+               N 
+++ + +  +  +++  ++   +  i + il. .. . . ..... ..  . ...... 
+ i    ++  ++ ++  ++'+++  +++>++++  + +  *+++++   ** +  +  ++++ +  ++
+  ......  ++     +  + ++N  N++ + 
...N                                                                    
   N + ++++ +   +  ++  ++  + +    + + :   5! + 
+  +++  +5+++++  +++ ++ ++++  + +  ++  +++ . ...+  +  + * + . .    .. ...
..*++  +++++  . ..++ N'++++N+ 
+++...    : +++ :++   ++  +   ++ +++   - ++++++   ++  +  +++  + + ++++p+
 ++++++'N'  N  " 
++ +        +  : + + +: s + + : +    + + +  +  + +    + +   u +  +  +  +++
 * +  ++ + + ++ + : +: ++  +   + ++NN K@   + 3+f      N 
N+/+  N+>  N+5+  *  ,                                N'N'*+>+ -  +
 +++  + +  ++++  +  + ++++  ++  +   2 > ++  × 
4  N                                'N                'NN  +++  N  - 
NN'                   .......            N NNNN .....    'N'++ '+ +++ 
 
 

					
				
					
Fire is at least a partial answer. Large upland prairies lie to the 
west of Faville Grove. Periodically these prairies burned, and the fires

swept unchecked until stopped by natural barriers. The Crawfish River flows

at right angles to the prevailing westerly winds of the fire season; hee
n 
formed a natural barrier (         ). 
Of the tree species indigenous to this region, only mature oaks can witbr-

stand the heat of a prairie fire. Evidently this characteristic accounted

for the original establishment of oak openings. The role of fire can be de-

oak 
duced from -uerous/openings which have been protected against fire. These

fire-protected areas are of three types, (1) east sides of north-south 
streams, (2) "islands" which were never burned because of surrounding
fire- 
barriers, (3) areas which once burned but have been fire-free for nearly
a 
century. 
The forests east of the Crawfish seem to owe their existence to the fire

barrier presented by the river. Dr. John T. Curtis has found a similar 
forest along the east banks of the Rock and Fox rivers. Both have openings

on their west banks. 
Farmer's Island (see F1_4 ,) and Eagle Island (near Rook Lake) aeforests

which lay-west of the river, and hence in the path of prairie fires, but
te 
former was protected by a tamarack swamp, and the latter by a swamp and lake.

Both have the rich forestA characteristic of the east bank of the Crawfish.

Certain species found east of the river are lacking, however. One of these,

wahoo (       s),is extremely palatable to deer and rabbits andmasy have
been 
eliminated by over-browsing          heavy concent rations of gea 
4 Isd after fire had removed food from the surrouding area. The abse 
of another, prickly ash (hnthoxlum) can not be explained bn go     sof  
 e 
e.                      ..). 
...