Visual display of the

				
THE LIBRARY LOG

Waterworks
Butler, R. A., and Jordan, F. C. Funding
sanitary improvements as a means of in-
creasing water consumption. Amer. wa-
ter works assn. jour. Dec. 1917.   481197
In order to increase the consumption of water
and to improve sanitary conditions by small prop-
erties, these authors recommend a system by
which such improvements may be paid for on the
installment plan.
Day, Leonard A. Improved efficiency of
the St. Louis pumping stations. Amer.
water works assn. jour. Dec. 1917. 481Sa2i
Machen, Henry B. Thawing frozen service
connections by means of electric current.
Amer. water works assn. jour. Dec. 1917.
481.3M 18
McMane, W. I.      Thawing    frozen  water
mains and service pipes by electricity.

Amer. water works assn. jour. Dec. 1917.
481.3M22
Women-Employment
Bullard, W. Irving. Women's work in war
time. Boston, 1917. 85p.
Workmens Homes
Feis, Paul L. Cleveland homes company:
plan for housing Cleveland's workers.
Cleve. 1917. 9p.            331.835F32
Hamlin, Winthrop A. Low-cost cottage
construction in America: study based on
the housing collection in the Harvard so-
cial museum.   Cambridge, Mass. 1917.
30p. (Harvard university-Dept. of so-
cial ethics, pub. no 7.)   331.835H18

WHAT SOLDIERS READ

OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Washington, D. C., Jan. 26, 1918.
Records kept of reading matter furnished
to the enlisted men by the camp libraries
established by the American Library Asso-
ciation are not only interesting as answering
the question, what soldiers read, but signifi-
cant of purposes animating America's army
of democracy.
In one day's issue of books by the Amer-
ican Library Association camp library at
Camp Meade, the following subjects were
reported: French history, mechanics, topog-
raphy, and strategy in war, self-propelled
vehicles, hand grenades, field entrenchments,
bridges, chemistry, physics, astronomy,
geology, hydraulics, electricity, mediaeval
history, calculus, civil engineering, geog-
raphy, American history, surveying, mate-
rials of construction, general history, ma-
sonry, concrete. About three-quarters of the
books taken out were non-fiction.
Titles picked at random from one page of
a report from the American library Asso-
ciation camp library at Camp Sherman in-
clude: George Ade's "The Girl Proposi-
tion," Jack London's "Burning Daylight,"
Tolstoi's "Anna Karenina," H. G. Wells'
"The Soul of a Bishop," Ellis' "Plattsburg
Manual," Meadowcroft's "A. B. C. of Elec-
tricity,"  Zerbe's  "Aeroplanes,"  Haweis'
"Music and Morals," Guizot's "History of
Civilization in Europe," Carlyle's "French
Revolution," Wells' "Italy, France and
Britain at War," and Gerard's "Four Years
in Germany."
Some of the men coming to the camp

libraries seem to be having their first experi-
ence of the possibilities of the world of
books. Others of the men apparently are
taking advantage of the opportunity of
catching up on some of the reading that,
postponed until now, is made possible to
them. Boswell's "Life of Johnson," Berg-
son's "Creative Evolution," and Gibbon's
"Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire,"
are among titles noted in the soldiers' read-
ing. Among the men a number are follow-
ing various branches of English literature
ttnder the direction of the camp librarian.
Two general classes of reading are shown
by the reports from the camp librarians. One
of them is recreational, and causes demand
for fiction, poetry, and drama. The other
is informational and causes demand for
books dealing with the numerous aspects
of military science, including artillery, avia-
tion, signaling, technique of drilling, elec-
tricity, mechanical and civil engineering,
transportation, diet, foodstuffs, roadmaking,
care of horses, making and repairing equip-
ment, and other topics relating to the pres-
ent business of the men, namely, war. In
addition, there is much reading dealing with
farming, trades, occupations, and the forms
of activity which engaged the men before
they went into camp. There is much inter-
est in the study of French, and particularly
so in histories and descriptions of France.
Books dealing with the war, its cause-, and
the issues involved, and narratives of per-
sonal experiences in the war, are greatly in
demand.

14



					
				
					
THE LIBRARY LOG

I DIRECTORY Imm

MILWAUKEE PUBLIC LIBRARY
Library Hours, Central Library and
City Branches, 8:30 A. M. to 9 P. M.
Central Library open on Sunday, 1:30
to 5 P. M., from October 1 to May 1.
Board of Trustees
William I. Greene, Pres.
William Kaumheimer, Vice-Pres.
Victor L. Berger
Emil Seidel
John Doerfier, jr.
William Lindsay
Milton C. Potter
William L. Pieplow
George C. Nuesse
Librarian and Secretary, Chas. E.
McLenegan.
City Branch Libraries
South Division..........Fifth and Madison
Llewellyn...............Russell and  Lenox
Lisbon...................3215  Lisbon  Ave.
Third  Street.................911  Third  St.
Lapham................Eighth  and  W alnut
Detroit................Jackson  and  Detroit
West Division..........Prairie and 22d St.
North Avenue..........North and 16th St.
East Division..........North and Farwell
Municipal Reference............City Hall
Social Center Branches
Clarke  Street School...............28th  St.
Fourteenth Street School.......Galena St.
Forest Home Avenue School... Tenth Ave.
Public Stations
Daily Delivery by Automobile
"A.....................4623 Lisbon Ave.
"B.......................607 Jackson St.
"C".........................1410 23d St.
"E...........................45 35th St.
"F".................1412 Green Bay Ave.
"G"...................850 National Ave.
"H.....................608 Downer Ave.
Deposit Libraries
For use of the institution only
Chain Belt Company.............736 Park
Holeproof Hosiery Co........57-59 4th St.
International Harvester...........784 Park
Pfister & Vogel Leather Co.443-455 Virginia
Fire Boat No. 39.

Downer Home ............7 Prospect Ave.
Triangle  Club.............457 Jefferson  St.
Girls' School of Trades.....18th and Wells
Protestant Home.............Lake Drive
State Industrial School.....465 Lake Drive
T. M. E. R. & L. Co.........Service Bldg.
W . U. Tel. Co................89  Michigan
Mil. Downer College........Hartford Ave.
Central continuation School 800 Mfrs Home
Lloyd Street Evening School......13th St.
Ring Street Evening School.......Ring St.
Layton  Home...............21st and  State
Young Men's Polish Alliance... .First Ave.
Boston Store.
The Eight Telephone Exchanges.
Each of fifty-eight Grammar Schools.
State Normal School.
Five High Schools.
Seven Parochial Schools.
Four Sunday Schools.
County Branch Libraries
Any resident of Milwaukee County is en-
titled to a library card on which he may
draw books at the central library, at any
city branch, or at any county branch. The
Milwaukee Public Library is free to resi-
dents of the county.
North Milwaukee...........Anna Godfrey
Wauwatosa.............. Grace Loveland
W est  Allis...............W innifred  Bailey
South Milwaukee.............Gladys Hook
Cudahy..................Margaret Glisch
These libraries are furnished with supple-
mentary collections from the Central Li-
brary, with automobile special delivery.
Each library is under the administration of
the municipality in which it is situated.
Hales  Corners  ..............Janesville  Rd.
Tippecanoe....................Howell  Rd.
W hitefish  Bay.................Lake  Drive
West Milwaukee...........National Ave.
Granville Center............Granville Rd.
Washington..................Lisbon Rd.
Green Tree............Pt. Washington Rd.
Oakwood.....................Kilbourn  Rd.
Oak  Grove..................Franklin  Twp.
Brown  Deer................Cedarburg  Rd.
Irving ..................... Mukwanago Rd.
N o.  6..........................Lisbon  R d.
Riverside......................Ryan Rd.
Root Creek................Janesville Rd.
Carrollville................Lake  Shore  Rd.
These libraries are open at different hours,
suiting the convenience of the neighborhood.

A.V1.4J1dhhd0&_ , Aifia

15