Visual display of the Aldo Leopold papers : 9/25/10-6 : Writings

				
Pine Screen (p. 14) 
 
-t o.pruce vv tnaoreaR 
 
Japanese Cypress 
 
Spruce (Picea excelsa) 
 
Japanese Yew (Taxus) 
 
Hemlock (Tsuga) 
 
EVERGREEN HEDGES 
When winter winds blow, your garden can be sheltered and peaceful-a haven
for birds. Also, tender trees and shrubs require 
protection and a hedge is as good as an unsightly burlap screeen. Write for
more information. 
 
HOW FAR APART TO PLANT 
The best results are obtained from evergreens 
12 to 24 inches high, planted 18 inches apart. 
Plants from 2 to 4 feet high should be set 2 feet 
apart. Plants 4 to 6 feet high should be set 2Y 
to 3 feet apart. 
JAPANESE YEW HEDGE 
This is the hardiest of the Yews (Taxus) and 
should give to America the fine hedges the 
English Yew gives to Europe. It continues put- 
ting on new growth all summer, so may be pruned 
with sharp knife or shears at any time. Allow it 
to grow about two to four inches each year-no 
more. Keep the bottom wider than the top. 
A HEDGE OF HEMLOCK (TSUGA) 
Soft and Dense 
One of the finest Evergreen Hedges. Trim it so 
as to be wide at the bottom and narrow at top. 
Can be sheared at any time during summer. 
Allow it to grow 4 to 6 inches a year-cut off the 
rest of the new growth. To avoid a formal effect, 
prune in June or early July. 
 
ARBORVIT (TjKA)~. 
This makes a fine hedge in the North. Prune 
any time during the Summer. Cut inside the 
surface-do not multilate the foliage itself. Can 
be kept to narrow width. Should increase about 2 
or 3 inches height each year. 
JAPANESE CYPRESS (CHAMAECYPARIS) 
Like the above, but better adapted to climate 
Zones V and VI. Can be allowed to grow 4 to 6 
inches a year and still remain dense and bushy. 
 
Dwarf Boxwood (Buxus) 
 
(100) (1000) 
 
Japanese Yew (Upright) 
*15 to 18 inches XXX. ...... $45.00  ...... 
Hemlock 
*12 to 15 inches with ball ..... $30.00 $250.00 
Arborvitae 
18 to 30 inches X ........... $12.00 $ 80.00 
*12 to 18 inches XX ......... 45.00 400.00 
Japanese Cypress (Plumed Cypress) 
Green and golden varieties (order by color) 
*12 to 15 inches X ........... $27.00 $210.00 
Norway Spruce 
* 7 to 16 inches X ........... $10.00 $ 55.00 
*12 to 15 inches XX ......... 18.00  ...... 
Dwarf Boxwood 
* 6 to 8inchesX ........... $22.00 $180.00 
Japanese Barberry 
18 to 24 inches ............. $15.00 $120.00 
lbolium Privet 
*12 to 15 inches ............. $ 5.50 $ 32.50 
 
Ground Covers In Shade 
Pachysandra (page 12) is the best where other undergrowth must 
not be damaged. Plant about 4 to a square foot. It self-roots. 
*  1-year  light .................................. $42.50  (1000) 
2-year ......................................  70.00  (1000) 
Vinca minor (page 20) Much more rapid. Lusty, vigorous grower 
and chokes out other low plants. Neat evergreen, however, all by 
itself. 
Strong  clumps ................................. $65.00  (1000) 
 
Soil Binders For Steep Banks 
Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera) (page 11) A coarse grower, 
almost evergreen. Becomes a weed, but does its job. Can be mixed 
with strong shrubs, like Rose below, to make a thicket on a bank. 
6 to  12 inches  (light) .......................... $20.00  (1000) 
8  to  12  inches X  ..............................  60.00  (1000) 
Rose Wichuriana (page 23) Evergreen and blooms a long time. 
Branches grow quickly, droop and root. Thick-set effect. Best in sun, 
but stands shade. 
*12  to  15  inches ................................ $70.00  (1000) 
Helianthemum (page 9) is the best for dry, poor soils in baking 
sun. Showy, too. 
2-year  plants ................................ $150.00  (1000) 
Note: 250 furnished at above rates. 
 
Trees and Shrubs for Bird Food 
The following list of hardy fruit-bearing shrubs for food for birds 
will be found convenient for ready reference. It embraces the best 
varieties that can now be furnished in quantity. The numbers 
following the bird names refer to the numbered plants as below. 
 
Game Birds 
Grouse: 2-5-6-7-8-11-12-16-20-21-22-26. 
Partridge: 6-7-11-12-26. 
Pheasant: 11-12-21-26. 
Prairie Chicken: 8-20. 
Quail: 2-5-6-7-11-12-15-17-19-22. 
pe: 2-6-7-12-26. 
Wild Geese: 13-24. 
Woodcock: 6-7-26. 
Song and Plumage Birds 
Blackbird: 5-6-7-15-19-22. 
Bluebird: 4-5-6-7-8-11-12-15-17-19-21- 
22-24-26. 
Bobolink: 15-17-21. 
Cardinal: 4-6-7-15-21. 
Chickadee: 6-7-19-21. 
Cuckoo: 15-21. 
Finch: 6-7-21. 
Flicker: 4-6-7-11-12-16-17-19-21-22. 
Kingbird 2-6-7-15-17-18-19-21-22-26. 
Lark: 1-2-5-6-7-15-17-21-26. 
Meadowlark: 1-26. 
Mockingbird: 3-4-11-12-15-17-18-19-21- 
22. 
Oriole: 15-17-21-22. 
Starling: 6-7-13-15-16-17-19-21-22-26. 
Swallow: 6-7-19. 
Tanager: 15-17. 
Thruh: 6-7-11-12-15-17-18-19-21-26. 
Waxwing: 4-6-7-8-11-12-13-15-17-21-24- 
26. 
Warbler: 13-19-21-26. 
Woodpecker: 6-7-11-12-15-17-19-21-22- 
26. 
Wren: 2-9-19-21-22. 
 
Trees and Shrubs 
1 Aronia arbutifolia 
2 Berberis thunbergi 
3 Callicarpia 
4 Celtis (Hackberry) 
5 Cephalanthus (Button Bush) 
6 Coms stolonifera 
7 Comus florida 
8 Eleagnus (Silverberry) 
9 Euonymus americana 
10 Vaccinium (p. 22) 
11 Ilex opaca (Holly) 
12 Ilex verticiliata 
13 Juniperus virginiana 
14 Lonicera (Honeysuckle) (bush and 
vine) 
15 Morus (Mulberry) 
16 Nyssa multiflora 
17 Prunus (Choke Cherry) 
18 Rhanums cathartica (Buckthorn) 
19 Rhus (Sumac) (in variety) 
20 Rosa (Rose) lucida and nitida (p. 23) 
21 Rubus (Raspberry) (p. 22) 
22 Sambucus (Elderberry) 
23 Sassafrass 
24 Thuya (Arborvitae) 
25 Symphoricarpos 
26 Viburnum prunifolium 
 
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THE    ORI  1 RE   ROCHESTER. " 
.ORTICULTURAI. PRINTERG 
 
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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICE 
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