THE WISCONSIN'ALUMNI MAGAZINE


the best songs but it'seems as though
this is not generally known.
  There is a   general feeling  that
scholarships in the University should
├Żbe offered 'by the club, but this feel-
ing has not crystallized' itself as yet.
It will' probably not be long before
one or two scholarships will be pre-


           FRED D. SILBER, '94
sented to students from Chicago. We
desire to see young men and women
of character and ability from Chi-
cago attending the University of Wis-
consin not only for the benefit that
they will receive, but because we be-
lieve that the good of the University
demands that the student body be
composed of representative American
young men and women and that it is
to the advantage of the students,
themselves, that they associate with
men and women from other states and
other environments.


  Another service which our club 'has
offered to undertake is the editing Of
a book of Wisconsin stories and tra-
ditions, the lack of: which has been
long felt. Some have felt that" this
work can probably be handled more
effectively by THE ALUMNI MAGAZINE
in a manner which would.- increase
both its popularity and revenue.
  Among thse -who have been 'resphji-
sible for -much of the success of the
club's activities for the last three  r
four years are J. G. Wray, Lynn Wil-
liams, Fred S. White, Fred Silber,
Arthur Van Hagan, D. A. Crawford,
E. S. Main, and many others, who
have not been so continuously active.
In  addition  to these, the club is
deeply indebted to a large number of
others for service and loyalty extend-
ing over a period of many years. I
might mention a few, such as Dr. A.
J. Ochsner, Bishop Samuel Fallows,
S. S. Gregory, Dr. Henry B. Favill,
Dr. John- M. Dodson, George Waldo,
Israel Shrimski, and   Kemper    K.
Knapp. This list would be most in-
complete if I did not mention Charles
E. Pickard and Fred Newman, now
deceased.
  The Wisconsin alumni in Chicago
are composed of many eminent and
successful business men, lawyers, doc-
tors, engineers and clergymen who are
tremendously interested in their Alma
Mater and they believe that their
ideals and that their opinions upon
the development of successful young
men and women of character are of
value, and that means should be ef-
fected for the better expression of
such and for a more intimate under-
standing and communication between
the alumni with the Faculty and the
Board of Regents.
  In some of the leading universities,
the alumni are represented in the con-


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