Visual display of the GIS as a tool to prioritize environmental releases, integrate their management and alleviate their public threat

				




ACQUIRING DATA


The Northeast Region distributes the information gathered in this report in a variety of formats.
The data is available by 3.5" floppy disks or over the WDNR network system. Hardware
requirements for this data are within current minimum requirements for all WDNR computers.
Software used to access this information is also installed on all machines. dBase files can be
directly imported in MS Access. The data consists of the original FileMakerPro database, two
databases, and two ArcView shapefiles named and described by the following:

PROJECT.fp3 - The original project site information form and database.

ERRP.dbf - This is an export and subset of the PROJECT.fp3 database consisting of a dBase file
           of site characteristics for Environmental Repair and Restoration Program sites.

LUST.dbf - This is an export and subset of the PROJECT.fp3 database consisting of a dBase file
           of site characteristics for Leaking Underground Storage Tank Program sites.

ERRP.shp
ERRP.dbf - Arcview shapefile of Environmental Repair and Restoration Program locations.
ERRP.shx

LUST.shp
LUST.dbf - ArcView shapefile of Leaking Underground Storage Tank Program locations.
LUST.shx

Both shapefiles contain the appropriate database joined to each and are referenced to the
Wisconsin Transverse Mercator North Amercian Datum 83(91)(WTM83(91)) complying with
WDNR BEITA\GEO standards.

CONCLUSIONS

The information collected is beneficial for many uses. This project fostered the retrieval of data
from closed and soon to be closed case files that soon may be archived. The project has taken
relevant data from generally inaccessible locations throughout the WDNR NER and made it
available to be used currently in making decisions. During the course of the project ranking of
WDNR case files by environmental severity was drastically altered and partially eliminated as the
agency went through a reorganization and portions of the Leaking Underground Storage Tank
program were transferred to another state agency (Wisconsin Department of Commerce). Thus
case ranking by environmental factors was not addressed within the project. However the
database created by this project enables a rapid determination of native site conditions on a local
and regional scale where good data exists. Future updates of this information will enable rapid
and accurate determinations of native environmental conditions in areas where human impacts
may be likely.

Perhaps the greatest utility of this project has been the creation of the GIS query program utilizing
ArcView. The development of this program and use of its final product has allowed the WDNR
Drinking Water and Remediation and Redevelopment Programs to transition more efficiently
toward a GIS digital site locating and information retrieval system. Both programs through Safe
Drinking Water Requirements and Brownfield Initiatives respectively are incorporating GIS
methods into their data systems. The GIS knowledge and developed methods ensued from this
project provided the basis and training platform for the initiation of a coordinated statewide effort
to integrate site information and provide access by unfamiliar GIS users.



				
      
      
				
					




USING AVENUE and ARCVIEW for DATA ANALYSIS


The Northeast Region has designed a project using ESRI's developer programming language
Avenue for ArcView. Avenue is the programming language that com/es packaged with ArcView,
it allows customization and a development environment for ArcView. Throughout the course of
the project the Northeast Region developed a program that will allow unfamiliar and
inexperienced users of ArcView the ability to query all data the Northeast Region has gathered
using GIS data gathered from previous years.

The following documentation has provided inexperienced and unfamiliar users the ability to
access accumulated groundwater data collected throughout the region.

Figure 1. This is the opening window that appears when the project is open. A button has been
           added that will allow the program to be run.
Figure 2. A customary welcome message appears stating the project has started.
Figure 3. A drop down menu will appear that will allow the user to select a county that data has
           been collected from. Brown county has been selected for this example.
Figure 4. A progress message will appear stating the county which has been selected.
Figure 5. An option menu box can also be selected that will allow the user to add additional
           statewide data layers that have been provided by the WDNR BEITA/GEO team.
           These layers include County, Municipal, Watershed, Basin Boundaries, plus other
           information. The user has the option if they want to select these layers now or they
           can be added later if needed.
Figure 6. The view has added the base layers (roads, hydrology, and wetlands) of the county
           selected. Only roads will be visible until a method has been selected to zoom to the
           area of interest. A prompt will appear that allows the user to select a way to zoom to
           the area of interest. Method 1 will ask for the Public Land Survey System (PLSS)
           Coordinates (town, range, section, /, / section). Method 2 will zoom to the area of
           interest by drawing a box around the area of interest. This is used when PLSS
           Coordinates are unknown.
Figure 7. In this example the user has selected the PLSS coordinates a message box will
           appear that prompts the user to enter the PLSS description. Also contamination
           source data layers have been added to the view. Entering the coordinates will allow
           the user to zoom to the area with a one mile radius extent.
Figure 8. When the area of interest has been zoomed to another pop-up menu will prompt the
           user to select a point to search from and enter a radius for the user to search for
           contamination sources around it.
Figure 9. The search will then label all contamination sources with a representative unique
           identification number that will match a spreadsheet printout the user is prompted to
           print if desirable.

           The above documentation allows the user to gather data that is frequently requested by
           a variety of customers. The following documentation allows users the ability to access
           more detailed records from the WDNR.

Figure 10. Also in this project various buttons have been added that will allow users to obtain
           information from other databases.
Figure 11. The W button will allow users to add well locations from the well database source of
           FilemakerPro that contains well construction reports. When the W is pressed all
           known well locations from the software will be added to ArcView a box can be drawn
           on the view and FilemakerPro will start automatically and locate the selected wells
           from the view.
Figure 12. This is an example of the well log that was selected from the ArcView project.
Figure 13. You may also query records from FilemakerPro to select records displayed in
           ArcView.