Books

Gone but not forgotten : Atlantans commemorate the Civil War

Author / Creator
Venet, Wendy Hamand, author
Available as
Online
Summary

"This book examines the ways that Atlantans have remembered the Civil War since 1865. During the Civil War, Atlanta became the second most important city in the Confederacy, after Richmond. Since t...

"This book examines the ways that Atlantans have remembered the Civil War since 1865. During the Civil War, Atlanta became the second most important city in the Confederacy, after Richmond. Since the end of the war, Atlanta's civic and business leaders promoted its image as a 'Phoenix City' rising from the ashes of General William T. Sherman's wartime destruction. According to this carefully constructed view, Atlanta respects its Confederate past while also moving forward with business growth and 'progress.' Yet in spite of its economic success since 1865, Atlanta is a city where the meaning of the Civil War continues to be debated and contested, where whites and blacks remember the war in different and conflicting ways. Periodically, racial tension has marred the city's reputation and its progressive spirit. Today, Atlanta (and the South) have achieved reconciliation with the North but debate over Civil War memory is ongoing"--Provided by publisher.

Creator
Wendy Hamand Venet
Format
Books
Language
English
Contributors
Publication
  • Athens : The University of Georgia Press, [2020]
  • [©2020]
Physical Details
  • 1 online resource
  • data file
ISBNs
0820358312, 9780820358130, 9780820358123, 9780820358314, 0820358134, 0820358126
OCLC
on1196331517

  • Includes bibliographical references and index.

  • Preface: Solomon Luckie and the Lamppost -- The Lost Cause -- The New South -- Sectional Reconciliation in a Time of Racial Tension -- The UDC and the Struggle over Stone Mountain -- Artists, Writers, and Historians of the 1920s-1930s -- The Civil War Centennial -- Shades of Gray
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