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Drug control and human rights in international law

Lines, Richard, 1965- author Save to your list

Publication Details Cite/Export

  • Creator Richard Lines ; foreword by William A. Schabas
  • Format Books
  • Publication Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2017. ©2017
  • Physical Details
    • xxxvi, 207 pages ; 24 cm
  • ISBNs 1107171172, 9781107171176
  • OCLC ocn959373632

Summary

  • "Human rights violations occurring as a consequence of drug control and enforcement are a growing concern, and raise questions of treaty interpretation and of the appropriate balancing of concomitant obligations within the drug control and human rights treaty regimes. Tracing the evolution of international drug control law since 1909, this book explores the tensions between the regime's self-described humanitarian aspirations and its suppression of a common human behaviour as a form of 'evil'. Drawing on domestic, regional and international examples and case law, it posits the development of a dynamic, human rights-based interpretative approach to resolve tensions and conflicts between the regimes in a manner that safeguards human rights."--

Notes

  • Includes bibliographical references and index.

Contents

  • Foreword / William A. Schabas -- Drug control, human rights and 'parallel universes' -- The 'fourth stage' of drug control : development, structure and law -- Humanitarian or stigmatising? : the contradictory paradigms of international drug control -- Drug control and human rights : complementarities, conflicts and tensions between the regimes -- The object and purpose of international drug control regime -- The case for dynamic interpretation of the international drug control conventions -- Moving the 'thumb on the scales' : towards a dynamic human rights-based interpretation of international drug control law -- The future for a 'fifth stage' of drug control

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