Oneida culture oral history project records, 1940-1942

Federal Writers' Project

Publication Details Click to collapse Cite/Export

  • Format Mixed Materials
  • Physical Details
    • 4.6 c.f. (18 archives boxes, 1 flat box, and 1 card box)
  • Finding Aids
    • Register

Restrictions

  • COLLECTION STORED, ALL or IN-PART, AT ARC: Collection can be requested for transfer through the Area Research Center (ARC) Network, consult Reading Room Staff.
  • Restricted: Copyright to the interviews may reside with the interviewer/interviewee or their descendants within the limits of Federal Copyright Law; researchers wishing to use this collection are asked to read and sign the "Guidelines for Researchers" form which accompanies this collection. Additionally, researchers are reminded that interviews contain accounts of personal life and cultural practice whose publication or quotation without permission may violate Tribal law protecting indigenous works as well as the privacy rights of interviewers/interviewees or their descendants.

Summary

  • Records of a WPA project to document the history and culture of the Oneida in Wisconsin, conducted through the University of Wisconsin. The records consist primarily of a series of notebooks from oral history interviews that took place between 1941-1942 that were conducted by Oneida tribe members under the direction of UW anthropologists. The interviews concern such topics as Oneida history, family life, religion, economic conditions, education, medicine, hunting and fishing, recreation, traditional stories and jokes, the Workers' Alliance, the Six Nations Confederacy, and the Oneida Indian Cooperative Association. Also included are Employment Eligibility Surveys conducted by the interviewers, focusing on the education level and work experience of tribe members, maps of Oneida Village and the surrounding area, and an index card file of citations, principally from the Green Bay Gazette, of news articles relating to the Oneida tribe from 1898-1904 and 1931-1940.

Notes

  • Presented by the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis., 2000.
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